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Jock Sturges

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1990 | HAROLD MAASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The county Board of Supervisors is scheduled to act on a resolution condemning a federal grand jury investigation of a prominent local photographer caught up in an apparent FBI crackdown on sexually explicit photographs processed by commercial photo laboratories. At issue is an FBI investigation of photographer Jock Sturges, 43, whose work often depicts nude women and children.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1998
The Times article ("Child Porn Fight Focuses on 2 Photographers' Books," March 8) gives the wrong impression by lumping together the two photographers under attack, Jock Sturges and David Hamilton. The article creates the impression their work is similar when it is not. Sturges knows the people he photographs (boys and girls, men and women) as close friends and confidants. His models are, for the most part, naturalists (nudists, if you prefer), as is the photographer. The subjects are sans clothing before and after, as well as during the making of their portrait.
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NEWS
March 8, 1998 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The girl in the photograph is the archetypal kid sister. No more than 12, her body is a boy's, but her face is pure woman. The contrast is so intense that you almost don't notice: She's wearing a defiant gaze and nothing else. The photograph is alluring, arresting, fine art in the eyes of many. But in Alabama and South Carolina and Colorado and elsewhere, it's the ultimate indecency.
NEWS
March 8, 1998 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The girl in the photograph is the archetypal kid sister. No more than 12, her body is a boy's, but her face is pure woman. The contrast is so intense that you almost don't notice: She's wearing a defiant gaze and nothing else. The photograph is alluring, arresting, fine art in the eyes of many. But in Alabama and South Carolina and Colorado and elsewhere, it's the ultimate indecency.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prominent photographer Jock Sturges demanded Wednesday that the government return thousands of photographs and other property that it has held for seven months while deciding whether to charge him with child pornography. Sturges, whose nude portraits, many of them of children, are displayed in major galleries across the country, filed papers in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1998
The Times article ("Child Porn Fight Focuses on 2 Photographers' Books," March 8) gives the wrong impression by lumping together the two photographers under attack, Jock Sturges and David Hamilton. The article creates the impression their work is similar when it is not. Sturges knows the people he photographs (boys and girls, men and women) as close friends and confidants. His models are, for the most part, naturalists (nudists, if you prefer), as is the photographer. The subjects are sans clothing before and after, as well as during the making of their portrait.
NEWS
September 17, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a rare rebuke to prosecutors, a federal grand jury here has refused to indict Jock Sturges, a prominent fine-arts photographer who was the subject of a 17-month investigation concerning child pornography. The inquiry had drawn widespread protests from artists, politicians and civil liberties attorneys as an improper intrusion on the right to free expression. The San Francisco Board of Supervisors adopted a resolution last year urging authorities to drop the probe. U.S. Atty. William T.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1991
I would like to respond to your article "Southland Jobs on the Line in Bush Defense Plan" (Sept. 28) detailing the effects of the Bush policy change on Southern California's defense industry. Enough already. The aerospace and defense industries are loaded with the country's best and brightest. When will they get the idea that industry survival means change, like it has meant for the financial services, insurance and manufacturing industries?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1990
I read with shock and anger the July 5 account of the grand jury investigation of San Francisco photographer Jock Sturges ("Photo Lab Sets Off FBI Probe"). That the police can forcibly enter the home of a citizen, search and seize his possessions including his means of livelihood and then hold them for months without so much as filing charges is a chilling thought. That this power has now been used against an artist over an opinion of what constitutes pornography is outrageous.
NEWS
February 19, 1998 | From Associated Press
A grand jury indicted the nation's largest bookseller, Barnes & Noble, on child pornography charges involving the sale of books by noted photographers whose work includes pictures of nude children. State Atty. Gen. Bill Pryor said Wednesday that he started the investigation after receiving complaints about two books: "The Age of Innocence" by French photographer David Hamilton and "Radiant Identities" by San Francisco photographer Jock Sturges.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1991
I would like to respond to your article "Southland Jobs on the Line in Bush Defense Plan" (Sept. 28) detailing the effects of the Bush policy change on Southern California's defense industry. Enough already. The aerospace and defense industries are loaded with the country's best and brightest. When will they get the idea that industry survival means change, like it has meant for the financial services, insurance and manufacturing industries?
NEWS
September 17, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a rare rebuke to prosecutors, a federal grand jury here has refused to indict Jock Sturges, a prominent fine-arts photographer who was the subject of a 17-month investigation concerning child pornography. The inquiry had drawn widespread protests from artists, politicians and civil liberties attorneys as an improper intrusion on the right to free expression. The San Francisco Board of Supervisors adopted a resolution last year urging authorities to drop the probe. U.S. Atty. William T.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prominent photographer Jock Sturges demanded Wednesday that the government return thousands of photographs and other property that it has held for seven months while deciding whether to charge him with child pornography. Sturges, whose nude portraits, many of them of children, are displayed in major galleries across the country, filed papers in U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1990 | HAROLD MAASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The county Board of Supervisors is scheduled to act on a resolution condemning a federal grand jury investigation of a prominent local photographer caught up in an apparent FBI crackdown on sexually explicit photographs processed by commercial photo laboratories. At issue is an FBI investigation of photographer Jock Sturges, 43, whose work often depicts nude women and children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1991
The enforcement of pornography laws is certainly a necessary pursuit, but from the outset of the federal case against acclaimed fine-arts photographer Jock Sturges, the instinct was that the FBI had the wrong man. Now a federal grand jury has agreed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1991
The protection of children from sexual abuse took a big step forward with a state law requiring professionals most frequently in contact with children--teachers, pediatricians, child counselors and others--to report suspected cases to authorities. There was good reason to add photo lab technicians to that list in 1988 because they come in contact with pictures of children that may reveal sexual abuse or child pornography.
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