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NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WAUKESHA, Wis. - President Obama on Thursday ordered an across-the-board review of federal job training programs, seeking to make the American workforce more job-ready, but he acknowledged that his presidential initiative just scratches the surface. Speaking to a crowd at a General Electric gas engines facility, Obama said the nation needs a more sweeping jobs plan that would have to be approved by Congress. “I want to work with them, but I can't wait for them,” he said. “We've got too much work to do out there.” The push to improve job readiness comes on the second day of the president's post-State of the Union tour to sell his agenda for the year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
March 4, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Looking beyond the deficit battles and financial crises of years past, President Obama put forward a $3.9-trillion budget proposal Tuesday that set out a wish list of programs on education, infrastructure, job training and urban revitalization, adding policy details to his rhetorical promises to bridge the gap between rich and poor. Like any president's annual budget blueprint, Obama's stands no chance of being adopted as is by Congress. This year, the prospects are especially dim since Congress recently approved a two-year spending deal after years of ugly budget fights, and there is little interest in reopening the debate.
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OPINION
August 29, 1999
Re "Welfare Recipients Call for Job Training," Aug. 21: Welfare reform is supposed to help the poor get jobs and become financially stable. Nevertheless, CalWORKS, which pushes welfare recipients to get jobs, no matter what the job, has proven to be flawed because people who get off of welfare receive only part-time, low-paying jobs, plunging them into another form of poverty. Obviously then, we need to improve the training that these people receive. In addition to better equipping the poor, we also need to increase the minimum wage so that welfare recipients who return to low-paying jobs have enough beyond basic necessities.
NEWS
March 4, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON -- President Obama unveiled a budget proposal Tuesday that increases spending on early childhood education, job training, high-tech manufacturing and urban redevelopment in an effort to shrink the gap between rich and poor. “Our budget is about choices. It's about our values,” Obama said Tuesday as he promoted his spending plan at a local elementary school. “We've got to decide if we're going to keep squeezing the middle class or reduce our deficits responsibly.” The annual budget plan includes an additional $56 billion for what the White House dubs the “Opportunity, Growth the Security Initiative.” The list is a grab bag of Democratic priorities currently stalled in a divided Congress.
NATIONAL
January 30, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WAUKESHA, Wis. - President Obama sat down at his portable signing table at a gas engine plant here Thursday to order an across-the-board review of how to improve federal job training programs. A day after he highlighted some significant changes he can make on his own, such as creating a new government-guaranteed retirement savings account, his jobs proposal was decidedly smaller bore. Obama acknowledged as much as he spoke to a crowd of General Electric employees, saying that an effective plan to create jobs would require investments in infrastructure and changes in the tax code, which he can't do without Congress.
NEWS
March 4, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON -- President Obama unveiled a budget proposal Tuesday that increases spending on early childhood education, job training, high-tech manufacturing and urban redevelopment in an effort to shrink the gap between rich and poor. “Our budget is about choices. It's about our values,” Obama said Tuesday as he promoted his spending plan at a local elementary school. “We've got to decide if we're going to keep squeezing the middle class or reduce our deficits responsibly.” The annual budget plan includes an additional $56 billion for what the White House dubs the “Opportunity, Growth the Security Initiative.” The list is a grab bag of Democratic priorities currently stalled in a divided Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1995 | PAUL ELIAS
Eighty-nine Ventura County residents between the ages of 22 and 30 will receive 10 weeks of vocational training thanks to an allocation of $5 million distributed by the federal departments of Labor and Commerce in Southern California. The program, called Joblinks, will fund a training program in the building trades. It will be administered in Ventura County by the Job Training Policy and the Building and Construction Trades councils.
NEWS
May 8, 2003 | Mark Miller, Special to The Times
The life of the single person in Los Angeles isn't all nerve-wracking pain, disappointment and heartache. OK, that's a lie. But there are a couple of positive things to be said about being single. For example, the world is filled with fascinating occupations, and I've gained invaluable experience in most of them, thanks to dating. My resume is now 34 pages long. And that's just for the last two years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2010 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Hundreds of low-income and unemployed residents in Los Angeles County are receiving job training and placement at local hospitals, clinics and pharmacies in an ambitious effort that taps into the growing need for healthcare workers. The Youth Policy Institute, a local nonprofit managing the program, opened its doors to applicants in March and has already enrolled about 400 trainees. There is room for 1,200 participants total. "The demand is so great for this," said Dixon Slingerland, executive director of the institute.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - Chief executives from 21 companies gathered at the White House on Friday, bringing with them a pledge not to unfairly weed out the long-term unemployed in their hiring process. About 300 businesses - including Apple Inc., EBay Inc., Gap Inc., Pacific Gas & Electric Corp., 21st Century Fox Inc., Walt Disney Co. and Magic Johnson Enterprises - signed the document, which promises not to discriminate against job applicants solely because they have been out of work for extended stretches.
NATIONAL
January 30, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WAUKESHA, Wis. - President Obama sat down at his portable signing table at a gas engine plant here Thursday to order an across-the-board review of how to improve federal job training programs. A day after he highlighted some significant changes he can make on his own, such as creating a new government-guaranteed retirement savings account, his jobs proposal was decidedly smaller bore. Obama acknowledged as much as he spoke to a crowd of General Electric employees, saying that an effective plan to create jobs would require investments in infrastructure and changes in the tax code, which he can't do without Congress.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WAUKESHA, Wis. - President Obama on Thursday ordered an across-the-board review of federal job training programs, seeking to make the American workforce more job-ready, but he acknowledged that his presidential initiative just scratches the surface. Speaking to a crowd at a General Electric gas engines facility, Obama said the nation needs a more sweeping jobs plan that would have to be approved by Congress. “I want to work with them, but I can't wait for them,” he said. “We've got too much work to do out there.” The push to improve job readiness comes on the second day of the president's post-State of the Union tour to sell his agenda for the year.
SPORTS
January 25, 2014 | By Ben Bolch
Adam Silver won't have to familiarize himself with the minutiae of the NBA's collective bargaining agreement upon succeeding David Stern as league commissioner Saturday. Silver negotiated that deal himself. It was the most high-profile assignment Silver undertook during a 22-year apprenticeship that widely is believed to have prepared him for the league's top job. The longtime lawyer started as a special assistant to Stern before running the entertainment division and becoming deputy commissioner in 2006.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Lawmakers took to the airwaves Sunday to argue about extending long-term unemployment benefits for 1.3 million Americans who were cut off last month, a politically sensitive issue in an election year. Democrats urged their Republican counterparts to join in granting emergency unemployment benefits. Republicans countered that they want to explore other options, including new job training initiatives. Both sides intend to highlight the dispute during this year's midterm election campaigns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
With the federal government shutdown official Tuesday, local officials said it was "business as usual," even as hundreds of L.A. County workers demanding higher wages walked off the job. "Right now, there's no impact. It's business as usual for us," Ryan Alsop, an assistant chief executive for the county, said of the federal shutdown. "The problem is when these shutdowns go longer than a few weeks, at most. " Alsop said that during past federal shutdowns, "the county has never seen an immediate operational or fiscal impact in terms of our programs.
OPINION
September 16, 2013 | By Lois Davis
If California is serious about reducing its prison population, one crucial component will have to be reducing recidivism. Currently, a lot of the state's inmates are men and women who've been in prison more than once. They get out, they have little training or education, they can't get jobs and, in many cases, they return to lives of crime and find themselves back behind bars. But a major new study of correctional education in U.S. state prisons suggests there are things California could do to slow that revolving door.
SPORTS
July 1, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
DENVER - Fourteen months ago, Walt Weiss was managing Regis Jesuit High of Aurora, Colo., to a playoff semifinal game. Today, he's managing the Colorado Rockies toward what he hopes will be a National League playoff berth. Asked to compare the assignments during a recent interview in his office at Coors Field, he said, "Obviously, here the stakes are higher and the demands are a lot tougher. But I don't have to deal with parents. " Along with some big differences, there are some similarities.
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