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BUSINESS
July 15, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Here is a roundup of alleged cons, frauds and schemes to watch out for. Affordable Care Act - President Obama's Affordable Care Act has opened the door to a new wave of frauds, the Federal Trade Commission said in a recent bulletin. People have been making unsolicited telephone calls to U.S. residents, asking for personal information and credit card numbers that the callers say would help the residents receive coverage under the healthcare law. If consumers receive calls from people who claim to be from the government and ask for personal information, such as name, Social Security number or birth date, they should hang up immediately, the FTC said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 14, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
Facebook is launching a new app to help its users in the United States hunt for jobs. A year ago Facebook teamed up with the U.S. Department of Labor, the National Assn. of Colleges and Employers, the Direct Employers Assn. and the National Assn. of State Workforce Agencies to form the Social Jobs Partnership. At the time, the coalition promised to roll out a free app that would connect job seekers with open positions. Now with unemployment still stubbornly high and the economy sluggish, Facebook and companies that list jobs on Facebook including Branchout, JobVite and Work4 Labs have pulled together more than 1.7 million job postings in the U.S. in one spot.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1986
The other weekend, as I went job hunting, I became very frustrated and upset. I noticed that I was given a very common response from many of the employees and managers where I sought work. This response became very annoying after so many attempts to apply. When I asked, "Are you accepting applications?" Their response was, "Are you 18 and do you have experience?" Of course my answer was no. After all, I'm only 15 1/2 and this is my first job. It really is annoying for someone my age looking for a job. I feel that if people are that determined to get a job they should at least be given the chance.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Here is a roundup of alleged cons, frauds and schemes to watch out for. Affordable Care Act - President Obama's Affordable Care Act has opened the door to a new wave of frauds, the Federal Trade Commission said in a recent bulletin. People have been making unsolicited telephone calls to U.S. residents, asking for personal information and credit card numbers that the callers say would help the residents receive coverage under the healthcare law. If consumers receive calls from people who claim to be from the government and ask for personal information, such as name, Social Security number or birth date, they should hang up immediately, the FTC said.
OPINION
May 12, 1991
Unfortunately, the present recession has hit all of us very hard. I am one of many who is unemployed. I have been unsuccessful in obtaining employment. Is there a reason why, when prospective employees respond to a job advertisement in writing, the employer cannot respond promptly in kind? I have spent countless amounts of time, effort and money to mail resumes to various "blind" and advertised companies, awaiting patiently a response of some kind and getting nothing. Prospective employer: I need to work, and it would be appreciated if you could respond one way or another once my resume is sent to you. While patience is indeed a virtue, it is not during a recession.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2009 | Tiffany Hsu
Their savings in shambles from the economic downturn, jobless seniors are dusting off their briefcases and trying to head back to work. Many, like Jim Mitchell, a 63-year-old former sales executive, are finding a merciless job market where decades of experience aren't necessarily an asset. The Long Beach resident rises daily before dawn and dresses neatly in business attire to keep himself motivated.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1991 | ANNE GREGOR
Getting a great job has never been easy, but with unemployment and the recession lingering like a summer cold, it's more of a challenge than ever. It's not impossible, though. The experts--people who hire, for example--say job hunting now is an art form demanding tenacity, imagination, flexibility and a willingness to consider alternatives. Start with a success story: Two years ago, Melinda Walker did what many have done before her.
SPORTS
April 9, 1993 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Job hunting is never an easy task for a man Scott Sanderson's age. When you've been in a business as long as Sanderson has, you prefer things ordered and simple. But along came the winter of 1992-93 and free agency, which could have brought all sorts of turmoil to Sanderson's life. Things have been up in the air before and Sanderson has been able to yank it all back to earth rather quickly. He's not one to enter into a new situation without doing a little homework.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2012 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
California's labor market continued its slow improvement in March as employers added jobs for the eighth straight month. Payrolls grew by 18,200 jobs last month, according to figures released Friday by the California Employment Development Department. That's on top of a revised gain of 38,600 jobs in February. The unemployment rate increased to 11% in March, up slightly from February's 10.9% rate. Improved employment prospects have encouraged more idled California workers to start job hunting again, driving the unemployment rate higher, said Dennis Meyers, principal economist for the state's Department of Finance.
NEWS
January 2, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yulia wanted work as an accountant. So she pulled on a tight green miniskirt, squeezed into saucy high heels and pranced onto the stage of a hotel ballroom one recent night, batting her lashes and swinging her hips as she tried to win a job balancing books. Nearby danced Valeria, hopeful of landing a managerial post. Also Irina, in body-hugging white, her law school courses all but forgotten as she flirted behind a cat-eye mask and dreamed of finding secretarial work. Music boomed.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2012 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
California's labor market continued its slow improvement in March as employers added jobs for the eighth straight month. Payrolls grew by 18,200 jobs last month, according to figures released Friday by the California Employment Development Department. That's on top of a revised gain of 38,600 jobs in February. The unemployment rate increased to 11% in March, up slightly from February's 10.9% rate. Improved employment prospects have encouraged more idled California workers to start job hunting again, driving the unemployment rate higher, said Dennis Meyers, principal economist for the state's Department of Finance.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2012 | By Alejandro Lazo
California employers added 4,000 new payroll jobs last month , signaling slow but steady improvement in the state's labor market. Despite the gains, the unemployment rate remain unchanged at 10.9% as more workers dusted off their resumes to look for employment. “People are more encouraged to find jobs,” said Stephen Levy, an economist with the Center for the Continuing Study of the California Economy . “As people come into the workforce it's going to take a while to get the unemployment rate down.” Statewide, the biggest job gains last month were found in sectors that pay better than average wages - another positive sign for the California economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2010 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
More than two years after the last permanent chief of Los Angeles County's massive Department of Health Services quit unexpectedly, officials may finally be close to hiring a replacement. Los Angeles county's chief executive, William T Fujioka, said Monday that he believes he has identified the right person to lead the $3.4-billion-a-year operation: Dr. Mitchell H. Katz, the director of health for the city and county of San Francisco. "Given the system that he runs in San Francisco and the similarities in both the mission and the type of services provided, he would be an outstanding candidate," Fujioka said.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2010 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Private employers added a smaller-than-expected 83,000 jobs in June, but the unemployment rate edged down to 9.5% as many workers dropped out of a labor market that remains very sluggish. The Labor Department reported Friday that total payroll employment, including government workers, was down 125,000 in June, reflecting the loss of 225,000 census workers who finished their assignments. The decrease in Census Bureau staffing was expected, but most analysts were looking for stronger job growth in the private sector, which has yet to generate momentum and looms as a major threat to the overall economic recovery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2010 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
Michelle WallowingBull was born a boy. But growing up on Wyoming's Wind River Indian Reservation, she knew from age 5 that she was a girl inside. As a teen she bounced from the reservation to a South Dakota town to foster homes and back. In these remote communities, with a family steeped in addiction, she said, it was difficult to openly express the gender she deeply felt. Substance abuse and economic uncertainty followed — travails all too common for transgender people. But last week, WallowingBull worked the room at a job fair organized by San Francisco's Transgender Economic Empowerment Initiative, a pioneering program that has received an outpouring of public support in recent weeks as it faces possible elimination of city funding.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2009 | TIMES STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
Just one typo in a resume could cost you a job, according to a recent survey. Three out of four executives said one or two inadvertent strokes of the keyboard would remove an applicant from consideration for a job, and 40% said they wouldn't hire a candidate who had a typo in a resume. The telephone survey of 1,000 senior executives was conducted on behalf of staffing firm Accountemps, a unit of Robert Half International Inc. "Employers view the resume as a reflection of the applicant," said Max Messmer, chairman of Accountemps and author of "Job Hunting for Dummies."
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