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April 25, 1996 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ
This is the tale of three towns that got milk but no men's basketball coaches at their colleges. For a few more days, anyhow. It's also a story about their approaches to finding suitable people for the jobs. The process should be fair and equitable, as required by federal and state labor laws, but one of the three schools seems to have forgotten that.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Quick, what rhymes with "start-up?" Celebrity music artists, including rappers, have been finding new ways to invest their money, and Nas, born Nasir Jones, is no exception. After a six-figure investment in the lifestyle publication "Mass Appeal," the rapper has put money into a San Francisco company called Proven , which makes apps to help people apply to online job postings through their smartphones. Nas, who rose to fame with his smash 1994 album "Illmatic," participated in the company's $1-million seed funding round that was led by Andreessen Horowitz and closed this summer.
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NEWS
May 31, 1992 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With corporate recruiting down 30% on college campuses in the most enduring recession to hit Orange County since World War II, this year's graduates at Cal State Fullerton, UC Irvine, Chapman University and other area schools are frantically seeking jobs--many without success. Brian Collins, a business major at Cal State Fullerton, finished his classes in January and began an intensive job search in his marketing specialty in March.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The job market for this year's college graduates appears to be on the upswing as economic forecasts show seniors will have a better shot at employment than in past years and more businesses are recruiting at campus job fairs this spring. Those positive signs were present at Cal State Long Beach recently when an event attracted more than 90 potential employers, about 50% more than last year. About 5,000 students, many of whom had swapped their T-shirts and sandals for a more formal look, handed out resumes and hoped to replace anxiety about their post-graduation employment prospects with the growing optimism that recent national reports project.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Putting on his "moon suit" during a make-believe chemical disaster was only part of the fun for Gary Remson when he took an eight-week course on handling hazardous materials last year at West Los Angeles College. The teaching seemed first-rate. Experts from the Police and Fire departments sat in as guest speakers. But most important of all, the laid-off aerospace worker looked forward to his prize "at the end of the rainbow"--a job with a future.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1991 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's the old rich-get-richer story: If you need a job, you can't get one. But if you already have one, you get offers of more. Most executive search firms are besieged by out-of-work executives, said Paul Hawkinson, who publishes the Fordyce Letter, a newsletter for the executive recruiting industry. "But generally search firms aren't interested in those people. Those are the people who answer ads. Their resumes go everywhere on their own."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2009 | DAVID SARNO
If you think of Google as the Internet's memory -- the process that can access every image, sound and bit of knowledge that a decade of our online existence has generated and stored -- then Twitter is its stream of consciousness. "Stream" has actually become the standard term for the motley sequence of messages that arrives to you, the Twitter user, from all the people you've chosen to "follow": friends, celebrities, industry luminaries, academics, businesses and so on. Like a stream of consciousness, the "twitstream" contains many kinds of thoughts (as well as a lot of useless half-thoughts)
NEWS
June 12, 1992 | PATRICK MOTT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
So, did you find anything promising in the classifieds? If you're like the 5.7% of Orange County residents who are unemployed, that's what you probably turned to first. The Angels, Dear Abby and Calvin and Hobbes can wait. You need a job. But the world of gainful employment--and job searching--isn't what it used to be. The want ads and the headhunters are still there, but what happens if you've been laid off and you're out there looking for a job for the first time in 20 years?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1994 | JEFF SCHNAUFER
Dennis Burgess never thought he would end up here, at a job re-entry program run by the American Assn. of Retired Persons. After all, he is only 44. But after he left his job as a program executive in charge of 39 television shows at ABC-TV in 1990 to pursue a writing career, the Reseda resident spent four years learning how hard it was to sell scripts from the other side of the table.
NEWS
May 13, 1992 | DON OLDENBURG, THE WASHINGTON POST
After three years as an executive assistant with a Washington-based marketing firm, she decided it was time to move ahead. She figured she'd paid her dues. Her boss raved about her abilities, even said she was management material. Now, at 24, she wanted to be an account executive, maybe move to another company and make more money. Despite the tight job market, contacts and a shining resume landed her an interview quickly. "Looks like you're qualified.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2011 | By Andrew Leckey
Question: I thought the sky was the limit for my shares of Monster Worldwide Inc., but apparently I was wrong. What are the prospects now? Answer: Despite robust international growth and the powerful role of the Internet in job placement, the stock of this Internet job-search pioneer is pressured by the uncertain economy. The strong employment network the company has assembled faces obstacles such as high unemployment and a growing number of online competitors. Shares of Monster Worldwide are down about 70% from their 52-week high.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2011 | By Christi Parsons and Lisa Mascaro, Los Angeles Times
President Obama used his executive authority to announce a few small steps to help military veterans find jobs, part of a campaign to show that he is fighting unemployment while Congress remains in political gridlock over how to boost hiring. Standing in the White House Rose Garden with veterans at his side Monday, Obama also called on lawmakers to pass tax credits for businesses that hire veterans — part of his $447-billion jobs bill that has largely been stalled on Capitol Hill for nearly two months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2011 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
In a bizarre game of musical chairs, nearly 1,000 Los Angeles teachers — who are guaranteed jobs somewhere in the school system — have been hunting for a school that wants them. And hundreds of them have to counter a stigma that they are undesirable castoffs, because they previously worked at low-performing schools that are being restructured. These teachers are from eight schools that are undergoing shakeups intended to bring in new talent, shed previous instructors and administrators and fundamentally change the academic culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2009 | DAVID SARNO
If you think of Google as the Internet's memory -- the process that can access every image, sound and bit of knowledge that a decade of our online existence has generated and stored -- then Twitter is its stream of consciousness. "Stream" has actually become the standard term for the motley sequence of messages that arrives to you, the Twitter user, from all the people you've chosen to "follow": friends, celebrities, industry luminaries, academics, businesses and so on. Like a stream of consciousness, the "twitstream" contains many kinds of thoughts (as well as a lot of useless half-thoughts)
NATIONAL
December 20, 2008 | Greg Miller
President-elect Barack Obama has selected retired Navy Adm. Dennis C. Blair to serve as the nation's next intelligence director but has not concluded his search for someone to lead the CIA, according to government officials familiar with the selection process. If confirmed, Blair would be Obama's point person on an array of highly charged intelligence issues the incoming administration will inherit from President Bush.
SPORTS
December 14, 2008 | Kevin Baxter, Baxter is a Times staff writer.
Michael Westbrook, a fresh-faced 22-year-old with dreams as big as his native Texas, is standing in a chilly corridor at the Las Vegas Hilton, his future, as well as an empty ballroom, spilling out before him. He has spent nearly a quarter of his life in radio -- long enough to know he doesn't want to spend the rest of it doing traffic and weather. "I'm trying to get a minor league play-by-play job," Westbrook says earnestly. He has come to the right place -- the center of the baseball universe.
SPORTS
December 14, 2008 | Kevin Baxter, Baxter is a Times staff writer.
Michael Westbrook, a fresh-faced 22-year-old with dreams as big as his native Texas, is standing in a chilly corridor at the Las Vegas Hilton, his future, as well as an empty ballroom, spilling out before him. He has spent nearly a quarter of his life in radio -- long enough to know he doesn't want to spend the rest of it doing traffic and weather. "I'm trying to get a minor league play-by-play job," Westbrook says earnestly. He has come to the right place -- the center of the baseball universe.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1999 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Every April it's the same: Tax manager John Juricek ends up a casualty of the income tax season. The 100-plus-hour workweeks, ratcheting stress, demanding clients and more than 300 tax returns he prepares take their toll on the 39-year-old West Hollywood resident. "My back goes out, my ulcer gets worse, and I'm a nervous wreck. I'm not a pretty sight," he says. Juricek, a former Fulbright scholar who holds a master's degree in international affairs, hadn't intended to specialize in taxation.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2008 | From the Associated Press
It's been a grim year for layoffs and job cuts with nine straight months of job losses, worsening in September when U.S. employers handed out the most pink slips of any month since 2003. All told, 760,000 people have lost their jobs this year. The picture probably won't grow brighter any time soon. The job outlook for the near future is dismal, according to John Challenger, chief executive of the job outplacement consulting firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas Inc.
WORLD
June 14, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The Pentagon said Wednesday that it has created a website to help veterans who face difficulty returning to jobs or finding new ones after deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan. Michael Dominguez, principal deputy undersecretary of Defense, said the program, dubbed TurboTAP, seeks to improve on the Transition Assistance Program by letting National Guard and Reserve members get job data, build a resume online and do a job search, all in one place.
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