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April 17, 1992 | BLAISE SIMPSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jocelyn Moorhouse answers the door barefoot, clutching one black suede shoe in her hand. "I lost the other one--can you wait a minute while I find it?" she says, with an engaging grin, as she hustles off to search under the bed at the Chateau Marmont. Moorhouse, 31, has been riding enough of a whirlwind to have been blown right out of her shoes.
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NEWS
September 27, 1998 | Peter Rainer
This pleasantly twisted little 1991 picture marks a sharp and self-confident debut for Australian writer-director Jocelyn Moorhouse. It's a film about trust, love and control, about the differences between truth and reality and the risks you run when you leave yourself open to intimacy. Hugo Weaving stars a a blind but passionate photographer, Genevieve Picot (pictured) as his acerbic housekeeper and Russell Crowe as a cheerful dishwasher (Bravo early Friday at 1 a.m.).
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NEWS
July 14, 1996 | Peter Rainer
This pleasantly twisted 1991 film marks a sharp and self-confident debut for Australian writer-director Jocelyn Moorhouse. Hugo Weaving (pictured, with Genevieve Picot) stars a a blind but passionate photographer, Picot as his acerbic housekeeper and Russell Crowe as a cheerful dishwasher, whom the photographer tentatively befriends. (Bravo Wednesday at 8:05 p.m. and Thursday at 11 a.m.)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1992 | BLAISE SIMPSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jocelyn Moorhouse answers the door barefoot, clutching one black suede shoe in her hand. "I lost the other one--can you wait a minute while I find it?" she says, with an engaging grin, as she hustles off to search under the bed at the Chateau Marmont. Moorhouse, 31, has been riding enough of a whirlwind to have been blown right out of her shoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Proof" is a pleasantly twisted little picture that has the kind of off-center impact money can't buy. A sharp and self-confident debut for Australian writer-director Jocelyn Moorhouse, it takes an unlikely protagonist and involves him in curious, darkly comic situations leading to a graceful conclusion. Not at all bad for a film that came in well under a million dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1995
Congratulations should go to Whitney Otto, Jocelyn Moorhouse and Jane Anderson for a fine novel and film adaptation in "How to Make an American Quilt" ("A Novelist Says Thanks to Filmmakers," Calendar, Nov. 6). Otto is fortunate. The Hollywood film industry created a sensitive quality version of her text. How often does this happen? Rarely. Yet filmmakers who alter texts and important thematic elements of the text for the purpose of enhancing the film's commercial marketability are often undone by their own mercantilistic machinations.
NEWS
July 22, 1993 | MARY HELEN BERG
"Proof," a simply told Australian tale of human frailty, obsessive love, loyalty and betrayal, tells the story of Martin, a blind man who does not trust what he cannot see. Martin's bitterness goes back to his boyhood, when his mother describes the garden outside his window and tells him about the gardener who tends it. One day, although his mother insists the gardener is raking the yard, Martin realizes he can't hear the man at work. He calls his mother a liar and begins a lifetime of mistrust.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Muriel's Wedding" is the event Muriel wants so much to happen but fears never will. How is she to feel otherwise when her frightful best friends insist she surrender a bridal bouquet she's just caught. "Give it back, give it back," they yap at her like well-dressed terriers. "Nobody's ever going to marry you." That scene, which opens P.J. Hogan's marvelous debut film, sets the tone for what is to come.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
With its impressive cast and its women's perspective on the nature of romantic relationships, "How to Make an American Quilt" sounds appealing before the fact. And once it's over, its aftertaste is warm and pleasant. But while the film is on the screen, things are not all they should be. For though made with care by Australian director Jocelyn Moorhouse, whose edgy "Proof" was a memorable debut, "American Quilt" is a rather ordinary experience.
NEWS
November 18, 1993 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lancer who regularly writes about film for The Times Orange County Edition.
Australian filmmakers have been surprising the world for a couple of decades now. That country doesn't put out many movies that score internationally, but the ones that do are often impressive. Peter Weir, who made "Picnic at Hanging Rock" and "The Last Wave," is probably the most influential of the Down Under directors, but men like Fred Schepisi ("The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith") and Bruce Beresford ("Breaker Morant") have also had an impact.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Proof" is a pleasantly twisted little picture that has the kind of off-center impact money can't buy. A sharp and self-confident debut for Australian writer-director Jocelyn Moorhouse, it takes an unlikely protagonist and involves him in curious, darkly comic situations leading to a graceful conclusion. Not at all bad for a film that came in well under a million dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Sisterhood is powerful in "A Thousand Acres," and you'd think that would be enough. Certainly it seems to be in those moments when Michelle Pfeiffer and Jessica Lange triumphantly share the screen as embattled siblings in this adaptation of Jane Smiley's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel about the bonds and burdens of kinship and a gift that shatters a family. Playing sisters has been a longtime aim of these actresses, and they handle the opportunity beautifully.
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