Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJob Searching
IN THE NEWS

Job Searching

NEWS
October 30, 2000 | JILL LEOVY and NEDRA RHONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the commercial actors strike draws to a close, thousands of actors are preparing not to go back to work, as most workers would after a strike, but to go back to seeking work: auditioning, scanning ads, waiting by the phone.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 22, 2000 | LISA GIRION
Even in this tight employment market, job applicants can blow it in the interview. To help college graduates prepare for career-launching interviews, Jobtrak.com, an employment exchange, recently compiled a list of the top 15 questions from the country's leading employers: 1. Tell me about yourself. 2. What do you know about our company? 3. Why do you want to work for us? 4. What unique qualities or abilities would you bring to this job? 5. What are your major strengths and weaknesses? 6.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2000 | LISA GIRION, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Mark Winkler decided last month that he wanted a new job, he made a couple of telephone calls. Within 48 hours, the 41-year-old executive had more than 700 e-mails from headhunters representing everything from "dot-com" start-ups to Fortune 100 corporations. Some asked for a resume. Others invited him to interview, and one offered a job--sight unseen. Within two weeks, 15 job offers had been express-mailed to Winkler's home.
NEWS
September 24, 2000 | ANNA MUOIO, FAST COMPANY
It's hard to argue with the idea that the company with the best talent wins--or that the best place to find talent is on the Internet. The challenge comes when you actually try to use the Web as a recruiting pipeline. With more than 1 billion Web pages and 10,000 career sites, finding the perfect hire online might be harder than finding a wedding ring in a sand dune. Worse, most great people already have great jobs.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2000 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the nation's tightest labor markets, Pamala Martinez quit her job 2 1/2 months ago to make the leap from retail to office work. She's still dangling in thin air. "Somebody told me it was a good time to be out of work," the 46-year-old Anaheim resident said. "I've been [job hunting] two months. Obviously I'm not doing something right."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2000 | Karen Robinson-Jacobs
In the latest marriage made in cyber heaven, many traditional employment recruiting services are finding that Internet jobs boards can be more friend than foe, as both seek to cash in on the tight job market. So far, jobs boards like Monster.com and Careerpath.com have raked in substantial amounts of revenue from employment agency job postings--for both temporary and permanent placements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2000 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California is desperate for public school teachers, but in the community college system, the problem is the reverse: Underemployment of teachers is rampant, and more than 100 job seekers may line up for a single opening. It's nothing new in the world of academia, where many young PhDs and M.A.s fresh out of graduate school have faced daunting competition for university faculty jobs for many years now.
NEWS
June 29, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With former County Executive Officer Jan Mittermeier gone, the county must now go through a selection process for the top government job with supervisors poised to direct a nationwide talent search for her replacement. But in similar searches in the past, supervisors inevitably have looked far but picked locally, selecting someone already in the county fold.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2000 | GREG HERNANDEZ
Armed with millions of dollars in federal funds from the Workplace Investment Act, Orange County and the cities of Anaheim and Santa Ana have set up boards to assist people in either finding employment or upgrading their skills to get better jobs. The boards will also work with businesses to determine what skills they need.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2000 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When graphic designer Kevin Young recently sought a new job, he launched a mail campaign that might have impressed the folks at Publishers Clearing House. He sent out hundreds of resumes, faxed three different responses for each want ad that caught his eye and sent out "follow-up packages" showcasing his work, he says. Those efforts landed the 33-year-old Los Angeles resident more than 40 interviews. But what they didn't generate were employment offers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|