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Job Transfers

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1999
A Superior Court judge on Thursday certified a class-action lawsuit by 119 former Metropolitan Transportation Authority officers, who allege that their seniority and qualifications were overlooked when they started working for the Sheriff's Department. The MTA's police force was merged into the Sheriff's Department and the Los Angeles Police Department in 1997.
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REAL ESTATE
September 5, 1999 | ROBERT J. BRUSS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: About a year ago, we took out one of those 125% mortgages at 11.25% interest on our home. We used the money to pay off our credit cards and other high-interest rate loans. The payment relief was wonderful, but now we must sell our home due to a job transfer. Our problem is how to sell our home, which has a mortgage that's way above its market value. There is no way we can pay the lender about $40,000 more than our house is worth.
NEWS
December 1, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A white teacher accused of racial insensitivity for reading a book titled "Nappy Hair" to her black and Hispanic pupils requested a transfer out of her Brooklyn school district, saying she fears for her life. "I can't take the fear and wondering every day what might happen," Ruth Sherman said.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1998 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reacting to low oil prices and the effects of the sale of nonstrategic assets, Occidental Petroleum Corp. is cutting 80 jobs at its Westwood headquarters and transferring 150 other workers to its recently established Oxy Services subsidiary. The corporate staff will shrink to fewer than 190 after the moves are complete, down from 443 at the beginning of the year, according to a letter sent to headquarters employees last Tuesday by Occidental Petroleum President Dale R. Laurance.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1998 | STUART SILVERSTEIN
Faced with child-care emergencies, growing workloads and other demands on their nerves and time, many American workers are resorting to an old ploy: They're playing hooky. The comeback in absenteeism in many American workplaces is reflected in a new survey showing that unscheduled no-shows shot up 25% over the last year, hitting the highest level since 1991.
NEWS
August 9, 1998 | Reuters
The commanding officer of an air squadron involved in the deaths of 20 Italian skiers was relieved of his duties and reassigned, the Marine Corps said Saturday. The military says an EA-6B Prowler from the squadron of Lt. Col. Richard Muegge was flying too low and too fast on a Feb. 3 training mission when it severed two lift cables in the Italian Alps, dropping the gondola carrying the skiers to the ground.
NEWS
July 20, 1998 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 25 mostly happy years as a salesman and manager in the packaging and food industries, Denis A. Leonhardt suffered a bad jolt in 1996 when he was laid off from a $65,000-a-year job. Last month, he finally went back to work--as a $13.50-an-hour computer technician. Leonhardt, 56, who shares a Dana Point apartment with his wife, Diana, said the comedown to a job paying less than half of what he once earned "is hard. Our lifestyle has obviously changed.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1998 | Patrice Apodaca
Preferred Credit Corp. is laying off 41 of its approximately 300 workers and transferring 21 others from its Irvine headquarters to Texas. The moves are part of an ongoing restructuring of the mortgage lender by the Minneapolis investment firm NJK Holdings, which acquired Preferred last October. Last month, about 25 workers were dismissed. Under the restructuring, Preferred will focus on the wholesale loan business, while Cashnet Financial Group Inc.
NEWS
June 21, 1998 | JOSEPH COLEMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It wasn't divorce, a husband's death or an independent streak that pushed Hisako Kawaguchi into six years as a single mother. It was company orders. Her husband, Haruo, was shifted by his pharmaceutical company to a provincial branch office, turning the couple and their three children into one of the hundreds of thousands of Japanese families split up by job transfers. "I was so exhausted by the end of the week," said Hisako Kawaguchi, who is a research librarian for the same company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1998 | STEVE CHAWKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Navy will station 16 sophisticated radar planes and transfer 1,100 jobs to Point Mugu Naval Air Weapons Station beginning in the next few months, officials announced Tuesday. The formal assignment of the E-2C Hawkeyes to Point Mugu caps a topsy-turvy struggle to secure the four squadrons and the millions of dollars they are expected to pour into the local economy.
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