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Job Requirement

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BUSINESS
March 23, 1997
Q: I am a rather new employee, still learning all of the functions of my new position. On a day-to-day basis I am required to work with about 20 other employees, often completing tasks for them. I don't mind going above and beyond the call of duty; however, there are only so many hours in the day. My question is how do I determine if what they are asking me to do is actually part of my job requirement?
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OPINION
December 3, 2013 | By Tamar Jacoby
Instead of going through Congress and making the initiative bipartisan, President Obama acted alone in mid-November, promising $100 million in grants to specialized high schools - such as New York City's Pathways in Technology Early College High School - that prepare students for technical careers. The president's on the right track, but why make it partisan? Schools like P-TECH are an idea whose time has come - one that can be adopted by both parties and by business as well as government.
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SPORTS
January 22, 1998 | J.A. ADANDE
Away from the circus that is Media Day, on the fringe of the playing field that will host Super Bowl XXXII, Mark Collins talked business. Not that cliche-ridden stuff like "we have to take care of business on Sunday." Business. Some words about dollars and some things that didn't make sense, from a man who sometimes fires people and has been fired himself, a man whose current job pays him to do nothing.
SPORTS
November 5, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
You don't know Bob Romanski, but if you've watched an NFL game in the last 33 years you've seen his work. That's because any player who has worn the silver and black of the Raiders during that time was outfitted - from shoelaces to shoulder pads, jockstrap to chin strap - by Romanski, the team's equipment manager since the final days of the Carter administration. And that's just the most visible part of his job "It's from A to Z what you do," Romanski says. "There's times where you're working on a helmet radio system for practice and then a couple of hours later you could be tailoring a pair of pants.
NEWS
October 25, 1985 | MARYLOU LUTHER
Question: I have been promoted to a supervisory position over about 50 employees. The position has never been held by a woman and never by a person as young as I. (I'm 27, 5-foot-5 and wear a Size 9.) Knowing that I will be met with opposition, I want to dress with a style that spells professionalism. The clothes also have to have a carefree feeling so that I am comfortable wearing them. The job requires bending and lifting so dresses are not suitable. Shoes, by regulation, must have a low heel.
OPINION
April 20, 2003 | William Shawcross, William Shawcross is the author of "Deliver Us From Evil: Warlords, Peacekeepers and a World of Endless Conflict."
I heard a neoconservative joke recently. A Frenchman, a German and an American were all facing a firing squad in Africa and each was given a final wish. The Frenchman asked to sing the "Marseillaise"; the German asked to give a lecture on the use of force and international law. The American said: "Please, please shoot me first. I don't want to have to hear that lecture -- or that song."
SPORTS
January 2, 1999 | ROBYN NORWOOD and MAL FLORENCE
USC looked terribly unprepared in its Sun Bowl loss to Texas Christian, but give Coach Paul Hackett credit for knowing what not to say. Larry Smith famously said "names and logos don't mean anything" anymore after USC lost to Fresno State in the 1992 Freedom Bowl, and was fired soon after. Hackett entered a makeshift interview room after the game Thursday in El Paso, eyeing the chair where he was to sit. "Is this the electric chair?" he asked.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1994
Question: I have recently filled out an application for federal employment (SF 171), and one of the first items asked for was my date of birth. Is it legal to require this information on an application form? --A.H., Irvine Answer: It is normally improper to ask a person's age on an employment application as it is considered good evidence of age discrimination. However, there are exceptions to that rule.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1993
Councilman Art Bloomer announced Tuesday that he is resigning at the end of the month and moving to Virginia. Bloomer, 60, has served on the council for three years. His resignation is effective July 1. Bloomer said he recently was promoted to executive vice president of American Protective Services, which required the move. As a seven-year resident of Irvine, Bloomer served on the city's Finance and Public Safety commissions before being elected to the council in 1990.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2006 | Marla Dickerson and Meredith Mandell, Special to The Times
When Michigan-based automotive supplier Lear Corp. needed a secretary for its office in the central Mexican state of Guanajuato, it placed a classified ad seeking a "female ... aged 20 to 28 ... preferably single ... with excellent presentation." And to ensure that it got the right candidate, Lear asked applicants to include a recent photo with their resumes. In the United States, that ad might draw howls of protest and trigger lawsuits and hefty fines.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Once considered one of the most powerful and sought-after positions in Hollywood, running Walt Disney Studios - the 89-year-old Burbank institution behind "Snow White," "Mary Poppins" and "Pirates of the Caribbean" - now seems about as desirable as playing Goofy on a hot day at Disneyland. But since Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Bob Iger fired his studio head Rich Ross last week, the buzz in Hollywood has been less about who's angling for the studio chairman job and more about who would want it. The reason: Iger's strategy of turning Disney into a collection of brands means that most of the films it releases are not overseen or greenlighted by the movie studio chief, as they are at rival companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2011 | By Paul Pringle and Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
As finance director for the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, Ronald Lederkramer didn't need to do much driving to keep an eye on the stadium's books. But he has charged taxpayers about $7,600 for gasoline since 2008, even for fill-ups near Las Vegas and in Florida and New York. That was enough to drive about 12,000 miles annually in his Infiniti and his Jaguar, which he leased mostly at the public's expense. And on Lederkramer's watch, four other stadium administrators racked up similar bills on the Coliseum's Exxon Mobil account, according to receipts obtained through the California Public Records Act. The managers' jobs required only occasional car trips, typically to nearby destinations such as Staples Center or City Hall, Coliseum officials have said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2009 | Joel Rubin
Who knew the badge, the holster and the iconic dark blue threads worn by Los Angeles police officers could make punching the clock so complicated? A federal judge ruled this week that Los Angeles Police Department officers should be paid for the time it takes them to put on and take off their uniforms and safety equipment, a decision that could cost the city millions of dollars in back pay and higher salaries. In a 39-page ruling, U.S.
SPORTS
June 5, 2008 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
NEW YORK -- Big Brown, who has had success starting from the outside, will test the inside in Saturday's $1-million Belmont Stakes. Big Brown, attempting to become the first horse to win the Triple Crown in 30 years, got post position No. 1 in Wednesday's draw at Belmont Park and was installed as the 2-5 favorite. Big Brown won the Kentucky Derby from the 20th and outside post and the Florida Derby from the 11th and outside post. So the rail wasn't what trainer Rick Dutrow Jr. wanted.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2007 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
A FEW years after retiring to this Pacific resort city, David Bender was bored with golf. His new hobby, the American decided, would be tackling Mexico's income inequality. He would do it by teaching English to Mexican children. Never mind that Mexico didn't ask for his help. Or that the former advertising executive knew nothing about running a school. Bender saw working families hungry for affordable English-language instruction and a shot at upward mobility for their kids.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2006 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
Jorge Guzman looked at the photograph of the Asian girl with concern and revulsion. The child looked about 8 years old. Her arms were tied together, and so were her legs, and a man was having sex with her. "There are some things in this world that are not meant to be seen," Guzman said. "This was one of them." Guzman makes his living looking at photographs like this, trolling the gutter of child pornography in cyberspace. He heads a computer forensics team of U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2003 | Nora Zamichow, Times Staff Writer
As Annie Lever padded along a sun-scorched trail at Runyon Canyon, a yellow Labrador, a Gordon setter and a golden retriever sprinted ahead. A 5-pound Maltese dashed in the dust by Lever's sneakers, and two chocolate Labradors and a pit bull mix plodded behind. "Are they all yours?" one hiker gulped. Not exactly. Lever, 46, is a professional dog walker who earns $150,000 a year -- enough to buy a Brentwood condominium, decorated in tones of taupe, green and cream, and a Steinway piano.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1989 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
Forecasting the economy can be a lonely business. Just ask Larry J. Kimbell. The UCLA professor still looks pained when he recalls the time he warned California Gov. Jerry Brown of a recession. Brown--who had hoped for a favorable forecast to back up his spending plans--was disappointed. He responded with a pointed question: Did Kimbell want university faculty members to have a pay raise that year?
BUSINESS
October 23, 2006 | Marla Dickerson and Meredith Mandell, Special to The Times
When Michigan-based automotive supplier Lear Corp. needed a secretary for its office in the central Mexican state of Guanajuato, it placed a classified ad seeking a "female ... aged 20 to 28 ... preferably single ... with excellent presentation." And to ensure that it got the right candidate, Lear asked applicants to include a recent photo with their resumes. In the United States, that ad might draw howls of protest and trigger lawsuits and hefty fines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2003 | Nora Zamichow, Times Staff Writer
As Annie Lever padded along a sun-scorched trail at Runyon Canyon, a yellow Labrador, a Gordon setter and a golden retriever sprinted ahead. A 5-pound Maltese dashed in the dust by Lever's sneakers, and two chocolate Labradors and a pit bull mix plodded behind. "Are they all yours?" one hiker gulped. Not exactly. Lever, 46, is a professional dog walker who earns $150,000 a year -- enough to buy a Brentwood condominium, decorated in tones of taupe, green and cream, and a Steinway piano.
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