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January 14, 1995 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Art that intends to engage viewers rather than to just entertain them always leaves something out. This tactic forces onlookers to supply missing pieces from the storehouse of their minds. It's such a common practice it's usually taken for granted. Jochen Gerz, whose work is now surveyed in a traveling retrospective at the Newport Harbor Art Museum, is noticeable for making emptiness a centerpiece of his art, like the hole in a doughnut. Titled "People Speak," it ponders absence and longing.
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January 17, 1995 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the early '70s, Jochen Gerz was one of many "mail artists" sending cheaply reproduced work to colleagues and kindred spirits. Although driven by economic necessity, mail art emphasized the way artists were not only "producers" but also "consumers" of the work. Gerz spent Saturday afternoon at the Newport Harbor Art Museum, where his retrospective "People Speak" (review, F1) continues through March 19.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1995 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Art that intends to engage viewers rather than to just entertain them always leaves something out. This tactic forces onlookers to supply missing pieces from the storehouses of their minds. It's such a common practice that it usually is taken for granted. Jochen Gerz, whose work is surveyed in a traveling retrospective at the Newport Harbor Art Museum (through March 19), is noticeable for making emptiness a centerpiece of his art, like the hole in a doughnut.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1995 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Art that intends to engage viewers rather than to just entertain them always leaves something out. This tactic forces onlookers to supply missing pieces from the storehouses of their minds. It's such a common practice that it usually is taken for granted. Jochen Gerz, whose work is surveyed in a traveling retrospective at the Newport Harbor Art Museum (through March 19), is noticeable for making emptiness a centerpiece of his art, like the hole in a doughnut.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1995 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the early '70s, Jochen Gerz was one of many "mail artists" sending cheaply reproduced work to colleagues and kindred spirits. Although driven by economic necessity, mail art emphasized the way artists were not only "producers" but also "consumers" of the work. Gerz spent Saturday afternoon at the Newport Harbor Art Museum, where his retrospective "People Speak" (review, F1) continues through March 19.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1995 | CATHY CURTIS
Water seepage in a gallery and the art storage area of the Newport Harbor Art Museum has caused the cancellation of the traveling exhibition "Masculine Masquerade: Masculinity and Representation." It was to have opened April 21. The museum canceled the show because staff must use the exhibit space to examine all of the museum's 2,000-piece collection.
NEWS
February 16, 1995 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly contributes to the Times Orange County Edition.
We've all played with kaleidoscopes before, especially those cheap ones with the cardboard tubes and the bits of colored plastic. Put one end to your eye and turn the other end with your hand-- oooh, look at the pretty patterns! Most of us put the toys aside when we were no longer kids, or after stepping away from our more popular hippie attachments like tinted granny glasses and statuesque bong pipes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1987 | KRISTINE McKENNA
Time, memory and our relationship to the past are the subjects of an exhibition titled "Remembrances of Things Past," on view through Jan. 18 at the Long Beach Museum of Art. Housed in a stately old building, the Long Beach Museum is the ideal setting for an exhibition of this nature, and "Remembrances," curated by Connie Fitzsimons, delivers what it promises for the most part.
NEWS
March 9, 1995 | CATHY CURTIS, Cathy Curtis covers art for The Times Orange County Edition.
Although he must be the most famous person ever to attend the Liverpool College of Art in England, John Lennon surely would never have made his mark on 20th-Century culture had he stuck to drawing the knobby caricatures that were his youthful forte.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1995 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Art that intends to engage viewers rather than to just entertain them always leaves something out. This tactic forces onlookers to supply missing pieces from the storehouse of their minds. It's such a common practice it's usually taken for granted. Jochen Gerz, whose work is now surveyed in a traveling retrospective at the Newport Harbor Art Museum, is noticeable for making emptiness a centerpiece of his art, like the hole in a doughnut. Titled "People Speak," it ponders absence and longing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1992 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for The Times.
About two years ago, German-born artist Jochen Gerz took photographs of several friends who live on a small Northwestern island, a place he discovered by chance 10 years ago. He and his wife, Esther, who is also an artist, leave their Paris home to spend about two months out of the year there.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1986 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
"Behind the Eyes," opening Tuesday in USC's Fisher Gallery, "calls attention to contemporary German artists who are more interested in perception and psychology than in angst ," according to Van Deren Coke, director of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art's department of photography. Coke, who organized the traveling show, selected more than 50 photographs in black-and-white and color, as well as other works in a variety of media by eight German artists.
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