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Job Evaluation

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2013 | By Howard Blume
L.A. schools Supt. John Deasy received a positive job evaluation last month from the Board of Education by a vote of 5-1 with one member abstaining, the Los Angeles Unified School District announced Tuesday.  The district had previously refused to disclose the vote, but yielded this week, in an apparent response to a demand from The Times. Board members endorsing Deasy were board President Richard Vladovic, Steve Zimmer, Monica Garcia, Tamar Galatzan and Bennett Kayser. The opposing vote was cast by Marguerite Poindexter LaMotte.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2013 | By Howard Blume
L.A. schools Supt. John Deasy received a positive job evaluation last month from the Board of Education by a vote of 5-1 with one member abstaining, the Los Angeles Unified School District announced Tuesday.  The district had previously refused to disclose the vote, but yielded this week, in an apparent response to a demand from The Times. Board members endorsing Deasy were board President Richard Vladovic, Steve Zimmer, Monica Garcia, Tamar Galatzan and Bennett Kayser. The opposing vote was cast by Marguerite Poindexter LaMotte.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1999 | PATRICK MCGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J. Paul Brownridge said Thursday he will resign as Los Angeles city treasurer, four weeks after his salary was cut following a job evaluation that faulted him for lack of leadership and vision. Brownridge, one of the last of former Mayor Tom Bradley's managers, alleged in turn that a lack of direction and leadership by Mayor Richard Riordan has made it difficult for managers in the city. He also called his departure and that of several other top African American managers "disturbing."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Howard Blume
Los Angeles schools Supt. John Deasy, who has led the nation's second-largest school system since 2011, has told some top district officials that he could be leaving in coming months. Deasy declined to discuss his intentions Thursday evening, saying that he has not submitted a letter of resignation and that he would have more to say after his job evaluation Tuesday. But the office of Board of Education President Richard Vladovic said Vladovic was among those who'd spoken with the superintendent Thursday.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1985
Reason tells us there has been comparable worth discrimination in some jobs employing women ("Comparable Worth: Worthy Bid for Fairness," John F. Lawrence, May 19). That same reason tells us that traditional methods of job evaluation are not a sound basis for getting at the problem--if we understand how those methods work. Our problem, I believe, is: Those who make law and policy, and those who observe on the problem, simply will not get into the guts of those methods and understand their flaws in their new role.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2007 | Carolyn Bigda, Tribune Newspapers
The annual job review is a fact of life, whether welcome or not. But you could get more out of it than you might expect. A study from human resources consulting firm Hewitt Associates found that performance-related bonuses are expected to average more than 12% in 2008 -- a record high -- compared with 3.8% for base salary bumps. And studies show that many firms are in a pitched battle to hold on to their best employees. In its 2008 job forecast, CareerBuilder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1985 | LYNN O'SHAUGHNESSY, Times Staff Writer
Ray Jones, former director of the National Center on Deafness at California State University, Northridge, on Wednesday lost a court bid to get his job back. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Irving A. Shimer denied a request by Jones for a preliminary injunction that would have reinstated him in his former post while he pursues a $12-million age-discrimination lawsuit against the university.
NEWS
August 17, 1999 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ratcheting up the potential for a confrontation with city and schools officials, Los Angeles Unified School District Supt. Ruben Zacarias on Monday said he may seek to stay in the post five more years instead of the maximum two allowed under his current contract. He also did not rule out the possibility of negotiating with the Los Angeles Board of Education to have his next job evaluation conducted in public.
NEWS
June 4, 1995 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Juliet Ellery was the kind of teacher every student--and every parent--dreads. After 20 years in the classroom, the El Cajon teacher's best years seemed behind her. She hardly lectured any more. She gave baffling assignments. Not sure what to do? Tough. Got a question? Find the answer in the book. So, many students simply ignored her and spent her class period chatting, combing their hair, wandering around the room, according to court rulings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Howard Blume
Los Angeles schools Supt. John Deasy, who has led the nation's second-largest school system since 2011, has told some top district officials that he could be leaving in coming months. Deasy declined to discuss his intentions Thursday evening, saying that he has not submitted a letter of resignation and that he would have more to say after his job evaluation Tuesday. But the office of Board of Education President Richard Vladovic said Vladovic was among those who'd spoken with the superintendent Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2012 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles County Probation Department has not fulfilled seven federally ordered reforms at its youth camps. A report released late last week by federal monitors found that the agency still needs to improve staffing levels at some of its 14 camps, improve how it identifies youths who have mental problems and do a better job of evaluating and treating youths with medical problems, among other issues. The probation department, which houses and works to rehabilitate about 2,200 of the area's most troubled youths, has been under federal oversight for almost a decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2009 | Jason Song and Jason Felch
After listening to the debate at last week's Los Angeles school board meeting, business leader Carol Schatz said she was appalled. She had attended to support a resolution to speed the firing of teachers accused of serious crimes. But even this proposal -- tiptoeing on the margins of improving teacher quality -- generated heated objections from the teachers union and its supporters. With some last-minute amendments and sniping among board members, the resolution passed by a single vote.
WORLD
November 28, 2008 | times wire reports
Almost half of Mexican police officers examined this year have failed background and security tests, a figure that rises to nearly nine of 10 officers in the border state of Baja California, the government reported. Nationwide, 49% of officers scored "not recommendable" on the tests, compared with 42% that rated "recommendable." In Baja California, which includes Tijuana, a city riven by drug violence, about 89% failed, and only 4% were judged "recommendable." The tests -- which involved lie detectors, drug tests, psychological profiling and tests of personal wealth -- were intended to root out corrupt, incompetent and unfit officers.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2007 | Carolyn Bigda, Tribune Newspapers
The annual job review is a fact of life, whether welcome or not. But you could get more out of it than you might expect. A study from human resources consulting firm Hewitt Associates found that performance-related bonuses are expected to average more than 12% in 2008 -- a record high -- compared with 3.8% for base salary bumps. And studies show that many firms are in a pitched battle to hold on to their best employees. In its 2008 job forecast, CareerBuilder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2007 | Maura Dolan, Times Staff Writer
The "company man" hired and fired by the Bush administration as U.S. attorney in San Francisco was a loyal Republican the administration wanted to keep on -- until it appeared he could become a public relations liability. Unlike seven other fired federal prosecutors who may have run afoul of the administration for political reasons, San Francisco U.S. Atty. Kevin Ryan was a team player for Bush and had influential Republican support.
OPINION
January 6, 2007
Re "Job performance evaluations: The president," editorial, Dec. 31 Why would The Times, in its performance evaluation of President Bush, give him an "exceeds expectations" for financial management when he squandered a budget surplus from the previous administration, gave a lopsided tax cut to the wealthy, refused to pay for the war, sent the federal deficit to new heights and wants to take credit for the economy when the turnaround was the result...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1999 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Paul Pflueger was either one of those rare high school teachers who influenced hundreds of students to think critically for the first time or an unbearable bully tormenting vulnerable teenagers. Those contrasting portraits emerged at Monday's Capistrano Unified school board meeting, where 300 people packed the boardroom. After three hours of public hearings, the board voted to dismiss the 55-year-old Pflueger from the teaching job he held for 18 years at Capistrano Valley High School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2006 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday completed its annual performance evaluation of Police Chief William J. Bratton, concluding his work "exceeds standards" and giving him the maximum pay raise possible -- 5% -- a decision that bodes well for him getting another five-year term next year. Commission President John Mack said the panel is prohibited by personnel laws from providing details of where the chief has done well and where he might need improvement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2006 | From Times Staff Reports
The Los Angeles Police Commission met for three hours Tuesday in a closed-door session with Chief William J. Bratton as part of his annual performance evaluation. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, meanwhile, voiced confidence in the chief but asked the panel to judge Bratton based on whether he continues to reduce crime, increase the police force and comply with a consent decree mandating reforms. Emerging from the meeting, Bratton smiled and told reporters, "I think we did OK."
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