Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJob Loss
IN THE NEWS

Job Loss

NEWS
February 11, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
On the heels of an uprising by rookie Republican lawmakers, House leaders Friday will unveil a new budget proposal that instructs appropriators to slice deeper to reduce the 2011 budget by the $100 billion the GOP promised voters last fall. The new proposal is expected to produce steep cuts and may require job losses in government agencies, putting some elected officials in the difficult position of choosing between fiscal austerity or employment opportunity as the nation continues to struggle with high unemployment during the economic recovery.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
January 19, 2011 | By Noam N. Levey, Washington Bureau
?In their campaign to repeal the healthcare overhaul President Obama signed last year, Republicans have leveled two sweeping critiques of the new law: its impact on the job market and on the federal budget deficit. Here is a run-down of how some of the rhetoric matches up with reality. Why do Republicans say the law will "kill" jobs? Many businesses will face new regulations, including rules dictating that their health plans eliminate lifetime limits, wave co-pays for preventive care and allow parents to keep children up to age 26 on their policies.
NATIONAL
January 18, 2011 | By Noam N. Levey, Washington Bureau
In their campaign to repeal the healthcare overhaul President Obama signed last year, Republicans have leveled two sweeping critiques of the law: its impact on the job market and on the federal budget deficit. Here's a rundown of how some of the rhetoric matches up with reality. Why do Republicans say the law will kill jobs? Many businesses will face new regulations, including rules dictating that their health plans eliminate lifetime limits, waive co-payments for preventive care and allow parents to keep children as old as 26 on their policies.
BUSINESS
January 3, 2011 | By John Gallagher
Detroit and other Rust Belt cities hoping to reverse decades of decline are finding new inspiration in unexpected places: the older industrial cities of Europe. In recent weeks, leaders from Detroit, Cleveland and other Midwest cities have traveled to Europe as part of a Cities in Transition exchange. One trip, which came after a visit to Turin, Italy, took leaders to Leipzig, Germany, and Manchester, England. All three cities are reversing decades of job losses and population decline.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2010 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
California's deeply troubled labor market took another hit in August as employers laid off more workers than expected, renewing fears that the state's economic recovery has stalled. Employers cut 33,500 jobs, marking the third straight month of losses and pushing the state's unemployment rate to 12.4%, up from 12.3% in July, according to data released Friday by the Employment Development Department. California has lost 113,100 jobs since August 2009. Last month's losses were widespread, hitting almost all sectors, including construction, manufacturing, financial services, leisure and hospitality, trade, transportation and utilities.
NATIONAL
September 2, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
A majority of people who were able to find work after being laid off during the recession say they are overqualified for their current position, according to a survey released by the Pew Research Center. Nearly one-third of the nation's 139 million employed workers has suffered a job loss since December 2007, according to the survey. Of the reemployed workers, 54% say they are overqualified for their current post, versus 36% who weren't unemployed during the recession. "Jobs that you might pass earlier you begin taking just to be able to work," said Rich Morin, a senior editor with the center and author of the study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2010 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Employee furloughs, federal funds and cost-cutting measures are saving nearly 2,500 jobs in the Los Angeles Unified School District, officials said this week. Despite that qualified good news, 682 teachers and professional "support personnel" still face losing their positions June 30, a much smaller number than the 3,090 who received notices March 15 that they could be laid off. Many layoffs were prevented because schools used new authority over their budgets to rehire some staff members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt
Debate over the economic effects of California's first-in-the-nation global warming law flared this week, with a report saying short-term job losses can be expected. The state's nonpartisan legislative analyst's office examined 2008 economic modeling by the California Air Resources Board and concluded that it "may overstate the number of jobs" attributable to future implementation of the 2006 climate law. While acknowledging the uncertainty of such projections, the report said, "On balance, however, we believe that the aggregate net jobs impact in the near term is likely to be negative, even after recognizing that many of the . . . programs phase in over time."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2010
Dear Amy: We recently learned that my husband would likely be laid off within a month. My husband is devastated; in addition to the impact this has had on his professional ego, he feels he's letting his family down by not being able to support us until he finds another job. I have tried to reassure him that this is a chance to get a job he will love. His paycheck is not what makes him the amazing father and husband he is. Is there anything else I could do? Concerned Wife Dear Wife: One unfortunate aspect of the current unemployment situation is that men are losing their jobs at a disproportionally high rate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2010 | By Bettina Boxall
When California Sen. Dianne Feinstein drafted legislation that would weaken endangered species protections to deliver more water to San Joaquin Valley farms, her rationale was jobs. "People in California's breadbasket face complete economic ruin," the Democrat said in a recent statement. She was joining a chorus of Central Valley politicians and farm groups that during the last year have painted the region as a dust bowl, beset by drought and environmental protections that are cutting vital water deliveries and the jobs that depend on them.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|