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Jocelyn Pook

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July 26, 1999 | JON BURLINGAME, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
British avant-garde composer Jocelyn Pook may be one of the luckiest musicians around. Not only did director Stanley Kubrick ask her to write original music for his "Eyes Wide Shut," he actually used it. The legendary director was well known for his use of classical music: Strauss and Ligeti in "2001: A Space Odyssey," Beethoven and Purcell in "A Clockwork Orange," Handel and Schubert in "Barry Lyndon," Bartok and Penderecki in "The Shining."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1999 | JON BURLINGAME, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
British avant-garde composer Jocelyn Pook may be one of the luckiest musicians around. Not only did director Stanley Kubrick ask her to write original music for his "Eyes Wide Shut," he actually used it. The legendary director was well known for his use of classical music: Strauss and Ligeti in "2001: A Space Odyssey," Beethoven and Purcell in "A Clockwork Orange," Handel and Schubert in "Barry Lyndon," Bartok and Penderecki in "The Shining."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
The combination of sex and death (have I got your attention yet?) has always tantalized artists, especially as they age, and, if "Eyes Wide Shut" is any indication, most especially Stanley Kubrick. Far from the hot date-night movie the racy Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Jean-Luc Borde, a successful gerontologist who's practiced in affluent Versailles for 10 years, it is the crowning night of his career. The town's elite have come to his luxurious home to award him the coveted Order of Merit at an elaborate party hosted by his elegant wife, Isa. "I was like an orphan," he tells the crowd, "and you adopted me." It is a telling choice of words.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
The debut feature for writer-director Alice Winocour, “Augustine” features a bracing and powerful performance by the young performer known as Soko. Now playing in Los Angeles, the film is set in 19th century France, its story based on the ethically and emotionally complicated relationship that develops between Dr. Jean-Martin Charcot (played by Vincent Lindon) and the young woman (Soko) prone to fits of what was then called “hysteria” who would become his star patient. The scenes of Augustine having fits -- which were created in part by having Soko yanked about by unseen ropes and cables and in part by her yoga-induced flexibility -- are disconcerting to watch.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Time Out" is not just an especially subtle and thoughtful psychological drama, it's a provocative, even an unnerving one as well. It's the story of a daring impostor named Vincent, a world-class dissembler who goes to extraordinary lengths to carry out an increasingly elaborate deception. What does Vincent take all these pains to pretend to be? A man with a job.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2005 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"The Staircase," which begins tonight on the Sundance Channel and continues Mondays through the month, is an eight-part documentary about the 2001 death of businesswoman Kathleen Peterson and the ensuing trial of her writer-husband, Michael, who either found her dead at the bottom of a flight of stairs or killed her there himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2004 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Michael Radford's splendid film of "The Merchant of Venice" is so somber -- and rightly so -- for so much of the time that it's hard to remember it is one of Shakespeare's comedies, indeed regarded as one of his greatest. Radford, best known for the hugely successful "Il Postino," takes a subtle approach that reveals how charged with ambiguity the play is, which makes this "Merchant" emerge as remarkably immediate and contemporary without ever seeming to strain for this effect.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1999
Here is the list of Golden Globe Award nominees. * Best Motion Picture--Drama: "American Beauty," DreamWorks Pictures; "The End of the Affair," Columbia Pictures; "The Hurricane," Universal Pictures/Beacon Communications; "The Insider," Touchstone Pictures; "The Talented Mr. Ripley," Paramount Pictures/Miramax Films.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2002 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
It seems entirely appropriate that the four women who comprise the early music vocal ensemble Anonymous 4 would get snowed in in Omaha on Monday, the day after premiering their touring program "Wolcum Yule." The songs are wintry and Christmasy, and one is even called "Snow Carol." But soprano Johanna Maria Rose didn't appreciate the charming synchronicity of it all. "It was a day from hell," she said, by phone from tour stop No. 2, Arcata, Calif.
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