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Job Insecurity

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SPORTS
March 29, 2009 | Dylan Hernandez
For the first time in his big league career, Andre Ethier knows where he stands. He's the Dodgers' starting right fielder. But he appears to take little comfort in that. However much Manager Joe Torre makes the stability of his situation clear -- he went as far as to call a one-on-one meeting to remind the player of that last week -- Ethier's demeanor remains largely unchanged from last spring. That's when he, Matt Kemp and Juan Pierre were competing for two spots in the outfield.
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NEWS
March 15, 2011 | By Tami Dennis, Tribune Health
Unemployment doesn't do much for one's mental health. No surprise there. But a lousy job -- defined as a position with no control, job insecurity, terrible pay -- takes much the same toll. A new study published in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine confirmed that, overall, the unemployed do fare worse -- mentally -- than the employed.  But it also found that the unemployed fare about the same, if not better, than people with "poor quality" jobs. In fact, unemployed workers who were able to find a job sometimes found themselves in a worse mental state.
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BUSINESS
May 7, 2001 | PIERRE BELEC, REUTERS
If Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan is counting on the consumer to bail out the ailing American economy, his chances of success increasingly appear dicey, some analysts say. The betting in some quarters is the Fed may not be able to keep the Great American Spending Machine fired up because the job market is beginning to scare a lot of people. Those concerns were amplified Friday, when the government reported that the U.S.
OPINION
June 30, 2010
Even in good times, teachers with little experience have a hard job at low-achieving schools with disadvantaged students. They don't get paid much, and the students are more challenging to teach. And these aren't good times. Job insecurity is a serious problem. Teachers are laid off in order of seniority, so the newest teachers lose their jobs first. The situation is even harder on students. Because low-performing schools tend to be staffed by newer teachers, students don't get the benefit of experienced instructors — and then they lose more of their teachers during layoffs.
SPORTS
September 16, 2006 | Robyn Norwood, Times Staff Writer
Win a national championship. Then wait. Less than a decade after being hoisted on players' shoulders -- a mere five years, even -- some coaches are sitting on an uncomfortably warm seat, their futures the subject of endless talk-radio debate, Internet message board rants and newspaper columns. Consider Lloyd Carr. His 1997 Michigan team shared the national championship with Nebraska. But his 2005 team went 7-5, and the posters at www.sackcarr.com are poised to pounce if No.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1999 | From Reuters
The rapidly changing economy has raised worries about job losses among U.S. workers, even though the labor market is extremely tight, Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan said Tuesday. "The rapidity of change in our capital assets, the infrastructure with which all workers must interface day by day, has clearly raised the level of anxiety and insecurity in the work force," Greenspan told the American Council on Education.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1999 | DON LEE and NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Documenting a dark side to California's economic resurgence this decade, a new report argues that the state's technology-driven boom has brought increasing economic insecurity for most workers. The report, being released today by two liberal groups and with tacit support of key California legislators, details how California's economy has emerged in recent years as a preeminent force in the new information-technology economy.
NEWS
September 4, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As major U.S. companies race to merge in a record flurry of multibillion-dollar transactions, the justifications for each deal are virtually identical: a desire for new synergies, a need to cut costs, a rush to reach a size that begets a greater sense of market control. But where does this leave the average American?
OPINION
December 18, 2004
Re "County Pensions Examined for Abuse," Dec. 14: It is hard to believe that nearly three-quarters of Los Angeles County firefighters and lifeguards are disabled, considering that they were in superior physical and mental condition when they were hired. Most only have to work until they are in their early 50s, an age the average person is still in good health. A person who retires on Social Security has to work about 45 years, usually with less favorable working conditions than the above county employees.
HEALTH
August 25, 2008 | Susan Brink
In industries where pink slips are being passed out with abandon, the still-employed survivors are getting pretty bummed out. Even Christopher Ruhm, an economist known for arguing that recessions are good for physical health, draws the line at hard times being good for mental health. "I'm not claiming that people are mentally healthier during bad times," says Ruhm, professor of economics at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. "It's quite possible that mental and physical health go in opposite directions.
SPORTS
March 29, 2009 | Dylan Hernandez
For the first time in his big league career, Andre Ethier knows where he stands. He's the Dodgers' starting right fielder. But he appears to take little comfort in that. However much Manager Joe Torre makes the stability of his situation clear -- he went as far as to call a one-on-one meeting to remind the player of that last week -- Ethier's demeanor remains largely unchanged from last spring. That's when he, Matt Kemp and Juan Pierre were competing for two spots in the outfield.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2009 | David Pierson
Wedding photographer Pogos Kuregyan has lowered his prices. FedEx aircraft inspector Dan Wallace is dealing with a salary cut and a retirement fund that's lost half its value. Though prices are down for food, housing, energy and clothing, they can't buy much, because they're living on less. After years of worrying about inflation, some economists fear the opposite could soon happen: deflation, an extended period of falling prices that indicates the economy is in a backward spiral.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2008 | Joyce M. Rosenberg, The Associated Press
Robert Fellman can see it on his employees' faces: the fear, stress and discomfort that come from a difficult, even scary, economic climate. "There's panic in their eyes," said Fellman, director of PC Professor, a computer training company with offices in Boca Raton and West Palm Beach, Fla. He also hears it when they reassure him that they'll do whatever it takes to keep their jobs: "If there's anything you need done, I'll accept the criticism, just let me know" is what he hears from staffers.
NEWS
September 1, 2008 | Leo Hindery Jr., Leo Hindery Jr. is currently managing partner of a New York-based media industry private equity fund. He chairs the Smart Globalization Initiative at the New America Foundation and is an unofficial economic advisor to Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama.
Not all that long ago, America's prominent business and government leaders widely believed that our nation's prosperity depended on a strong middle class growing from the bottom up. Workers were rewarded for their hard work with fair wages, benefits and advancement opportunities -- and our economy and our national security were much stronger for it. Henry Ford certainly knew this, and often said that his company would prosper only if his workers...
HEALTH
August 25, 2008 | Susan Brink
In industries where pink slips are being passed out with abandon, the still-employed survivors are getting pretty bummed out. Even Christopher Ruhm, an economist known for arguing that recessions are good for physical health, draws the line at hard times being good for mental health. "I'm not claiming that people are mentally healthier during bad times," says Ruhm, professor of economics at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. "It's quite possible that mental and physical health go in opposite directions.
SPORTS
September 16, 2006 | Robyn Norwood, Times Staff Writer
Win a national championship. Then wait. Less than a decade after being hoisted on players' shoulders -- a mere five years, even -- some coaches are sitting on an uncomfortably warm seat, their futures the subject of endless talk-radio debate, Internet message board rants and newspaper columns. Consider Lloyd Carr. His 1997 Michigan team shared the national championship with Nebraska. But his 2005 team went 7-5, and the posters at www.sackcarr.com are poised to pounce if No.
NEWS
March 15, 2011 | By Tami Dennis, Tribune Health
Unemployment doesn't do much for one's mental health. No surprise there. But a lousy job -- defined as a position with no control, job insecurity, terrible pay -- takes much the same toll. A new study published in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine confirmed that, overall, the unemployed do fare worse -- mentally -- than the employed.  But it also found that the unemployed fare about the same, if not better, than people with "poor quality" jobs. In fact, unemployed workers who were able to find a job sometimes found themselves in a worse mental state.
OPINION
June 30, 2010
Even in good times, teachers with little experience have a hard job at low-achieving schools with disadvantaged students. They don't get paid much, and the students are more challenging to teach. And these aren't good times. Job insecurity is a serious problem. Teachers are laid off in order of seniority, so the newest teachers lose their jobs first. The situation is even harder on students. Because low-performing schools tend to be staffed by newer teachers, students don't get the benefit of experienced instructors — and then they lose more of their teachers during layoffs.
OPINION
December 18, 2004
Re "County Pensions Examined for Abuse," Dec. 14: It is hard to believe that nearly three-quarters of Los Angeles County firefighters and lifeguards are disabled, considering that they were in superior physical and mental condition when they were hired. Most only have to work until they are in their early 50s, an age the average person is still in good health. A person who retires on Social Security has to work about 45 years, usually with less favorable working conditions than the above county employees.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2004 | Debora Vrana, Times Staff Writer
The nation's largest merchants, hoping to ring up big sales during the crucial back-to-school season, got taken to school instead. Retailers on Thursday reported disappointing sales in August, the third straight month of sluggish business, as high gasoline prices and job insecurity cut into family spending, analysts said. Overall, retail sales rose just 1.1% at stores open at least a year, the smallest gain in a year and a half, according to the International Council of Shopping Centers.
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