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BUSINESS
January 7, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
If your New Year's resolution is to change jobs this year, consider this ranking of least-stressful jobs. In a a new ranking for 2014, CareerCast.com looked at 200 careers and weighed all sorts of factors that contribute to worker stress: travel (lots of travel increases stress), meeting the public (introverts, beware), and whether a job puts your life or that of others at risk (a no-brainer).  Other factors included deadlines, environmental conditions and physical demands. The careers website cautioned that there are no stress-free jobs -- every occupation has its own challenges, but nonetheless here are the top 10 least-stressful jobs: 10. Drill press operator 9. Multimedia artist 8. Librarian 7. Medical records technician 6. Dietitian 5. Seamstress or tailor 4. Tenured university professor 3. Jeweler 2. Hair stylist 1. Audiologist, which d iagnoses and treats hearing problems.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By David Zahniser and James Rainey
Three months after it painted L.A. as a metropolis stumbling into decline, the Los Angeles 2020 Commission offered 13 recommendations Wednesday that it said would attract jobs and "put the city on a path to fiscal stability. " The group of prominent business, labor and civic leaders called on elected officials to enact a wide-ranging series of policy initiatives: increasing the minimum wage, combining giant twin harbors into a single port, altering oversight of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and bolstering efforts to promote regional tourism.
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NATIONAL
January 16, 2011 | By Andrew Malcolm
You probably could never guess what problem Americans see as the No. 1 job for the No. 1 elected official to address right now: It's jobs/unemployment ? again ? still. That's been the major concern along with the overall economy across the country for way more than a year now. In his 2010 State of the Union address, President Obama asked himself: "How long should we wait?" Republican Scott Brown had just pulled off a historic Senate election upset in Massachusetts, in large part because of voter unhappiness with the president's healthcare preoccupation instead of the stagnant jobs situation.
SPORTS
April 5, 2014 | By Chris Foster
The entire starting secondary returns for UCLA. And none of those guys should get comfortable. If there is one area where the Bruins have an overabundance of talent, it's at defensive back. By fall, they will have 14 scholarship players in the secondary. "That's always good," said safety Randall Goforth . "We were limited in numbers last season. It was pretty tough. Now we got more people here and more experience. It's less teaching and more evolving. I like it. " But that comes with a warning, and Goforth knows it. "You better compete for your job every day," he said.
OPINION
December 29, 2012
Re “ Corporate tax rate may be lowered ,” Business, Dec. 25 Republicans have agreed that loopholes should be closed for corporations. The most egregious loophole may be the one that in effect gives interest-free loans to U.S. corporations to invest overseas. I am referring to the loophole whereby they are excused from paying taxes until the money earned is “repatriated.” If the president is willing to lower the rate to competitive levels, he should insist on changes to this tax break.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1993
A question that puzzles me is: If President Clinton eliminates 500,000 jobs in government in order to save money and then generate 500,000 jobs to help the economy, is that not a net gain of zero? GLORIA BURRUS Simi Valley
OPINION
April 10, 2013
Re "To create jobs, U.S. must spend," Opinion, April 5 Dimitri B. Papadimitriou assumes that government spending creates growth. It may create growth in the drone-building industry or in public pensions, but we have to question whether that's good for the economy. Papadimitriou compares adding to our deficit to the hopeful action of a private borrower getting a home mortgage. There are important differences. A home buyer can refinance only a few times, while the government can add debt endlessly.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez and Shan Li, Los Angeles Times
Just a few years ago, California was hemorrhaging tens of thousands of jobs and had one of the highest unemployment rates in the nation. But on Friday the Golden State reached a turning point: Helped by a recovering housing market, its jobless rate plunged to 8.6% in May, down from 9% in April and the lowest level in nearly five years. The improved economy has cut the number of unemployed Californians to 1.5 million from a peak of 2.3 million in 2010. Economists said the latest batch of government data showed the state is creating jobs faster than the labor force is growing, a sign of true strengthening in the labor market.
OPINION
June 14, 2012
Re "School posts may be tough to fill," June 11 Regarding the search to replace three chancellors of public colleges and universities, The Times quotes Scott Himelstein, president of the community colleges Board of Governors, as saying, "I think the governor and Legislature are very clear in not wanting to consider any raises in executive compensation. " It's a great sentiment but I have zero confidence that it will happen. There will be extensive national searches, and when the final candidates are selected, the public statements will say that the salaries offered were justified and necessary to attract the best person for each of these exceedingly difficult and complex positions.
OPINION
May 4, 2012
Re "Japanese firm wins Metro job," May 1 With our economy so fragile, how dare L.A. County transportation planners award a contract to build rail cars to a Japanese company? We need to have the good people of California working. This was a great opportunity to employ people in our state. Those at the L.A. County Metropolitan Transportation Authority who made this decision need to be replaced. As a longtime resident and taxpayer, I'm sickened by their low regard for our workforce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
A field of candidates - many political heavyweights and city insiders - are locked in an expensive battle to become Long Beach's newest mayor, a job that comes with expectations of reviving both the port city's economy and reputation. The April 8 election has candidates vying for city attorney and a majority of Long Beach's nine council seats, setting the stage for one of the most significant shake-ups in city politics in more than a decade. But all eyes are on the mayor's race, and with the crowded field a June runoff is likely.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2014 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON - The U.S. economy shook off the winter doldrums and added a healthy batch of new jobs last month, a reassuring sign that the labor market recovery remains on track. The gain of 192,000 jobs in March, reported Friday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, indicated that the hiring slowdown earlier in the winter was temporary and stemmed from the unusually cold weather across much of the country. All the jobs added last month came in the private sector, lifting total non-government payrolls to a new peak.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2014 | By Don Lee
TAIPEI, Taiwan - For decades, relations between Taiwan and its giant neighbor China have been one of the great success stories of the ending of the Cold War. Slowly but surely, the two nations have pulled back from half a century of bellicose confrontation and in recent years embraced a level of political and economic cooperation that seemed to promise new riches for both. But today, for many Taiwanese, the bloom is off the rose. This disenchantment lay behind the outbreak of angry protests from Taiwanese students that are in their third week.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | Shan Li
The ongoing drought in California could dampen employment growth in coming years and have a ripple effect on several industries in the state, according to a UCLA report released Wednesday. Economists said in the quarterly forecast that arid conditions in 2013, the driest year on record for the Golden State, could diminish the fishing and manufacturing sectors in the state. However, the effect depends on whether the drought is "normal" or the beginning of "a long arid period. " California's employment could be suppressed about 0.2% during the next few years because of the drought, the report concluded.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Chad Terhune
Even with 1.2 million people enrolled by Monday's deadline, California's health exchange isn't done adding to the Obamacare rolls - and it won't be for quite some time. In the months to come, it's estimated that several hundred thousand more Californians could qualify for a special enrollment period as college students graduate, families move and workers change jobs. But health insurers say the state's current rules for late sign-ups rely too much on the honor system and invite abuse by people waiting until they get sick.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge Friday ruled that a front-runner in the race for county assessor can't call himself a "deputy assessor" on the ballot. Candidate Omar Haroon, an appraiser in the assessor's office, had filed a court case contending that the occupation listed by rival candidate Jeffrey Prang, a West Hollywood councilman who also works as a public affairs manager for the county agency, was misleading. The assessor's office does not use "deputy assessor" as an official job title.
OPINION
March 30, 2014 | By Emily Koss
"Emily, would you please put a bowl of water on the floor so I can drink like a dog?" It was a sweet and funny request, and I was happy to do it. But it was also a reminder, once again, that I work for a 4-year-old. You've probably heard about the vast array of problems facing my generation as we graduate and attempt to enter the job market. As a 24-year-old recent college grad, I can tell you that what you've been hearing is true. I graduated last May with unpaid internships waiting for me in Mexico, Spain and Nicaragua.
OPINION
March 28, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
University officials and the NCAA have been reluctant to acknowledge that top-tier college football programs are run these days less as athletic programs than as businesses. But a labor administrator's decision Wednesday that Northwestern University's scholarship football players are, in fact, employees with the right to unionize should get their attention. This issue has been bubbling for decades as major sports programs evolved from important but ancillary parts of a college's mission into powerful businesses enriched by multimillion-dollar TV contracts and merchandising revenue, all built on the labor of student-athletes who received no compensation beyond scholarships.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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