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Job Requirements

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1997 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least 27 Metropolitan Transportation Authority police officers failed background checks by the Los Angeles Police Department, and an additional 20 may also do so, casting new doubts on the months-long negotiations to merge the two law enforcement agencies, officials said Wednesday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
When amateur filmmaker Tom Berninger's rock-star brother Matt, frontman for Brooklyn quintet the National, invited him to be a roadie on his band's biggest tour, Tom had never even been on a tour bus. His lack of experience did not serve him well during his initiation into the business, but a funny thing happened on the way to the concert hall: Tom turned defeat into a documentary that's insightful, sweet and often hilarious. In "Mistaken for Strangers," a fresh revamp of the music-doc template, the National's angsty songs are mere backdrop to a story whose true subjects are sibling love and rivalry and the thorny matter of creative success - here explored through the tension between achievement and striving, or, as one observer puts it, alpha male versus underdog.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2005 | Wendy Lee, Times Staff Writer
Struggling to lure more officers, the Los Angeles Police Department is joining a growing number of law enforcement agencies across the nation in considering less stringent recruitment rules. Police Chief William J. Bratton said he was drawing up the proposed changes, which would end the LAPD's zero-tolerance rule toward past marijuana use and make it easier for the department to hire people with bad credit histories.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | Abby Sewell and Robert Faturechi
The law enforcement leader many expected would replace Sheriff Lee Baca when he steps down next week does not have the required credentials, complicating the job of Los Angeles County supervisors who must pick an interim sheriff. When Baca unexpectedly announced his plans to drop his reelection bid and retire at the end of this month, he recommended that supervisors appoint Assistant Sheriff Terri McDonald to run the department until voters select a permanent sheriff later this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1997 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday abolished a requirement that officers stand at least 5 feet tall to join the LAPD. Department officials requested that the minimum height requirement be eliminated, saying they have found no evidence that shorter people were less capable of performing the duties of a police officer. Furthermore, they said such a requirement exposed the department to potential lawsuits from candidates who were rejected solely because of their height.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
When amateur filmmaker Tom Berninger's rock-star brother Matt, frontman for Brooklyn quintet the National, invited him to be a roadie on his band's biggest tour, Tom had never even been on a tour bus. His lack of experience did not serve him well during his initiation into the business, but a funny thing happened on the way to the concert hall: Tom turned defeat into a documentary that's insightful, sweet and often hilarious. In "Mistaken for Strangers," a fresh revamp of the music-doc template, the National's angsty songs are mere backdrop to a story whose true subjects are sibling love and rivalry and the thorny matter of creative success - here explored through the tension between achievement and striving, or, as one observer puts it, alpha male versus underdog.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1992 | ANNE MICHAUD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Mitzi Ferguson's employer, Archive Corp. in Costa Mesa, bought Cipher Data Products, Ferguson dealt with the lawyers working on the deal. Daily, on the phone, she represents the president to the company's board of directors. She arranges the president's personal and professional schedule and is fluent in several software languages. Ferguson embodies where the secretarial profession is headed--away from tasks such as filing and taking dictation toward information management.
NEWS
August 9, 1996 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
WANTED: Potential elementary school teachers willing to trade the idyllic Pacific Northwest for smoggy, traffic-jammed and crime-ridden Los Angeles. Experience not necessary. Adequate classroom space and supplies not guaranteed. Need for Spanish fluency near-certain. That is not the way the advertisement in the Oregonian read when Cheryl Williams spotted it and decided to respond.
NEWS
February 5, 1996 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Over the past 15 years, Sam Genis has taught Spanish and math to grade schoolers and high schoolers. He's been a principal and athletic director, helped put out a yearbook and advised members of the student council, all at private schools in Montebello and Bellflower.
SPORTS
May 23, 1991 | BOB OATES
The following undrafted football players of recent years--none of whom could meet the scouts' rigid standards for speed, size, strength and/or other measurables at the end of their college careers--became NFL starters shortly before the league adopted its present 80-man summer roster limit, which would have ruled many of them out: OFFENSE Position Player College NFL Team Wide Receiver Stephone Paige Fresno State Kansas City Chiefs Wide Receiver Gary Clark James Madison Washington Redskins
OPINION
December 3, 2013 | By Tamar Jacoby
Instead of going through Congress and making the initiative bipartisan, President Obama acted alone in mid-November, promising $100 million in grants to specialized high schools - such as New York City's Pathways in Technology Early College High School - that prepare students for technical careers. The president's on the right track, but why make it partisan? Schools like P-TECH are an idea whose time has come - one that can be adopted by both parties and by business as well as government.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
The U.S. needs guest workers because Americans won't work on farms -- at least, that's the argument made by many in agriculture as they negotiate over the controversial H-2A program , which allows farmers to bring in predominantly Mexican laborers to pick cotton and trim trees. But labor advocates say there's a group of Americans who have been trying to work on farms, only to be displaced by H-2A workers, who are less likely to complain about poor working conditions because their visas are dependent on their employers.
SPORTS
November 5, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
You don't know Bob Romanski, but if you've watched an NFL game in the last 33 years you've seen his work. That's because any player who has worn the silver and black of the Raiders during that time was outfitted - from shoelaces to shoulder pads, jockstrap to chin strap - by Romanski, the team's equipment manager since the final days of the Carter administration. And that's just the most visible part of his job "It's from A to Z what you do," Romanski says. "There's times where you're working on a helmet radio system for practice and then a couple of hours later you could be tailoring a pair of pants.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Once considered one of the most powerful and sought-after positions in Hollywood, running Walt Disney Studios - the 89-year-old Burbank institution behind "Snow White," "Mary Poppins" and "Pirates of the Caribbean" - now seems about as desirable as playing Goofy on a hot day at Disneyland. But since Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Bob Iger fired his studio head Rich Ross last week, the buzz in Hollywood has been less about who's angling for the studio chairman job and more about who would want it. The reason: Iger's strategy of turning Disney into a collection of brands means that most of the films it releases are not overseen or greenlighted by the movie studio chief, as they are at rival companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2011 | By Paul Pringle and Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
As finance director for the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, Ronald Lederkramer didn't need to do much driving to keep an eye on the stadium's books. But he has charged taxpayers about $7,600 for gasoline since 2008, even for fill-ups near Las Vegas and in Florida and New York. That was enough to drive about 12,000 miles annually in his Infiniti and his Jaguar, which he leased mostly at the public's expense. And on Lederkramer's watch, four other stadium administrators racked up similar bills on the Coliseum's Exxon Mobil account, according to receipts obtained through the California Public Records Act. The managers' jobs required only occasional car trips, typically to nearby destinations such as Staples Center or City Hall, Coliseum officials have said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2009 | Joel Rubin
Who knew the badge, the holster and the iconic dark blue threads worn by Los Angeles police officers could make punching the clock so complicated? A federal judge ruled this week that Los Angeles Police Department officers should be paid for the time it takes them to put on and take off their uniforms and safety equipment, a decision that could cost the city millions of dollars in back pay and higher salaries. In a 39-page ruling, U.S.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
The U.S. needs guest workers because Americans won't work on farms -- at least, that's the argument made by many in agriculture as they negotiate over the controversial H-2A program , which allows farmers to bring in predominantly Mexican laborers to pick cotton and trim trees. But labor advocates say there's a group of Americans who have been trying to work on farms, only to be displaced by H-2A workers, who are less likely to complain about poor working conditions because their visas are dependent on their employers.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1992 | ANNE MICHAUD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Mitzi Ferguson's employer, Archive Corp. of Costa Mesa, bought Cipher Data Products, she dealt with the lawyers on behalf of her office. Daily, on the phone, she represents the company president to its board of directors. She arranges the president's personal and professional schedule and is fluent in several software languages. Ferguson embodies where the secretarial profession is headed--away from production tasks such as filing and taking dictation, and toward information management.
SPORTS
June 5, 2008 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
NEW YORK -- Big Brown, who has had success starting from the outside, will test the inside in Saturday's $1-million Belmont Stakes. Big Brown, attempting to become the first horse to win the Triple Crown in 30 years, got post position No. 1 in Wednesday's draw at Belmont Park and was installed as the 2-5 favorite. Big Brown won the Kentucky Derby from the 20th and outside post and the Florida Derby from the 11th and outside post. So the rail wasn't what trainer Rick Dutrow Jr. wanted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2007 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
A coalition of California schools advocates and parents sued the federal government's Department of Education on Tuesday, claiming it is violating the teacher quality provisions of the No Child Left Behind education law. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in San Francisco, is thought to be the first of its kind in the country and, if successful, could affect more than 10,000 teachers-in-training now working in California classrooms.
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