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NEWS
March 18, 2001 | RONALD D. WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The highly competitive online job-search market that began in earnest about six years ago is showing no signs of slowing down. In fact, the sputtering economy, the rapid succession of dot-com companies becoming "dot-gones" and large-scale layoffs have made this relatively young venue even more popular and important. Worried employees and laid-off workers crave the breadth, immediacy and low cost of online searches.
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NEWS
March 18, 2001 | RONALD D. WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Recruiters can troll through the endless array of resumes by doing straightforward Internet searches. But increasingly something more is required. A consensus is building that it can be much more fruitful to search for so-called passive candidates even though they are much more difficult to locate. Passive candidates are proven performers who aren't actually looking for jobs, but would be willing to consider the right offer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2001 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS
Just as technology has changed the way retailers sell everything from groceries to cars, the digital wave has altered how fresh-faced college grads, anxious to land that first big job, must sell themselves. The transformation goes far beyond the ability to search thousands of Internet job boards. It extends to things as basic as how you portray yourself to potential employers in a digital world.
NEWS
January 7, 2001 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Editor's note: There have been some real success stories among people who have had Career Make-Overs. Here we check in with a few of them. * Back in July, Peg Heglund, 68, desperately yearned to return to the work force. She found her leisure-filled life as a retiree monotonous. Problem was, the Seal Beach resident wasn't sure what type of work she wanted to do.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2000 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Dot-com" manager Bill Garnsey earns more than $130,000 annually, plus stock options. San Jose mail clerk Rachel Salinas is a single mother who for years has made about $10 per hour with no benefits. They appear to share little in common. Yet each is essential to the "new economy," and each finds a new job at the rate of one per year.
NEWS
October 30, 2000 | JILL LEOVY and NEDRA RHONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the commercial actors strike draws to a close, thousands of actors are preparing not to go back to work, as most workers would after a strike, but to go back to seeking work: auditioning, scanning ads, waiting by the phone.
NEWS
October 22, 2000 | LISA GIRION
Even in this tight employment market, job applicants can blow it in the interview. To help college graduates prepare for career-launching interviews, Jobtrak.com, an employment exchange, recently compiled a list of the top 15 questions from the country's leading employers: 1. Tell me about yourself. 2. What do you know about our company? 3. Why do you want to work for us? 4. What unique qualities or abilities would you bring to this job? 5. What are your major strengths and weaknesses? 6.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2000 | LISA GIRION, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Mark Winkler decided last month that he wanted a new job, he made a couple of telephone calls. Within 48 hours, the 41-year-old executive had more than 700 e-mails from headhunters representing everything from "dot-com" start-ups to Fortune 100 corporations. Some asked for a resume. Others invited him to interview, and one offered a job--sight unseen. Within two weeks, 15 job offers had been express-mailed to Winkler's home.
NEWS
September 24, 2000 | ANNA MUOIO, FAST COMPANY
It's hard to argue with the idea that the company with the best talent wins--or that the best place to find talent is on the Internet. The challenge comes when you actually try to use the Web as a recruiting pipeline. With more than 1 billion Web pages and 10,000 career sites, finding the perfect hire online might be harder than finding a wedding ring in a sand dune. Worse, most great people already have great jobs.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2000 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the nation's tightest labor markets, Pamala Martinez quit her job 2 1/2 months ago to make the leap from retail to office work. She's still dangling in thin air. "Somebody told me it was a good time to be out of work," the 46-year-old Anaheim resident said. "I've been [job hunting] two months. Obviously I'm not doing something right."
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