Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJoaquin Guzman
IN THE NEWS

Joaquin Guzman

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
February 24, 2014 | By Richard Fausset and Tracy Wilkinson
BADIRAGUATO, Mexico - Now that the Mexican government has nabbed the country's most-wanted drug lord, Fernando Antonio Robles is worried about the future. Robles is a 16-year-old bricklayer's apprentice in the wild drug-producing municipality where Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman grew up. In this hardscrabble patch of mountainous Sinaloa state, more than 74% of the people live in poverty. And yet the tiny county seat is full of fine new, freshly painted houses. Robles knows that many of them were built by El Chapo's men. "A lot of people are going to be unemployed," Robles said while loitering with a friend on the handsome town square, "because a lot of people worked for him. " The arrest of Guzman on Saturday in the resort city of Mazatlan, a few hours' drive and a world away from Badiraguato, was greeted with delight by the Mexican government.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
March 2, 2014 | By Richard Fausset and Richard A. Serrano
MEXICO CITY - With the arrest of Sinaloa cartel boss Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, the leadership of Mexico's largest and most sophisticated illegal drug operation has probably transferred to Ismael "El Mayo" Zambada, a 66-year-old former farmer with a knack for business - and maintaining a low profile. But Zambada is likely to discover, much as Guzman did, that inheriting the throne of top capo comes with a series of complications worthy of a Shakespearean king. Like his predecessor, Zambada is a country boy made good who hails from the badlands of Sinaloa, the traditional heart of Mexican drug-smuggling culture.
Advertisement
WORLD
February 23, 2014 | Tracy Wilkinson, Don Bartletti and Richard A. Serrano
Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, one of the world's biggest drug traffickers and Mexico's most-wanted fugitive, was captured Saturday in a joint U.S.-Mexican operation after more than a decade on the run, officials of both countries announced. Guzman was arrested by agents who burst into the seaside condominium in the Sinaloa resort of Mazatlan where he had moved just two days earlier. His capture was a huge symbolic blow to Mexican drug trafficking, a world in which he had reached folk hero status, and an important victory for the government of President Enrique Pena Nieto.
WORLD
February 24, 2014 | By Richard Fausset and Tracy Wilkinson
BADIRAGUATO, Mexico - Now that the Mexican government has nabbed the country's most-wanted drug lord, Fernando Antonio Robles is worried about the future. Robles is a 16-year-old bricklayer's apprentice in the wild drug-producing municipality where Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman grew up. In this hardscrabble patch of mountainous Sinaloa state, more than 74% of the people live in poverty. And yet the tiny county seat is full of fine new, freshly painted houses. Robles knows that many of them were built by El Chapo's men. "A lot of people are going to be unemployed," Robles said while loitering with a friend on the handsome town square, "because a lot of people worked for him. " The arrest of Guzman on Saturday in the resort city of Mazatlan, a few hours' drive and a world away from Badiraguato, was greeted with delight by the Mexican government.
WORLD
March 2, 2014 | By Richard Fausset and Richard A. Serrano
MEXICO CITY - With the arrest of Sinaloa cartel boss Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, the leadership of Mexico's largest and most sophisticated illegal drug operation has probably transferred to Ismael "El Mayo" Zambada, a 66-year-old former farmer with a knack for business - and maintaining a low profile. But Zambada is likely to discover, much as Guzman did, that inheriting the throne of top capo comes with a series of complications worthy of a Shakespearean king. Like his predecessor, Zambada is a country boy made good who hails from the badlands of Sinaloa, the traditional heart of Mexican drug-smuggling culture.
WORLD
February 22, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Joaquin Guzman, "El Chapo," the most wanted drug lord in Mexico and a multibillionaire fugitive, has been captured, a senior U.S. official said Saturday. Few details were available. But Guzman has long been considered the top prize and most elusive figure in an extensive, ongoing drug war that has left tens of thousands of Mexicans dead. Guzman led the Sinaloa cartel, the most powerful, richest and oldest of the drug-trafficking networks in Mexico. The group is responsible for the shipment of tons of cocaine and marijuana to the U.S. The senior official said Guzman was captured early Saturday in the Sinaloa city of Mazatlan and was being transported to Mexico City.
WORLD
May 13, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Mexican soldiers have arrested the man who authorities say replaced slain drug lord Ignacio Coronel as a ranking leader of the powerful Sinaloa cartel, the military said Friday. Soldiers captured Martin Beltran Coronel in Zapopan, an upscale suburb of the western city of Guadalajara. Authorities described him as a nephew of Coronel, one of Mexico's most powerful drug kingpins, who was killed by troops in July during a raid in the same suburb. Gen. Edgar Luis Villegas said Joaquin Guzman, Mexico's most wanted drug fugitive and head of the alliance of Sinaloa traffickers, chose Beltran to assume command over Coronel's faction.
WORLD
November 14, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson
Mexicans were none too pleased to read that their country's most-wanted cocaine kingpin has been ranked by Forbes magazine as one of the most powerful people in the world. Joaquin Guzman, alias El Chapo -- Spanish for "Shorty" -- was listed by Forbes this week as No. 41 in a collection of 67 ("one for every 100 million people on the planet") movers, shakers, rulers and crooks judged as the people who really run the world. A senior official with the Mexican attorney general's office, Juan de Dios Castro, said the inclusion of Guzman was "frivolous," and Mexican Ambassador to the United States Arturo Sarukhan used his debut on Twitter to denounce it. "Sadly, Forbes insists in parading criminals and drug-traffickers," he wrote, according to the Reforma newspaper.
WORLD
February 22, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson and Richard A. Serrano
MEXICO CITY -- Mexico's most wanted drug lord, Joaquin Guzman, known as "El Chapo," was captured Saturday in a joint operation by Mexican and U.S. federal agents, a senior U.S. official said. Guzman, long considered the top prize and most elusive figure in the ongoing drug war that has left tens of thousands of Mexicans dead, was taken into custody before dawn at a hotel in the seaside Sinaloa resort town of Mazatlan. Guzman led the Sinaloa cartel, the most powerful, richest and oldest of the drug-trafficking networks in Mexico.
OPINION
November 1, 2010 | By Mitchell Koss
As Californians get ready to vote on Proposition 19, which would legalize the individual possession of small amounts of marijuana for recreational use, one area of debate is what effect passage would have on the illegal drug business here and in violence-torn Mexico. I can't predict the future, but I can say a little about narco-trafficking, having covered it off and on over four continents since the early 1990s. Traditionally, the bulk of the United States' marijuana has come from Mexico; even today, despite a recent increase in the amount of pot grown in California, researchers at Rand Corp.
WORLD
February 23, 2014 | Tracy Wilkinson, Don Bartletti and Richard A. Serrano
Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, one of the world's biggest drug traffickers and Mexico's most-wanted fugitive, was captured Saturday in a joint U.S.-Mexican operation after more than a decade on the run, officials of both countries announced. Guzman was arrested by agents who burst into the seaside condominium in the Sinaloa resort of Mazatlan where he had moved just two days earlier. His capture was a huge symbolic blow to Mexican drug trafficking, a world in which he had reached folk hero status, and an important victory for the government of President Enrique Pena Nieto.
WORLD
February 22, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Joaquin Guzman, "El Chapo," the most wanted drug lord in Mexico and a multibillionaire fugitive, has been captured, a senior U.S. official said Saturday. Few details were available. But Guzman has long been considered the top prize and most elusive figure in an extensive, ongoing drug war that has left tens of thousands of Mexicans dead. Guzman led the Sinaloa cartel, the most powerful, richest and oldest of the drug-trafficking networks in Mexico. The group is responsible for the shipment of tons of cocaine and marijuana to the U.S. The senior official said Guzman was captured early Saturday in the Sinaloa city of Mazatlan and was being transported to Mexico City.
WORLD
February 22, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson and Richard A. Serrano
MEXICO CITY -- Mexico's most wanted drug lord, Joaquin Guzman, known as "El Chapo," was captured Saturday in a joint operation by Mexican and U.S. federal agents, a senior U.S. official said. Guzman, long considered the top prize and most elusive figure in the ongoing drug war that has left tens of thousands of Mexicans dead, was taken into custody before dawn at a hotel in the seaside Sinaloa resort town of Mazatlan. Guzman led the Sinaloa cartel, the most powerful, richest and oldest of the drug-trafficking networks in Mexico.
WORLD
February 22, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Authorities conducted aerial sweeps over Guatemala's northern jungle Friday in search of bodies left by a reported gun battle between Mexican traffickers, but speculation that a notorious drug lord died there was fading fast. Guatemalan Interior Minister Mauricio Lopez Bonilla said residents in the hard-to-access Peten region on Guatemala's northern border with Mexico reported seeing convoys of heavily armed men Thursday who engaged in a gun battle. They reported seeing two dead bodies, Lopez Bonilla told a local radio station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2012 | By Richard Marosi and Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - A woman claiming to be the daughter of the world's most wanted drug trafficker was arrested at the San Ysidro port of entry Friday afternoon after trying to enter the country with fraudulent documents, according to a criminal complaint and a high-ranking U.S. law enforcement official. Alejandrina Gisselle Guzman Salazar allegedly told U.S. customs officers that she was traveling to Los Angeles to give birth. After questioning, she admitted that she was the daughter of Joaquin "Chapo" Guzman, the leader of Mexico's Sinaloa drug cartel, said the unidentified official who is not authorized to speak about the case.
WORLD
March 12, 2012 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
A tantalizing question is spicing up talk shows and opinion columns as Mexican voters prepare to elect a new president: Will the government spring a "June surprise" by finally nabbing Joaquin "Chapo" Guzman? Guzman, you might recall, is the world's most wanted drug suspect — on the lam since escaping a Mexican federal prison in a laundry cart in 2001. He allegedly sits atop a vast crime network reaching into the United States and across much of the globe, and is ranked by Forbes magazine as one of the world's richest men. In other words, Guzman would be a sweet trophy for President Felipe Calderon, who could use a big score before voters head to the polls July 1. Calderon's conservative National Action Party, or PAN, and its presidential candidate, Josefina Vazquez Mota, trail in the polls, even though formal campaigning hasn't begun yet. Far ahead is Enrique Peña Nieto, a former governor who hopes to guide the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, back into power after 12 years on the sidelines.
WORLD
November 3, 2008 | Tracy Wilkinson, Wilkinson is a Times staff writer.
He appears in a restaurant, picks up everyone's tab, then vanishes with his many guards. He stars in his wedding, government officials among the guests. He is captured, then released. Twice. Or maybe not. Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, Mexico's most-wanted drug-trafficking fugitive, chalks up more sightings than Elvis. He is everywhere, and nowhere, a long-sought criminal always a step ahead of the law, yet always in sight or mind.
WORLD
September 27, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson and Ken Ellingwood
Reporting from Mexico City - The spaces for "Name of Father" are blank. But the L.A. County birth certificates list the mother, who happens to be the young wife of a highly sought-after drug lord, Joaquin "Chapo" Guzman. Emma Coronel traveled to Southern California in mid-July and gave birth Aug. 15 to twin girls at Antelope Valley Hospital in Lancaster, according to birth records and a senior U.S. law enforcement official. Turns out Coronel, a 22-year-old former beauty queen, holds U.S. citizenship, which entitles her to travel freely to the United States.
WORLD
May 13, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Mexican soldiers have arrested the man who authorities say replaced slain drug lord Ignacio Coronel as a ranking leader of the powerful Sinaloa cartel, the military said Friday. Soldiers captured Martin Beltran Coronel in Zapopan, an upscale suburb of the western city of Guadalajara. Authorities described him as a nephew of Coronel, one of Mexico's most powerful drug kingpins, who was killed by troops in July during a raid in the same suburb. Gen. Edgar Luis Villegas said Joaquin Guzman, Mexico's most wanted drug fugitive and head of the alliance of Sinaloa traffickers, chose Beltran to assume command over Coronel's faction.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|