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Job Satisfaction

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BUSINESS
January 6, 2010 | By Tiffany Hsu
If you're lucky enough to have a job in this economy, chances are that you dislike it. Just 45% of employees are happy in their positions, the lowest level in 22 years, according to a survey released Tuesday by the Conference Board. In 1987, when the New York nonprofit group first began collecting the data, more than 61% said they were satisfied. The recession, and the extra work that many employees who survived layoffs have been saddled with, play a role in the decline -- but not as much as some might think.
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BUSINESS
December 19, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Nearly 70% of workers in North America do not plan to use all of their annual vacation time this year, according to a recent online survey. Right Management, a career and talent management firm, said this is the third consecutive year that the vast majority of workers have said they worked rather than take paid vacation time. Sixty-nine percent of respondents said they won't use all of their vacation time by the end of the year, the firm said. The number was 70% in 2011 and 2012.
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NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Job satisfaction is at a 20-year low in the U.S., and we're spending more and more time at work. Some researchers say there's a cheap and effective way to boost happiness and productivity. Rather than award employees bonuses, either as individuals or in teams, employers who give money to their workers to spend on charities or on their colleagues get better results, the researchers reported this week in the journal PLOS One . The researchers looked at three experiments. In one, workers at an Australian bank were given $25 or $50 to donate to the charity of their choice.
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Job satisfaction is at a 20-year low in the U.S., and we're spending more and more time at work. Some researchers say there's a cheap and effective way to boost happiness and productivity. Rather than award employees bonuses, either as individuals or in teams, employers who give money to their workers to spend on charities or on their colleagues get better results, the researchers reported this week in the journal PLOS One . The researchers looked at three experiments. In one, workers at an Australian bank were given $25 or $50 to donate to the charity of their choice.
NEWS
January 7, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
In the latest entry in the great debate over quantity time vs. quality time, a team of Boston researchers has found that the quality of father-child relationships seems linked to a man's job satisfaction while the amount of time he spends depends on his wife's independence and self-worth. Boston University psychologist Frances K.
NEWS
May 7, 1989 | MALCOLM RITTER, Associated Press
Hate your job? Love your job? Part of the reason may be your genes, a study suggests. By studying identical twins who grew up in different families, researchers found evidence that genes influence a worker's satisfaction with his job. That may be part of the reason some people seem happy no matter what they do, while others have trouble finding a satisfying job, said industrial psychologist Richard Arvey. The findings do not suggest that people who dislike their jobs are genetically doomed to unhappiness at work.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1989 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
Patricia G. Walter was an audiologist, helping rehabilitate the hearing impaired, before she became a vice president and financial consultant at Shearson Lehman Hutton in Chicago. Robert L. Bowker was an accountant in the oil business before he started a fast-food restaurant in Hermosa Beach. Darryl A. McDuel is an engineer at Southern California Gas Co. who is going to law school to pursue a new career as a lawyer.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1990 | WILLIAM NOTTINGHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why do most of the 6.3 million people who hold jobs in the Los Angeles Basin rise near dawn five days a week, pack into polluting automobiles and fight through nerve-wracking commuter traffic to reach what they call work ? Because they enjoy eating three meals a day. Or because they want to feed, clothe, house and educate their families. And also, in the vast majority of cases, because they like what they do, according to Dr. Jerald Jellison, a USC social psychologist.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1988 | MARIA L. La GANGA
Employers take heed: It's love--not money--that workers want. Love of work, also known as job satisfaction, is the No. 1 worker concern today, ranking ahead of job security, money, challenge and promotion, according to a national survey of 100 companies undertaken by the Costa Mesa-based Personnel Journal. "The No. 1 ranking of job satisfaction represents a significant change in worker attitudes in the past six months," said Margaret Magnus, editor and associate publisher of the journal.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Nearly 70% of workers in North America do not plan to use all of their annual vacation time this year, according to a recent online survey. Right Management, a career and talent management firm, said this is the third consecutive year that the vast majority of workers have said they worked rather than take paid vacation time. Sixty-nine percent of respondents said they won't use all of their vacation time by the end of the year, the firm said. The number was 70% in 2011 and 2012.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2010 | By Tiffany Hsu
If you're lucky enough to have a job in this economy, chances are that you dislike it. Just 45% of employees are happy in their positions, the lowest level in 22 years, according to a survey released Tuesday by the Conference Board. In 1987, when the New York nonprofit group first began collecting the data, more than 61% said they were satisfied. The recession, and the extra work that many employees who survived layoffs have been saddled with, play a role in the decline -- but not as much as some might think.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Google Inc. was the top-ranked employer for the second straight year, beating Internet home lender Quicken Loans Inc. and grocery chain Wegmans Food Markets Inc., according to a Fortune magazine poll of employees at 446 companies. The estimated 15,900 employees of the Internet-search company based in Mountain View, Calif., are drawn to the "flexibility, financial security, of course, and the opportunity to get things done," Fortune said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2007 | Howard Blume, Times Staff Writer
As a mid-career professional with a doctorate in chemistry, Maurice Stephenson appeared made to order for the Los Angeles Unified School District, especially because he was eager to teach at a high-poverty campus in a system woefully short of qualified science teachers. But the honeymoon ended abruptly after less than two years. Fed up with student insolence and administrative impotence, he stalked out of Manual Arts High School on March 12 and never went back.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2006 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
"There are now too many musicians in San Francisco, more than enough to fill all the 'jobs.' What we need is work, not musicians. Stay away from San Francisco. You will find it cheaper in the end." Notice signed "By order, Board of Directors, Local #6, San Francisco" and posted in the American Musician in 1898. * ANYONE who supposes that American musicians have a tough time finding jobs compared with their forebears obviously hasn't looked into the matter.
NEWS
September 9, 2001 | SONDRA FARRELL BAZROD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most Americans grow up with the idea that they will have a satisfying career, yet for many the reality is that work is anything but fulfilling. Experts say, however, that anyone, whether they work on a loading dock or in a corner office, can find satisfaction in their job--or at least find another job that is satisfying. The key is not expecting the job to make you happy.
NEWS
September 2, 2001 | WASHINGTON POST
Forget whistling while they work. Most Americans seem to be singing the "Hallelujah Chorus" as they dance through their workdays, according to a review of public attitudes by Karlyn Bowman of the American Enterprise Institute, a Washington think tank. "Poll questions asked over the past quarter century show little change in job satisfaction," Bowman said at a recent AEI panel that included Guy Molyneux of Peter D. Hart Research Associates.
NEWS
September 9, 2001 | SONDRA FARRELL BAZROD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most Americans grow up with the idea that they will have a satisfying career, yet for many the reality is that work is anything but fulfilling. Experts say, however, that anyone, whether they work on a loading dock or in a corner office, can find satisfaction in their job--or at least find another job that is satisfying. The key is not expecting the job to make you happy.
NEWS
September 2, 2001 | WASHINGTON POST
Forget whistling while they work. Most Americans seem to be singing the "Hallelujah Chorus" as they dance through their workdays, according to a review of public attitudes by Karlyn Bowman of the American Enterprise Institute, a Washington think tank. "Poll questions asked over the past quarter century show little change in job satisfaction," Bowman said at a recent AEI panel that included Guy Molyneux of Peter D. Hart Research Associates.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2000 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Dot-com" manager Bill Garnsey earns more than $130,000 annually, plus stock options. San Jose mail clerk Rachel Salinas is a single mother who for years has made about $10 per hour with no benefits. They appear to share little in common. Yet each is essential to the "new economy," and each finds a new job at the rate of one per year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2000
Hats off to Mick Jagger and his Jagged Films producing partner, Victoria Pearman ("Not Unlike a Rolling Stone," by David Gritten, July 30). It sounds like Jagger possesses all the qualities of the old-fashioned creative producer. As the daughter of filmmaker Stanley Kramer, I think it's nice that a hands-on producer is not a dying breed. What surprises me is that the majority of people assume that for a rock star of his status, producing movies "might be a fleeting distraction." Jagger has literally "produced" the Rolling Stones for 30 years and has always been creatively involved, whether it be in the studio or on tour.
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