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Joaquin Murrieta

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OPINION
May 9, 1999
The various manifestations of Joaquin Murrieta demonstrate the malleability and popular appeal of the legend ("The Many Myths of Murrieta," May 4). The story of this "touchstone of ethnic identity" was shaped largely by a Cherokee journalist who advocated assimilation into the Anglo cultural mainstream. John Rollin Ridge, also known as Yellow Bird, was just a boy when his grandfather helped negotiate the treaty that led to the Trail of Tears. Ridge may have had this betrayal in mind when he created the motivation for Murrieta's revenge in the form of a "company of unprincipled Americans" who drive him from his land "with no other excuse than that he was 'an infernal Mexican intruder!
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2006 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Who in the world is Harry Love? His obscurity contrasts with the notoriety of the man he brought to justice, bandit and murderer Joaquin Murrieta. In 1853, Love organized California's first law enforcement agency, the California Rangers. They ambushed Murrieta and his gang in Fresno County, along what is now California 33. They cut off his head and took it with them to prove he was dead and collect a reward. Murrieta's legend survived the indignity.
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NEWS
August 13, 2006 | Juliana Barbassa, Associated Press Writer
Hoofbeats pounded the dry dirt into fine powder. Though the sun had just arched over the surrounding orchards, sweat covered the horses and riders and formed muddy rivulets as it mixed with the dust. In spite of the day's triple-digit heat, dozens of Californians of Mexican descent joined the start of a three-day ride over 70 miles of country roads, their annual homage to Joaquin Murrieta, Central California's own Gold Rush-era Robin Hood.
NEWS
May 4, 1999 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ay, what laws so unjust To call me a bandit. --From the ballad "Joaquin Murrieta" **** Darting about a table littered with maps, antique books, Gold Rush-era portraits and a jug of Mexican moonshine, Alfredo Figueroa seems determined to revive this ghost if it kills him. He's chattering a blue streak, smoothing newspaper clippings, riffling census records and jabbing his finger at the name of the dead man they simply won't let rest. "We're trying to clear up his name," Figueroa insists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2006 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Who in the world is Harry Love? His obscurity contrasts with the notoriety of the man he brought to justice, bandit and murderer Joaquin Murrieta. In 1853, Love organized California's first law enforcement agency, the California Rangers. They ambushed Murrieta and his gang in Fresno County, along what is now California 33. They cut off his head and took it with them to prove he was dead and collect a reward. Murrieta's legend survived the indignity.
NEWS
August 13, 2006 | Juliana Barbassa, Associated Press Writer
Hoofbeats pounded the dry dirt into fine powder. Though the sun had just arched over the surrounding orchards, sweat covered the horses and riders and formed muddy rivulets as it mixed with the dust. In spite of the day's triple-digit heat, dozens of Californians of Mexican descent joined the start of a three-day ride over 70 miles of country roads, their annual homage to Joaquin Murrieta, Central California's own Gold Rush-era Robin Hood.
OPINION
January 17, 1988
Being a minority freshman at UC Berkeley, I took great interest in Smith's story. It was the first time I had seen a major newspaper address the crucial issue of minority students being thrust into predominantely white schools and the subsequent problems of negative treatment by other students and inaction by university officials in changing the status quo. I feel that the author did an excellent job of relaying the individual students' experiences and...
NEWS
November 8, 1997
Josefa Sanchez, an Eastside community activist and a founder of the Mexican American Political Assn., has died. She was 66. Sanchez died Sunday at her Boyle Heights home of cancer, her daughter Margarita Sanchez said Friday. The politically oriented Sanchez worked to elect former U.S. Rep. Edward R. Roybal to the Los Angeles City Council in the 1950s and ran unsuccessfully to succeed him on the council when he was elected to Congress in 1963.
OPINION
May 9, 1999
The various manifestations of Joaquin Murrieta demonstrate the malleability and popular appeal of the legend ("The Many Myths of Murrieta," May 4). The story of this "touchstone of ethnic identity" was shaped largely by a Cherokee journalist who advocated assimilation into the Anglo cultural mainstream. John Rollin Ridge, also known as Yellow Bird, was just a boy when his grandfather helped negotiate the treaty that led to the Trail of Tears. Ridge may have had this betrayal in mind when he created the motivation for Murrieta's revenge in the form of a "company of unprincipled Americans" who drive him from his land "with no other excuse than that he was 'an infernal Mexican intruder!
NEWS
May 4, 1999 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ay, what laws so unjust To call me a bandit. --From the ballad "Joaquin Murrieta" **** Darting about a table littered with maps, antique books, Gold Rush-era portraits and a jug of Mexican moonshine, Alfredo Figueroa seems determined to revive this ghost if it kills him. He's chattering a blue streak, smoothing newspaper clippings, riffling census records and jabbing his finger at the name of the dead man they simply won't let rest. "We're trying to clear up his name," Figueroa insists.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1999 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One dozen filmmakers, half of them based in California, received grants this week totaling nearly $600,000 for their projects examining Latino life. The themes range from the determination of a Los Angeles Chicano policeman to build a relationship with his daughter to the tensions in the northern Mexican border city of Ciudad Juarez, which has been terrorized by a serial killer for six years. "We had young Latino producers, veteran producers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1995 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
1. CAMP 19 * 22550 East Fork Road, Azusa In 1853, near what would become Claremont, four outlaws robbed a stage carrying a Wells Fargo chest filled with $30,000. They fled up San Antonio Canyon, with a posse not far behind. The leader headed down the east fork of the San Gabriel River. Before he was shot down, he is said to have buried his money-laden saddlebags in a grove of oak trees, now believed to be part of State Prison Camp 19. The money was never recovered. 2.
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