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Job Discrimination

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BUSINESS
March 6, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Federal job discrimination complaints by workers against private employers rose 9% last year, the biggest annual increase since the early 1990s. The data released by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission show allegations of discrimination based on race, retaliation and sex were the most frequent. There were 82,792 complaints filed in the budget year ended Sept. 30.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
November 6, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
In the latest example of the profound change in Americans' attitudes toward homosexuality, the Senate is moving toward a vote on a bill that would outlaw job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. But whether the Employment Non-Discrimination Act becomes law could depend on whether the Republican leadership in the House decides to alienate the very voters it will need to attract to remain competitive on a national level. Initial indications are that the Republicans, who sullied their brand with last month's disastrous shutdown of the federal government, may sabotage both the bill known as ENDA and their own prospects.
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BUSINESS
September 28, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Tyson Foods Inc. will pay $1.5 million to more than 2,500 women and minorities to settle charges of job discrimination, the Labor Department said. The Springdale, Ark.-based company also agreed to hire 476 people from those classes as part of the settlement, the department said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Jennifer Jaff was on the brink of attending law school when her doctor tried to stop her because she had a debilitating chronic illness. "I decided I couldn't stay in bed the rest of my life," she later said. "I had to live. " Decades later she was a partner in a Connecticut law firm when the Crohn's disease that she had been diagnosed with as a teenager finally got in the way of her work as a trial lawyer. She started looking around and "found all these patients who had questions and needed help," she told the Hartford Courant last year.
NATIONAL
September 22, 2008 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Millions of Americans with diseases or impairments such as diabetes, epilepsy, heart disease, cancer and carpal tunnel syndrome will be protected from job discrimination under a new disability rights measure set to become law this week. The bill, five years in the making, won final passage in Congress last week, and President Bush said he would sign it. The measure overturns a series of Supreme Court rulings that sharply limited who was covered by the Americans With Disabilities Act.
NEWS
March 31, 1993 | From Associated Press
Gov. L. Douglas Wilder bucked the tobacco industry in one of the nation's top tobacco-producing states by vetoing a bill that would prohibit job discrimination against smokers. "It is creating a special class of people that would be given protections that others were not entitled to," Wilder said Tuesday after vetoing the measure the day before.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles) and conservative members of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors clashed angrily Tuesday over whether the county discriminates against Latinos in its hiring and promotion practices. Torres said that "discrimination occurs as a matter of rule rather than exception" in county employment. "We're always being told 'Where are these qualified Hispanic employees?' " Torres said. "It's not our responsibility to bring them to you.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1997 | KIRSTIN DOWNEY GRIMSLEY, WASHINGTON POST
Employment discrimination cases are surging into the federal courts in record numbers, more than doubling in the last four years because of new laws and new attitudes in the workplace. Employment experts cite new federal laws expanding civil-rights protections to sexual-harassment victims and the disabled; workers' and employers' turning increasingly combative; and a backlash against corporate downsizing, which left many workers feeling unfairly treated.
NEWS
November 4, 1991 | BARRY BEARAK and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
America's debt of conscience had become Brian Weber's account to settle. He was no racist. And to his mind, neither was his company. But suddenly blacks were being lifted over him on the seniority list. He was furious. The year was 1974, and Weber did not so much blame his employer, Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corp., as that familiar old meddler Uncle Sam. The government was pushing affirmative action as a sort of racial amends.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2006 | Marni Goldberg, Chicago Tribune
It's been nearly four years since Air National Guard employee Wynona James filed a claim with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. But she hasn't seen a dime of the $100,000 that was awarded to her. An administrative judge in Indianapolis last year found four Air National Guard supervisors guilty of "malicious retaliation" against James, who is black, by painting her as a terrorist. She hasn't heard anything about payment since the Air National Guard appealed the ruling in December.
OPINION
June 17, 2012
Even before President Obama endorsed same-sex marriage, that cause had become synonymous in many minds with gay rights. But an equally important item on the equality agenda is protection of gays, lesbians and transgender people from job discrimination. Last week the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions held a hearing on the proposed Employment Non-Discrimination Act, or ENDA, which would outlaw workplace discrimination on the basis of "actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity.
NATIONAL
June 18, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court heads into the last two weeks of its term Monday, facing a final round of decisions on matters as varied as violent video games, global warming, drug prescription records and alleged gender bias at Wal-Mart stores. In all, the justices are due to hand down decisions in 14 cases that have been argued since November. They will meet Monday and Thursday of this week to announce opinions. The remaining cases are set to be decided the following week. Here are the major cases pending: •Video games: The court will decide whether California and other states can limit the sale of ultra-violent video games to minors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2011 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
The sounds of Helen Reddy's 1972 anthem to the women's liberation movement, "I Am Woman," filled the Irvine hotel ballroom where several hundred participants gathered Saturday for the American Muslim Women's Empowerment Conference. The song selection was fitting because the message speakers gave was basically the same as it was four decades ago: Know your rights, and exercise them. But there was an added twist: By standing up for their rights inside and outside the home, American Muslim women can be a force against religious and political extremism.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
Brad Seligman is a determined civil rights lawyer with a small office and a powerful idea for turning a single lawsuit into a nationwide class action claim against America's largest employer. Armed with stories from several women who said they were passed over for promotions at Wal-Mart Stores Inc., Seligman is at the helm of what could be the largest job-discrimination case in U.S. history, affecting as many as two million women and putting at risk tens of billions of dollars of the company's money.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Supreme Court extended the reach of federal laws against job discrimination, ruling Tuesday that employees are protected from illegal bias not just from a top decision maker but from other supervisors as well. The justices said the crucial issue was whether illegal bias was a "motivating factor" in the decision to fire an employee. Companies and public agencies are not shielded from liability, they said, simply because the supervisor who made the decision to fire a worker did so for valid reasons.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2009 | Associated Press
A record number of workers filed federal job discrimination complaints last year, with claims by older employees of unfair treatment showing the largest increase. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said Wednesday that it received more than 95,000 discrimination claims during the 2008 fiscal year, a 15% increase over the previous year. Claims of age discrimination rose by 28.7%, with 24,582 claims, while allegations based on race, sex and retaliation also surged to record highs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1991 | DEAN E. MURPHY and VICTOR MERINA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
About 1,000 gay activists disrupted business from Rodeo Drive to Westwood Village Saturday in a continuing protest against Gov. Pete Wilson's veto of a bill that would have banned job discrimination against homosexuals. Chanting "Gay Rights Now!" and blowing whistles and horns, the marchers brought business to a standstill in the posh shops of Beverly Hills, Century City and Westwood, and jammed traffic on streets across the Westside.
NEWS
November 3, 1991 | BARRY BEARAK and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Then America was shaken from the long shame of its moral slumber. The year was 1964. Storms of protest battered at centuries of bigotry, and an epic civil rights bill finally emerged from Congress. There was to be an end to racial discrimination, the disgraceful crack in the Liberty Bell. The most momentous section of the legislation was Title VII. It barred bias in employment, which was a radical notion for a racist nation. Inequality had proven no easier to uproot than slavery.
NATIONAL
September 22, 2008 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Millions of Americans with diseases or impairments such as diabetes, epilepsy, heart disease, cancer and carpal tunnel syndrome will be protected from job discrimination under a new disability rights measure set to become law this week. The bill, five years in the making, won final passage in Congress last week, and President Bush said he would sign it. The measure overturns a series of Supreme Court rulings that sharply limited who was covered by the Americans With Disabilities Act.
OPINION
August 1, 2008
Re "Living with a reminder of segregation," July 27 The legacy of racially restrictive housing covenants is not just in a paragraph at the bottom of a contract, it's also in the makeup of the neighborhoods we live in today. In neighborhoods where redlining was once company policy, not enough has changed. For the many who don't understand the systemic origins of urban blight in Los Angeles and our nation's other great cities -- job discrimination, discriminatory lending and exclusionary covenants -- it is all too easy to deny our political and communal obligation to invest, include and integrate.
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