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BUSINESS
June 24, 2010
WASHINGTON (AP) — Initial claims for jobless benefits fell by the most in two months last week, but remain above levels consistent with healthy job growth. The Labor Department says that new claims dropped by 19,000 to a seasonally adjusted 457,000. That's slightly below economists' forecasts of 460,000. First-time requests for unemployment insurance have been stuck at about 450,000 since the beginning of this year. New claims dropped steadily last year after reaching a peak of 651,000 in March 2009.
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BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Shan Li
Initial jobless claims plunged last week to their lowest level in nearly seven years, a sign that the labor market was picking up traction. The number of first-time claims for unemployment benefits dropped to 300,000 last week, a decrease of 32,000 from the week before, the Labor Department said Thursday. The last time claims were this low was in May 2007. The four-week average, which is a less volatile barometer, fell by 4,750 last week to 316,250. The Labor Department said "there were no special factors" that affected the week's data.
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BUSINESS
July 22, 2010 | From Reuters
New U.S. claims for jobless benefits climbed more steeply than anticipated last week, according to a Labor Department report on Thursday that further underlined the drag on economic activity from persistently weak job markets. Initial claims for state unemployment benefits rose 37,000 to a seasonally adjusted 464,000 in the week ended July 17, the department said, more than erasing a decline in the prior week that included the Independence Day holiday. Analysts polled by Reuters had forecast claims would rise to 445,000 from the previously reported 429,000 in the July 10 week, which was revised slightly down to 427,000 in Thursday's report.
OPINION
April 10, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
How's this for irony: Having allowed federal unemployment benefits to run out in December, some lawmakers are balking at a bill to renew them retroactively because it might be hard to figure out who should receive them. Congress made this task far harder than it should have been, but the technical challenges aren't insurmountable. Lawmakers should restore the benefits now and leave them in place until the unemployment rate reaches a more reasonable level. Federal jobless benefits, which are provided only in times of high unemployment, kick in after people have exhausted their state benefits, which typically last for six months.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2009 | Don Lee and Tiffany Hsu
The nation's jobless rate unexpectedly jumped last month to 9.7% from 9.4% in July, the government reported today, as employers shed 216,000 jobs over the month. Although the payroll cuts were generally in line with analysts' expectations, the sharp increase in the number of unemployed was higher than projections. It provided the latest sign that the labor market remains grim despite recent indications that the broader economy is on the mend. By the government's count, more than 14.9 million Americans are jobless on this Labor Day weekend.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2010 | By Lisa Mascaro, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Senate approved legislation Wednesday to extend unemployment benefits for 2.5 million jobless Americans, clearing the way for House passage and President Obama's swift signature. The 59-39 vote followed weeks of GOP efforts to block the bill. Democrats managed to break the filibuster Tuesday with the help of two Republicans, but final Senate passage came only after a lengthy debate Wednesday, which the minority party insisted upon. The House is expected to approve the measure Thursday.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Initial jobless claims unexpectedly jumped to a two-month high of 360,000 last week, the Labor Department said Thursday, but the rise could reflect annual summer shutdowns at auto plants. The number of people applying for first-time unemployment benefits for the week ending Saturday was up 16,000 from the previous week. Analysts had expected claims to dip to about 340,000. The figure was the highest since the week ending May 11, and brought claims over the 350,000 level that economists say indicates moderate labor market growth.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2010 | By David Pierson
Six months after graduating from university, Guan Jian was unemployed and living in an 8-by-8-foot rented room on the fringes of this sprawling capital. His quarters were so hastily built that the landlord didn't bother to include a bathroom. When duty calls, Guan must trudge to the neighborhood toilet. Yet at $65 a month, it's all he can afford. Money is so tight at times that he has learned to suppress his hunger with a single steamed bun a day. This wasn't how things were supposed to be for Guan, a 24-year-old broadcast journalism graduate who sports an easy smile and has a love affair with foreign film.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Initial jobless claims fell sharply last week to their lowest level in three months, the Labor Department said Thursday, as a private report showed layoffs eased in February. About 323,000 people filed for first-time unemployment benefits in the week ending Saturday, down from 349,000, the previous week, the Labor Department said. The falloff was steeper than that expected by analysts, who had forecast 338,000 first-time claims. Last week's figure was the lowest since the end of November.
OPINION
December 11, 2009
Money always talks Re "Decision near on tab for Jackson service," Dec. 6 Once again, private campaign contributions influence public policy, as the City Council may not push Anschutz Entertainment Group to defray the public cost of the Michael Jackson memorial service. I take issue with Councilwoman Jan Perry's claim that it's a "stupid way to think" that AEG owns Los Angeles. I think it would be stupid to assume AEG gets no payback for its huge donations to city politicians.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - As soon as the Democratic-controlled Senate passed a measure Monday to extend unemployment aid to jobless Americans, a beleaguered group of House Republicans from states with high unemployment rates called on Speaker John A. Boehner to follow suit. But the Republican lawmakers are fighting an uphill battle against their leaders, and Boehner has shown little interest in passing an unemployment insurance extension, panning the Senate bill as unworkable. With Congress about to leave town on a two-week recess, no further action is expected to assist the more than 2.2 million Americans who had their long-term benefits cut after aid expired in December.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Initial jobless claims unexpectedly increased last week but remained low in a positive sign for labor market growth before Friday's jobs report. About 326,000 people applied for first-time unemployment benefits in the week ended Saturday, the Labor Department said Thursday. The figure was up from 310,000 the previous week, the lowest level since September. Analysts had projected a smaller increase to 320,000 last week. PHOTOS: Richest and poorest cities in America The four-week average was little changed at 319,500 and pointed to an improved jobs situation in March.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By Shan Li
California's economy perked up in February, adding 58,800 net new jobs and gaining some momentum after a lackluster showing the month before. The job gains helped push the unemployment rate down to 8% from 8.1% in January, the state's Employment Development Department reported Friday. "California employment is coming back very nicely after a bump in the month of January," said Sung Won Sohn, an economics professor at Cal State Channel Islands. "We are seeing more and more cylinders in the economic engine firing.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Initial jobless claims fell sharply last week to their lowest level in three months, the Labor Department said Thursday, as a private report showed layoffs eased in February. About 323,000 people filed for first-time unemployment benefits in the week ending Saturday, down from 349,000, the previous week, the Labor Department said. The falloff was steeper than that expected by analysts, who had forecast 338,000 first-time claims. Last week's figure was the lowest since the end of November.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2014 | Marc Lifsher
Hundreds of thousands of jobless Californians last year appealed decisions of the troubled Employment Development Department, adding to months of delays in getting unemployment benefits. After holding hearings, administrative law judges at the California Unemployment Insurance Appeals Board rejected many of the EDD's cursory, highly technical decisions. They threw out or revised more than half of the earlier denials, belatedly awarding long-sought assistance of up to $450 per week.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Initial jobless claims rose last week, but remained at a level consistent with moderate labor market growth amid mixed signals recently about the strength of the economic recovery. About 339,000 people applied for first-time unemployment benefits in the week ended Saturday, up from 331,000 the previous week, the Labor Department said Thursday. Economists had projected a slight decrease to 330,000. The weekly claims figure, a key labor market indicator, has settled in recent weeks to about 335,000 after the usual holiday season volatility.
OPINION
May 23, 2010 | Arlie Hochschild
The jobless in the United States lose far more than their paychecks; they also lose precious social support. Research has found that the health of those who lose jobs is likely to decline and the risk of dying rises. Many not only lose daily contact with factory and office friends, they also retreat from other social interaction. Compared with the employed, the jobless are less likely to vote, volunteer, see friends and talk to family. Even on weekends, the jobless spend more time alone than those with jobs That's not good.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2009 | By Tiffany Hsu and Marc Lifsher
Stung by criticism over delayed unemployment extension checks, the Schwarzenegger administration acted to speed up payments to 121,000 long-term jobless Californians, many of whom have been without benefits for more than a month. Checks could arrive as early as midweek, with filings possibly starting Sunday, said Loree Levy, spokeswoman for the state Employment Development Department. The jobs agency had said days earlier that the payments from a federally approved extension of at least 14 weeks could be delayed until the week of Christmas -- or even into the new year.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2014 | Alana Semuels
The phone begins to ring at 8 a.m. with incessant calls from creditors. Kevin Meyer has stopped picking up because he's sick of explaining the truth: that there's no money coming in, so he can't pay his bills. Two years ago, Meyer, 51, had a six-figure salary, a sizable 401(k) and the knowledge that he could support his wife and daughter. But he lost his job as a spokesman for a car rental company, and though he soon found another position, he was downsized again four months later.
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