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Joaquin Villalobos

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WORLD
October 22, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
When he was the ruthless military commander of El Salvador's leftist guerrillas two decades ago, Joaquin Villalobos was a big fan of body counts. The higher the death toll, he would say, the closer to victory, because it meant the enemy was being eliminated. Today, the man U.S. officials once called "the baby-faced killer" has emerged somewhat improbably as one of the key advisors behind conservative Mexican President Felipe Calderon's military crackdown on powerful drug cartels.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The death of Salvadoran poet Roque Dalton in 1975 is one of the great tragedies of Latin American literature and of the Latin American left. And it was a tragedy the left inflicted on itself. Dalton had joined one of the armed rebel groups fighting against El Salvador's dictatorship. He had, by then, already established an international reputation as a writer. Most of his best writing came during his exile in Cuba, where he wrote seven books of poetry, and “ Miguel Marmol ,” a biography of a 1930s Salvadoran revolutionary that's one of the great, underappreciated masterpieces of Latin American historical writing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The death of Salvadoran poet Roque Dalton in 1975 is one of the great tragedies of Latin American literature and of the Latin American left. And it was a tragedy the left inflicted on itself. Dalton had joined one of the armed rebel groups fighting against El Salvador's dictatorship. He had, by then, already established an international reputation as a writer. Most of his best writing came during his exile in Cuba, where he wrote seven books of poetry, and “ Miguel Marmol ,” a biography of a 1930s Salvadoran revolutionary that's one of the great, underappreciated masterpieces of Latin American historical writing.
WORLD
October 22, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
When he was the ruthless military commander of El Salvador's leftist guerrillas two decades ago, Joaquin Villalobos was a big fan of body counts. The higher the death toll, he would say, the closer to victory, because it meant the enemy was being eliminated. Today, the man U.S. officials once called "the baby-faced killer" has emerged somewhat improbably as one of the key advisors behind conservative Mexican President Felipe Calderon's military crackdown on powerful drug cartels.
NEWS
July 31, 1988 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
Joaquin Villalobos, one of the most militant guerrilla leaders in the Salvadoran civil war, says he is easing his once total opposition to leftist participation in this country's electoral process, according to various diplomatic sources.
NEWS
September 12, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
El Salvador's leftist guerrillas Monday said that their leading military strategist, Joaquin Villalobos, and another top commander will head the rebel delegation in peace talks this week with the new right-wing government of President Alfredo Cristiani. The Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front guerrillas also declared an 11-day cease-fire beginning Wednesday "to create the best environment possible" for the dialogue. They already have suspended the use of mines and curtailed sabotage.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration hopes to seek a U.S. indictment of Salvadoran guerrilla leader Joaquin Villalobos for the killing of two American airmen who fell into rebel hands in a helicopter crash on New Year's Day, officials said Monday.
NEWS
September 22, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly a decade, guerrilla commander Joaquin Villalobos operated out of a remote mountain base in northeastern El Salvador, earning himself a reputation as the rebels' best and meanest military strategist. He was a communist wolf to the country's right-wing elite and an enigma to the rest of El Salvador. Villalobos let years go by without talking to the press and often refused to leave his post even to meet with his own civilian allies on the left.
NEWS
May 17, 1985 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The leftist guerrillas of El Salvador, pursued by increasingly large and well-armed government forces, appear to be changing tactics and returning to a style of warfare they had abandoned as slow and ineffective. The guerrillas--there are five separate factions allied in the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front--have broken up their relatively large concentrations and reorganized them as smaller, more maneuverable fighting teams.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Salvadoran guerrilla commander Joaquin Villalobos, who has built Latin America's strongest rebel army and steered it through nearly a decade of civil war, said Saturday that he now believes the way to make revolutionary change is through peace. Villalobos said that the rebels of the Farabundo National Liberation Front realize they cannot achieve their revolutionary goals alone and, instead, must ally themselves with centrist political sectors.
NEWS
March 6, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade ago, the search for Joaquin Villalobos required a bone-grinding jeep trip past hostile army checkpoints, across a mined riverbed and into the rough mountains of El Salvador. Even that might come to naught if one of Latin America's ablest and most ruthless guerrilla leaders refused to show his face to outsiders, as he often did for years at a time.
NEWS
September 6, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than two decades after his death, Roque Dalton, one of El Salvador's best-known poets and revolutionaries, is once again calling his countrymen's attention to the violence and poverty that caused a 12-year civil war--and which still exist.
NEWS
September 22, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly a decade, guerrilla commander Joaquin Villalobos operated out of a remote mountain base in northeastern El Salvador, earning himself a reputation as the rebels' best and meanest military strategist. He was a communist wolf to the country's right-wing elite and an enigma to the rest of El Salvador. Villalobos let years go by without talking to the press and often refused to leave his post even to meet with his own civilian allies on the left.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration hopes to seek a U.S. indictment of Salvadoran guerrilla leader Joaquin Villalobos for the killing of two American airmen who fell into rebel hands in a helicopter crash on New Year's Day, officials said Monday.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Salvadoran guerrilla commander Joaquin Villalobos, who has built Latin America's strongest rebel army and steered it through nearly a decade of civil war, said Saturday that he now believes the way to make revolutionary change is through peace. Villalobos said that the rebels of the Farabundo National Liberation Front realize they cannot achieve their revolutionary goals alone and, instead, must ally themselves with centrist political sectors.
NEWS
September 12, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
El Salvador's leftist guerrillas Monday said that their leading military strategist, Joaquin Villalobos, and another top commander will head the rebel delegation in peace talks this week with the new right-wing government of President Alfredo Cristiani. The Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front guerrillas also declared an 11-day cease-fire beginning Wednesday "to create the best environment possible" for the dialogue. They already have suspended the use of mines and curtailed sabotage.
NEWS
September 6, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than two decades after his death, Roque Dalton, one of El Salvador's best-known poets and revolutionaries, is once again calling his countrymen's attention to the violence and poverty that caused a 12-year civil war--and which still exist.
OPINION
August 31, 1986 | JORGE G. CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda, a professor of political science at the National University of Mexico and political commentator for the Mexican weekly Proceso, is currently a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington.
After nearly two years' interruption, the Salvadoran insurgents and the government of President Napoleon Duarte agreed in Mexico City last week to hold their third round of talks in the small El Salvador village of Cesori on Sept. 19. This comes as good news to the people of that beleaguered country, but the bad news is that the discussions will probably advance no further than the previous ones.
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
El Salvador's guerrilla commanders, currently engaged in a dual military and diplomatic offensive, say they hope that President-elect George Bush will pursue a "more pragmatic" Central America policy than his predecessor, one that allows for a negotiated solution to their country's eight-year civil war.
NEWS
July 31, 1988 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
Joaquin Villalobos, one of the most militant guerrilla leaders in the Salvadoran civil war, says he is easing his once total opposition to leftist participation in this country's electoral process, according to various diplomatic sources.
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