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Job Promotions

BUSINESS
December 22, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Janella Sue Martin--who gained national attention after winning a $20-million jury award in a sex discrimination suit against Texaco only to have a judge toss out the decision--has settled her dispute for a sum believed to be less than $2 million. Both sides were under court orders not to discuss the settlement, but sources familiar with the case said Thursday that the pact also calls for Martin, now on paid administrative leave from Texaco, to soon give up her job with the oil company.
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BUSINESS
December 7, 1995 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most women still haven't risen above the "glass ceiling," but three companies on Wednesday were recognized for at least helping some break through. Hoechst Celanese Corp., Knight-Ridder Inc. and Texas Instruments Inc. won the 1996 Catalyst Award for their efforts to promote women within their corporate structures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1995 | BETH SHUSTER
Manny Rangel, the assistant principal at Sun Valley Middle School, was promoted Friday to be the school principal--a move that ended nearly four months of dissatisfaction at the northeast Valley school. Supt. Sid Thompson said he made the appointment the day after the board approved a new hiring policy designed to allow schools like Sun Valley to promote administrators who have not yet taken a required exam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1995 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clearing the way for Sun Valley Middle School to hire a new principal, the Los Angeles Board of Education agreed Thursday to give schools operating under the district's reform programs greater latitude in selecting administrators. The board, on a 6-0 vote, loosened district hiring guidelines by allowing nearly 300 schools to hire principals regardless of whether they have passed a required administrative exam.
NEWS
August 12, 1995 | Associated Press
Lawrence Summers, undersecretary of the Treasury for international affairs, was confirmed Friday to the department's No. 2 post despite controversy over his handling of Mexico's financial crisis last year. The Senate voted, 74 to 21, in favor of Summers' promotion.
NEWS
July 18, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anger within the ranks of the Central Intelligence Agency apparently has flared over a decision by Director John M. Deutch to give a prized overseas assignment to a senior official touched by the Aldrich H. Ames spy scandal, agency sources said Monday. Some CIA officers fear that the assignment may be an early sign that Deutch is unwilling to live up to his promise to shake up the agency's insular, old-boy culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1995
Orange County Sheriff's Lt. Dan Martini, who has served as the agency's spokesman for the past two years, has been promoted to captain and will be commander of the Orange County Men's Jail. Martini, 46, has worked for the department for two decades. He served briefly as a spokesman for the county during the early stages of the bankruptcy crisis and said the knowledge he gained will be relevant to commanding the jail under increasing budget constraints.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1995 | DIANE SEO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter Avillanoza considered calling in sick the day a deadly bomb exploded at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. But the former housing investigator in Orange, who less than a month ago began working as a director at the U.S. Housing and Urban Development offices in Oklahoma City, brushed aside his wife's concerns about his health and went to work. Now, Avillanoza, 56, is on the list of those missing in the rubble.
MAGAZINE
February 5, 1995 | Ronald J. Ostrow, Ronald J. Ostrow covers the Justice Department for The Times. His last article for the magazine was a profile of Atty. Gen. Janet Reno
Hands plunged deep into the pants pockets of his blue suit, Louis J. Freeh stands before the agents and support staff of the Indianapolis field office of the FBI, laying out his vision of their future. His accent is thick--"the law" rhymes with "the drawer"--and with his flat "Just the facts, ma'am" tone, he sounds astonishingly like Joe Friday of TV's "Dragnet," if Sgt. Friday had hailed from New Jersey. Standing 5-foot-8, Freeh does not tower over the lectern like Wayne R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1995 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A woman who once headed the Sybil Brand Institute for Women was promoted to chief in the county Sheriff's Department on Wednesday, the first woman to hold that rank. Helena Ashby, a 31-year-veteran of the department, was one of four new chiefs named Wednesday. Ashby, 53, said the department has changed its attitude toward women significantly since she began her career. "Women now have access to all jobs," Ashby said. "The world has changed and so has the position of women in the department.
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