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Job Harriman

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February 14, 1988
We are writing a book on Job Harriman and the Llano del Rio Cooperative Colony to be published in early 1989. Harriman (1861-1925) was the West Coast's most prominent Socialist. He founded the Llano colony in the Mojave Desert in 1914 after narrowly losing the Los Angeles mayoral election in 1911. The colony lasted until 1918 in California, at which time it relocated in Louisiana and continued on through the Depression. For research purposes, we would appreciate hearing from any descendants of relatives of the original Llano colonists or of Harriman himself, as well as from anyone who might be knowledgeable about daily life in the Mojave colony.
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BOOKS
October 4, 1992
Every so often someone ridicules the Book Review's practice of printing letters from authors seeking information on their subject. Just thought you'd like to know that it works. Several years ago I read a letter from Nigey Lennon and Lionel Rolfe in the Book Review, asking for information on Job Harriman. I had some stuff, contacted them, and we had a pleasant afternoon together. Their book, "Bread and Hyacinths: The Rise and Fall of Utopian Los Angeles," has just been published.
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BOOKS
October 4, 1992
Every so often someone ridicules the Book Review's practice of printing letters from authors seeking information on their subject. Just thought you'd like to know that it works. Several years ago I read a letter from Nigey Lennon and Lionel Rolfe in the Book Review, asking for information on Job Harriman. I had some stuff, contacted them, and we had a pleasant afternoon together. Their book, "Bread and Hyacinths: The Rise and Fall of Utopian Los Angeles," has just been published.
BOOKS
February 14, 1988
We are writing a book on Job Harriman and the Llano del Rio Cooperative Colony to be published in early 1989. Harriman (1861-1925) was the West Coast's most prominent Socialist. He founded the Llano colony in the Mojave Desert in 1914 after narrowly losing the Los Angeles mayoral election in 1911. The colony lasted until 1918 in California, at which time it relocated in Louisiana and continued on through the Depression. For research purposes, we would appreciate hearing from any descendants of relatives of the original Llano colonists or of Harriman himself, as well as from anyone who might be knowledgeable about daily life in the Mojave colony.
NEWS
July 29, 1992 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
One of the odd pleasures of the California desert is the chance discovery of a ruin that harks back to some mysterious habitation of the distant past. "Four spectral pillars of native stone" in the high desert of the Antelope Valley are what prompted Paul Greenstein, Nigey Lennon and Lionel Rolfe to dig into California history and uncover the secrets of "a modern Stonehenge."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1997 | SCOTT HARRIS
Bring up the most melodramatic moment of "Chinatown" and Catherine Mulholland may well react with a hearty laugh. That's the scene in which a tearful Mrs. Mulwray is getting slapped around by private eye Jake Gittes as she explains the existence of a certain teenage girl. "She's my daughter." Slap! "My sister." Slap! And so on, until the startling revelation that she is both. The granddaughter of the legendary William Mulholland has a rich sense of humor.
OPINION
October 3, 2010 | By Lew Irwin
Shortly after 1 a.m. on Oct. 1, 1910, 100 years ago Friday, a time bomb constructed of 16 sticks of 80% dynamite connected to a cheap windup alarm clock exploded in an alley next to the Los Angeles Times. It detonated with such violence that for blocks around, people ran panic-stricken into the streets, believing that an intense earthquake had hit the city. The explosion destroyed the Times building, taking the lives of 20 employees, including the night city editor and the principal telegraph operator, and maiming dozens of others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1999 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a stretch of the Pearblossom Highway in the Antelope Valley sits a Salvador Dali-like landscape dotted with windowless walls, waterless pools and roofless public buildings. These structures made of field stone, cement and brick are remnants of a utopian community built from 1914 to 1918 and then abandoned almost overnight. On May 1st, the town--known as the Llano del Rio Cooperative--marks its 85th anniversary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1999 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
Long a decaying reminder of a former age's optimistic elegance, the Higgins Building on the southwest corner of 2nd and Main streets, currently being renovated, stands as one of downtown Los Angeles' temples of triumph and tragedy. When copper magnate Thomas Higgins built his 10-story showpiece in 1910, Main Street was an avenue of fine hotels, the city's best social clubs and theaters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1989 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, Times Staff Writer
Two men, father and son, make their way through a strange desert landscape of vegetation, garbage and stone. Tony Vacik and Tony Vacik Jr. stop in front of the squat stone towers that dominate the horizon near Pearblossom Highway in Llano del Rio, an unincorporated hamlet of 1,500. The towers--remnants of cobblestone pillars and chimneys around a concrete floor--resemble the abandoned temple of some desert god. Twenty miles west of Llano are the Antelope Valley boom towns of Palmdale and Lancaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2006 | David L. Ulin, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles is commonly regarded as a city people come to, but there's much more to it than that. For better than a century, it's also been a place that people come from -- even when (as so often happens) they were born somewhere else. Indeed, L.A. is synonymous with personality, whether frivolous or tragic or profound. Here, we celebrate 10 Angelenos who, by dint of either action or circumstance, helped change the way we understand the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2006 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
In the early 20th century, part of Los Angeles' golden era was founded on copper. Take the Higgins Building at 2nd and Main streets. The 10-story showpiece was built in 1910 by copper tycoon Thomas Higgins. Its marble walls and brass fittings mirrored the glamour of pre-World War I downtown. Tenants included Clarence Darrow, General Petroleum, the chancery office of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles and noted architect Albert C. Martin Sr.
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