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Joaquin Hernandez Galicia

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2013 | Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - Joaquin Hernandez Galicia, the former Mexican oil union boss who rose to control a political empire built on patronage and intimidation but was eventually dethroned by a Mexican president wary of his vast power, died Monday. He was 91. Hernandez, who went by the nickname "La Quina," a play on his first name, died in the port city of Tampico, where he had been hospitalized with an abdominal ailment, according to the news agency Notimex. Both the rise of Hernandez, starting in the 1950s, and his subsequent arrest by former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari in 1989, demonstrated the legacy of the old feudal system that infected Mexican public life long after the country's independence from Spain.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2013 | Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - Joaquin Hernandez Galicia, the former Mexican oil union boss who rose to control a political empire built on patronage and intimidation but was eventually dethroned by a Mexican president wary of his vast power, died Monday. He was 91. Hernandez, who went by the nickname "La Quina," a play on his first name, died in the port city of Tampico, where he had been hospitalized with an abdominal ailment, according to the news agency Notimex. Both the rise of Hernandez, starting in the 1950s, and his subsequent arrest by former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari in 1989, demonstrated the legacy of the old feudal system that infected Mexican public life long after the country's independence from Spain.
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NEWS
January 16, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
He was impudent, daring to leave the room while governors spoke and to address presidents in vulgar language. He was savvy, quick to identify the weaknesses of his adversaries and quicker yet to exploit them.
WORLD
February 27, 2013 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - The reversal of fortune could not have been more striking. And for many Mexicans, the images, broadcast live on national television Wednesday, could not have been more unexpected. Here, once again, was Elba Esther Gordillo, the powerful boss of Mexico's massive, sclerotic teachers union. But instead of the image Mexicans were used to - Gordillo standing in front of adoring followers, defiantly speechifying, dressed to the nines - her famous face was now barely visible through the bars of a Mexico City jail.
NEWS
January 17, 1989
A judge ordered 46 leaders of Mexico's oil workers union to stand trial on charges of arms smuggling and corruption, and a union official said that arrest warrants have been issued for as many as 35 others in a further crackdown on the powerful labor organization. Police last week arrested the 46, including union boss Joaquin Hernandez Galicia, in a move to abolish graft in the top ranks of the union.
NEWS
May 19, 1989
Eighty people were hurt when rival members of Mexico's oil workers' union, still feuding after the arrest of their powerful boss in January, clashed over control of a union local in Veracruz state, about 135 miles east of Mexico City. Police said that about 200 club-swinging workers stormed union headquarters in the oil town of Poza Rica in a bid to oust members of a rival faction that had seized the building. Police broke up the clash but made no arrests, a spokesman said. The skirmish apparently pitted union members backing the new national leadership against followers of Joaquin Hernandez Galicia, who was arrested on arms-smuggling and murder charges in January.
NEWS
June 3, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican judicial independence appeared to have suffered a setback Friday when it was learned that a judge had overturned the murder conviction of an ailing former union leader the day after his wife met with the interior minister to plead for him. Joaquin Hernandez Galicia, known as "La Quina" in the decades when he headed Mexico's powerful oil workers' union, could be released from jail as early as next week, his attorney told reporters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1989
In Mexico, where powerful labor unions and official corruption are both key elements of the nation's political system, few union leaders were as powerful as Joaquin Hernandez Galicia, better known by his nickname La Quina, and none were considered as corrupt or as violent. Many Mexian political analysts likened his hold on the naion's oil workers' union to the control that gangster Al Capone once wielded over Chicago.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
In an unprecedented blow against organized labor, the Mexican government Tuesday arrested the powerful leader of the national oil workers union in a military raid that officials said netted hundreds of automatic weapons. Joaquin Hernandez Galicia, known as La Quina, was detained at his Ciudad Madero home in the coastal state of Tamaulipas after a shoot-out between his bodyguards and federal police backed by the army. A federal agent was killed.
NEWS
February 3, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Less than a month after troops arrested the powerful chief of the oil workers union, President Carlos Salinas de Gortari cemented his victory over labor Thursday when the union elected a new, pro-government secretary general. Sebastian Guzman Cabrera was brought back from forced retirement after the arrest of union boss Joaquin Hernandez Galicia and become the only candidate for the union's top post. Guzman Cabrera won on a unanimous voice vote at a special assembly in the union hall.
NEWS
June 3, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican judicial independence appeared to have suffered a setback Friday when it was learned that a judge had overturned the murder conviction of an ailing former union leader the day after his wife met with the interior minister to plead for him. Joaquin Hernandez Galicia, known as "La Quina" in the decades when he headed Mexico's powerful oil workers' union, could be released from jail as early as next week, his attorney told reporters.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like most Mexican towns, Ciudad Madero is built around a tree-lined central square where men, old and young, gather to mull over the day as the beating tropical heat gives way to a cool nightfall. But there is little relief in this town square, dubbed the "Wailing Plaza" by the men who meet here each evening to lament their layoffs from the national petroleum monopoly, Pemex.
NEWS
May 19, 1989
Eighty people were hurt when rival members of Mexico's oil workers' union, still feuding after the arrest of their powerful boss in January, clashed over control of a union local in Veracruz state, about 135 miles east of Mexico City. Police said that about 200 club-swinging workers stormed union headquarters in the oil town of Poza Rica in a bid to oust members of a rival faction that had seized the building. Police broke up the clash but made no arrests, a spokesman said. The skirmish apparently pitted union members backing the new national leadership against followers of Joaquin Hernandez Galicia, who was arrested on arms-smuggling and murder charges in January.
NEWS
February 3, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Less than a month after troops arrested the powerful chief of the oil workers union, President Carlos Salinas de Gortari cemented his victory over labor Thursday when the union elected a new, pro-government secretary general. Sebastian Guzman Cabrera was brought back from forced retirement after the arrest of union boss Joaquin Hernandez Galicia and become the only candidate for the union's top post. Guzman Cabrera won on a unanimous voice vote at a special assembly in the union hall.
NEWS
January 17, 1989
A judge ordered 46 leaders of Mexico's oil workers union to stand trial on charges of arms smuggling and corruption, and a union official said that arrest warrants have been issued for as many as 35 others in a further crackdown on the powerful labor organization. Police last week arrested the 46, including union boss Joaquin Hernandez Galicia, in a move to abolish graft in the top ranks of the union.
NEWS
January 16, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
He was impudent, daring to leave the room while governors spoke and to address presidents in vulgar language. He was savvy, quick to identify the weaknesses of his adversaries and quicker yet to exploit them.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Mexican motorists jammed gas stations in panic buying and armed soldiers guarded most of the nation's refineries against possible sabotage Wednesday after the violent arrest of the leader of the oil workers union on arms smuggling charges.
WORLD
February 27, 2013 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - The reversal of fortune could not have been more striking. And for many Mexicans, the images, broadcast live on national television Wednesday, could not have been more unexpected. Here, once again, was Elba Esther Gordillo, the powerful boss of Mexico's massive, sclerotic teachers union. But instead of the image Mexicans were used to - Gordillo standing in front of adoring followers, defiantly speechifying, dressed to the nines - her famous face was now barely visible through the bars of a Mexico City jail.
NEWS
January 14, 1989
Having been born and raised in Pasadena starting in 1914, I feel I have a right to complain about the commercialization of so many of the floats in the "modern day" Tournament of Roses parade. The parade was originally conceived as a happy and joyful celebration of the coming of the new year; not as a money-making advertising media for corporations. It is both derading and debasing to the original concept for these companies to compete for the biggest, the tallest and the most gaudy float.
NEWS
January 13, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Arresting Joaquin Hernandez Galicia on illegal weapons charges, as the government did this week, is like nabbing Al Capone for tax evasion: It is convenient, provable and not the real reason the oil union boss is behind bars. Like other union and political leaders in Mexico, La Quina, as Hernandez Galicia is called, was known to surround himself with tough bodyguards and to keep a cache of weapons close at hand.
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