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Job Sharing

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BUSINESS
April 16, 1995 | NANETTE FONDAS, NANETTE FONDAS is an assistant professor at UC Riverside's A. Gary Anderson Graduate School of Management
Sharing top executive jobs is an idea whose time has come. Top jobs in both the private and public sectors have become so large and demanding that one practical solution is for two people to split the chief executive post. Why does the idea of sharing the top spot deserve consideration? One reason is that it is becoming more common. Recall that when Louis V. Gerstner left RJR Nabisco, the company elevated two vice presidents to co-chief executive to take his place.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2013 | Steve Lopez
Last week, I visited a South Los Angeles woman whose story should embarrass us. It's a story that's not uncommon, and deserves the full attention of the next mayor of the city. Alicia, whose full name I'm withholding because she's afraid her boss would fire her, is a maid who started working for a major hotel chain in Hollywood about three years ago. Her hourly pay is $8.65, and her last raise was 5 cents an hour. I kid you not. They threw her an extra nickel. Toward the end of the mayoral campaign, local labor leaders tried to win support for candidate Wendy Greuel by suggesting that she would raise the minimum wage in Los Angeles to $15 an hour.
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NEWS
July 10, 2001 | SANDY BANKS
On Mondays, it was Mrs. McGray at the head of the class, ushering in the second-graders. And when Fridays rolled around, it was Mrs. Sears who sent them home, backpacks full of spelling lists and arithmetic papers. That has been the drill for years at Tarzana's Nestle Avenue Elementary, where Deanna McGray and Joni Sears--with 46 years of experience between them--shared one job in a second-grade class. It was McGray's class on Mondays and Tuesdays; Sears' on Thursdays and Fridays.
TRAVEL
December 25, 2010 | By Jen Leo
Hate your job? Bolster your courage to take that epic trip with Careerbreaksecrets.com . What's hot: Travelers who have left their jobs to travel share their stories, from struggles to triumphs. The site aims to offer advice and inspiration through videos and blog posts. Click on the "inspiration" tab to find "real career break stories. " Check out the "market" section, which points to other online travel resources. The site was founded by American Jeff Jung, who says he quit his job in marketing in 2006 to embark on his own career break.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1995 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anne Pearl and Bill Rosenfeld share the same desk. The same appointment book. The same phone number. The same files. The same stapler. Even the same computer disks. In fact, the two social workers have become so interchangeable at a hospital cancer ward in San Francisco that memos from their colleagues arrive addressed to "Blanne." At Hewlett-Packard, Karen Boda and Rebecca Hinkle, who have split the duties of a management job for two years, have also built such a symbiotic work relationship.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1999 | SHERWOOD ROSS, REUTERS
"We are two dynamic professionals at BankBoston with 35 years of combined experience in the areas of team management, customer service, sales, operations and financial management," their unblushing letter to the bank's top executives began. The Sept. 26, 1997, letter explained that the two experienced branch managers sought "a combined position" that could enable them to "add significant value to the corporation" and added politely, "We are currently exploring various options within the bank."
BUSINESS
February 6, 1995 | MARLA CONE
Four years ago, Bill Rosenfeld recognized the classic signs of burnout in himself. Bouts of depression. Sagging energy. Distraction. Rosenfeld, who had already changed professions twice, wanted desperately to save his seven-year career as a counselor to cancer patients, but he knew he could no longer work long, unfettered hours in such an emotionally and physically draining field. He decided to pursue a novel idea: job sharing.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1995
Two and a half years ago, job sharing was such a novel concept in the corporate world that Rebecca Hinkle and Karen Boda were reluctant to even broach the idea with their supervisor at Hewlett-Packard. Now they function so perfectly as a team that they share one job from 800 miles apart. As dual managers of a team of 13 engineers who answer customers' questions about products, Boda, who works in Atlanta, and Hinkle, based in Kansas City, Mo.
NEWS
February 7, 1986 | GARY LIBMAN
His back hurt from bending over to wash dishes and change diapers. The telephone solicitor didn't understand when he said he was the woman of the house. He had to remind the teacher at the parent-child observation class, who kept telling the children to take their mother's hand, that a father was present. He explained regularly when he took his sons to the bank that he wasn't baby-sitting for a day--that he was rearing them for a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1991 | TERRY SPENCER
Two longtime city employees will share the position of community services superintendent, city Recreation Director Susan Hunt has announced. Kay Miller, a 15-year city employee, will oversee the department's cultural and fine arts programs, including the Fullerton Museum Center and the Muckenthaler Cultural Center. Jan Hobson, an 18-year employee, will head the recreation and human services programs.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Kmart Holding Corp., the third-largest U.S. discount retailer, posted its second consecutive quarterly profit Monday after closing stores and cutting jobs during bankruptcy protection. Shares of Kmart rose 9.8%. Fiscal first-quarter net income was $93 million, or 94 cents a share, the Troy, Mich.-based retailer said. Kmart had a loss of $862 million, or $1.65, a year earlier as the company reorganized its finances. Sales dropped 25% to $4.62 billion in the quarter ended April 28.
NEWS
July 13, 2001
The concept of teacher job sharing is one of the best ideas that has developed in the school system (Sandy Banks' column, "End of Job Sharing Risks Pushing Away Good Teachers," July 10). This innovative program should be encouraged, not discarded. Job sharing allows for good teachers who may not be able to work full time to teach. When two teachers are responsible for the same class, they are more organized, they share information and prepare better lessons for children. Job sharing reduces teacher burnout and complacency, which also helps kids.
NEWS
July 10, 2001 | SANDY BANKS
On Mondays, it was Mrs. McGray at the head of the class, ushering in the second-graders. And when Fridays rolled around, it was Mrs. Sears who sent them home, backpacks full of spelling lists and arithmetic papers. That has been the drill for years at Tarzana's Nestle Avenue Elementary, where Deanna McGray and Joni Sears--with 46 years of experience between them--shared one job in a second-grade class. It was McGray's class on Mondays and Tuesdays; Sears' on Thursdays and Fridays.
NEWS
December 25, 2000 | MANUEL ROIG-FRANZIA, WASHINGTON POST
The cargo hold of the big jet bound for Central America gapes outside the terminal at Dulles International Airport in northern Virginia as the massive packages and mounds of luggage pile up in front of the ticket counter inside. To airport baggage handlers, the boxes and bags bound for Central America can be measured in tons. To many of the passengers who struggle under their burden, the baggage is something of a different measure.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1999 | SHERWOOD ROSS, REUTERS
"We are two dynamic professionals at BankBoston with 35 years of combined experience in the areas of team management, customer service, sales, operations and financial management," their unblushing letter to the bank's top executives began. The Sept. 26, 1997, letter explained that the two experienced branch managers sought "a combined position" that could enable them to "add significant value to the corporation" and added politely, "We are currently exploring various options within the bank."
SPORTS
March 20, 1996 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aldo Zuniga didn't expect to have a senior season that ended with him being named The Times Orange County boys' soccer player of the year. He was just happy to become Orange's starting goalkeeper after sharing the position for two years. "I just love to play soccer," Zuniga said. "That's all I wanted to do is just play. Getting all of this is just extra. I never expected anything, but it's a great way to go out."
NEWS
February 19, 1989
Re Paul Rosenfield's Feb. 12 article about Disney's Jeffrey Katzenberg and Bette Midler: A powerful, creative studio executive working with a talented, versatile actress? What a concept! Maybe the whole industry will take notice and start working together rather than trying to make the best short-term deal. STEVEN E. BROWNE Glendale
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1990 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
A new job-share program that began in Costa Mesa last month means that city planner Kim Brandt can now spend more time with her 6-year-old and 7-month-old sons. Under the same program, her colleague Kristen Caspers can return to school. Caspers and Brandt, two Costa Mesa employees, are the test subjects in a program developed to help workers scale down their hours for personal reasons while keeping their jobs and benefits.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1995 | NANETTE FONDAS, NANETTE FONDAS is an assistant professor at UC Riverside's A. Gary Anderson Graduate School of Management
Sharing top executive jobs is an idea whose time has come. Top jobs in both the private and public sectors have become so large and demanding that one practical solution is for two people to split the chief executive post. Why does the idea of sharing the top spot deserve consideration? One reason is that it is becoming more common. Recall that when Louis V. Gerstner left RJR Nabisco, the company elevated two vice presidents to co-chief executive to take his place.
NEWS
February 14, 1995 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a factory in this small town a few miles east of Antwerp, Annemie Raeymaekers once assembled light fixtures five days a week. Then she opted for four. Under a program offered by her employer, every Thursday since October has become an extra day off for Raeymaekers--a day for quality time with her two young children, for getting ahead on the housework and for handling chores that once made the weekends a rat race. She earns less but says it is worth it.
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