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BUSINESS
December 2, 2001
"Firms Cut 21,000 Jobs in State" [Nov. 10] left me curious as to interviewee Deyanira Garcia's statements in describing her quandary. She is quoted as saying she needs at least $14 an hour, the rate of pay she received at her last job, to make ends meet. She now struggles along on $844 monthly unemployment benefits. She goes on to say that she would be unable to make it on what appears to be a rejected job offer paying her $10 an hour and continues drawing unemployment benefits while searching for that elusive $14-plus-an-hour job. With four small children to care for, she faces a daunting challenge to be sure.
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NEWS
October 27, 2001 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They don't pay particularly well and the work they offer ranges from the dull to the dangerous. But since Sept. 11, the nation's intelligence agencies have seen a wave of applications more earnest and enormous than recruiters once dared to imagine. The CIA has fielded 20,000 applications since the terrorist attacks and up to 600 more resumes arrive each day, five times the pre-attack volume.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2001 | LISA GIRION, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the economy shedding more jobs than it added in recent months and unemployment rolls at a nine-year high, American workers have plenty to worry about this Labor Day. The people waiting in employment offices to search job data banks and talk to career counselors are signs of the increasing pain caused by the economic slowdown. Mounting corporate cutbacks helped to boost the number of Americans on unemployment to 3.
NEWS
August 26, 2001 | RACHEL BECK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It wasn't long ago that corporate America couldn't stop fawning over dot-commers. They didn't need resumes or interviewing skills. Recruiters chased anyone with the least bit of Internet experience. But now that the fairy-tale job market has collapsed, many of these start-up refugees are learning what it takes to find work the "old-economy" way. They are studying up on business etiquette, what to wear on an interview and how to describe their skills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2001
Re "Residents Dismayed by Wachs' Absences," July 21: Los Angeles fired Councilman Joel Wachs. The vehicle used to accomplish that was fairly impersonal. It's called term limits. The city also fired his staff on the same basis. Term limits do give the employees a long advance notice period--the entire last term of office. I don't live in Wachs' district, but I do find it notable that his constituents have reelected him for multiple terms. However, term limits are not the point. The real question is: How do you expect the terminated employees to behave while waiting for their last paychecks?
SPORTS
June 21, 2001 | Jason Reid
The Dodgers moved Wednesday to end speculation about Dan Evans, saying the interim assistant general manager will not pursue other jobs during the season. Evans, in his first month with the Dodgers, is reportedly a leading candidate to become the Pittsburgh Pirate general manager and has been mentioned in connection with many possible openings.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2001 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles County coalition of business, educators and government agencies launched a Web site portal Friday to better link job seekers--including welfare recipients--with training, education, social service and employment opportunities.
NEWS
March 19, 2001 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Except for a love of magic, they have little in common--the brassy young man in leather pants from Los Angeles who likes to float cigarettes, and the polite kid in jeans from rural Missouri who cuts his wife--and the table she's on--in half. Each has come to town on the same pilgrimage: to land a showroom on the Strip, sharing the city's bright lights with its resident lords of magic, Siegfried and Roy.
NEWS
January 7, 2001 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Editor's note: There have been some real success stories among people who have had Career Make-Overs. Here we check in with a few of them. * Back in July, Peg Heglund, 68, desperately yearned to return to the work force. She found her leisure-filled life as a retiree monotonous. Problem was, the Seal Beach resident wasn't sure what type of work she wanted to do.
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