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Job Searching

NEWS
November 16, 2001 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miguel Mata is jobless for the second time in a year. When the 33-year-old father of three lost his job as banquet server at a hotel near LAX, he suddenly couldn't pay the $575 rent or buy food. He lost his health insurance and managed to survive with the help of food stamps, union aid and the generosity of friends.
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NEWS
October 27, 2001 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They don't pay particularly well and the work they offer ranges from the dull to the dangerous. But since Sept. 11, the nation's intelligence agencies have seen a wave of applications more earnest and enormous than recruiters once dared to imagine. The CIA has fielded 20,000 applications since the terrorist attacks and up to 600 more resumes arrive each day, five times the pre-attack volume.
NEWS
September 9, 2001 | RONALD D. WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There may be a reason one of your colleagues is dressed to the nines on a casual day and another almost sprints to her phone when she thinks it is ringing. More than half your co-workers are probably in the job market in one way or another, according to a new survey by Towers Perrin, a New York-based management and human resources consulting firm with 9,000 employees worldwide.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2001 | LISA GIRION, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the economy shedding more jobs than it added in recent months and unemployment rolls at a nine-year high, American workers have plenty to worry about this Labor Day. The people waiting in employment offices to search job data banks and talk to career counselors are signs of the increasing pain caused by the economic slowdown. Mounting corporate cutbacks helped to boost the number of Americans on unemployment to 3.
NEWS
August 26, 2001 | RACHEL BECK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It wasn't long ago that corporate America couldn't stop fawning over dot-commers. They didn't need resumes or interviewing skills. Recruiters chased anyone with the least bit of Internet experience. But now that the fairy-tale job market has collapsed, many of these start-up refugees are learning what it takes to find work the "old-economy" way. They are studying up on business etiquette, what to wear on an interview and how to describe their skills.
NEWS
August 12, 2001 | RONALD D. WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wisdom might dictate that this is not the time to consider leaving a decent job. The economy is too volatile, the stock market too frightening and the steady toll of layoffs is increasing the number of people who are out there hunting. But a thoroughly considered job switch is not as risky as it might seem, according to experts.
NEWS
July 29, 2001 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Competition for jobs is getting tougher, but it's most intense for those with problematic work and personal histories. Terminations, inexperience, extended absences from the work force and criminal records are just a few red flags for potential employers. But if dealt with intelligently, a less-than-stellar resume can be overcome. Fortunately, employers have become more tolerant of less-than-perfect employment histories, said Robert Lund, chief executive of Ejobs Inc. in Dallas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2001
Re "Residents Dismayed by Wachs' Absences," July 21: Los Angeles fired Councilman Joel Wachs. The vehicle used to accomplish that was fairly impersonal. It's called term limits. The city also fired his staff on the same basis. Term limits do give the employees a long advance notice period--the entire last term of office. I don't live in Wachs' district, but I do find it notable that his constituents have reelected him for multiple terms. However, term limits are not the point. The real question is: How do you expect the terminated employees to behave while waiting for their last paychecks?
SPORTS
June 21, 2001 | Jason Reid
The Dodgers moved Wednesday to end speculation about Dan Evans, saying the interim assistant general manager will not pursue other jobs during the season. Evans, in his first month with the Dodgers, is reportedly a leading candidate to become the Pittsburgh Pirate general manager and has been mentioned in connection with many possible openings.
NEWS
May 20, 2001 | RONALD D. WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jennifer Pham had been warned that she would have to undergo a behavioral interview if she wanted to get a job with Accenture, the giant management and technology consulting firm. Still, the 26-year-old MBA candidate found the 45-minute session much more demanding than she anticipated. "It's pretty intense," said Pham, who is due to graduate from the University of Cincinnati next month. "You can pretty much fake one or two answers, but the third time they come back to it you pretty much can't.
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