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Jodie Whittaker

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2006 | Susan King
JODIE WHITTAKER was such a novice in front of the camera that on her first day on the set of "Venus" she had no idea movies were shot out of sequence. "I said, 'Why are we not filming the first scene?' " Whittaker won the pivotal role of Jessie in Roger Michell's romantic drama "Venus" with a professional resume that listed just eight days of work on a TV movie. Jessie is a surly teenager who comes to live with her staid great-uncle, an aging actor (Leslie Phillips).
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In "Attack the Block," the feature writing and directing debut of British comedian Joe Cornish, an alien invasion occurs in a London public housing complex, and only a group of teenagers seems to notice. Pulsing with a rowdy energy, the film works as both a sci-fi horror flick and a teen adventure film. The greatest turn that Cornish pulls off is opening the movie with his protagonists mugging a woman (Jodie Whittaker) and still somehow making them seem, as the story unfolds, worth getting to know (while never excusing their nascent thuggery)
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2010 | By Gary Goldstein, Special to the Los Angeles Times
You've seen it all before in movies by Guy Ritchie and Quentin Tarantino and every imitator in between. And yet, taken on its own merits, the dark Irish crime comedy "Perrier's Bounty," directed by Ian FitzGibbon, proves a fast-paced and enjoyable if violent diversion that revels in its quirky characters, committed performances and involving twists. Anchored by an energetic turn by the versatile Cillian Murphy ("Red Eye," "28 Days Later") as Michael, a "perpetual waster" with a ticking clock on his debt to scary gangster Darren Perrier ( Brendan Gleeson)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2010
The warm and charming "White Wedding" is like "The Hangover" off steroids. It's another get-me-to-the-church-on-time obstacle course but filled with smart social commentary, romantic wisdom, credible complications and memorable characters. Along the way, director Jann Turner (who co-wrote the script with the film's co-leads Kenneth Nkosi and Rapulana Seiphemo) provides an absorbing physical and cultural snapshot of contemporary South Africa that deepens but never burdens this buoyant, energetic effort.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2010
The warm and charming "White Wedding" is like "The Hangover" off steroids. It's another get-me-to-the-church-on-time obstacle course but filled with smart social commentary, romantic wisdom, credible complications and memorable characters. Along the way, director Jann Turner (who co-wrote the script with the film's co-leads Kenneth Nkosi and Rapulana Seiphemo) provides an absorbing physical and cultural snapshot of contemporary South Africa that deepens but never burdens this buoyant, energetic effort.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In "Attack the Block," the feature writing and directing debut of British comedian Joe Cornish, an alien invasion occurs in a London public housing complex, and only a group of teenagers seems to notice. Pulsing with a rowdy energy, the film works as both a sci-fi horror flick and a teen adventure film. The greatest turn that Cornish pulls off is opening the movie with his protagonists mugging a woman (Jodie Whittaker) and still somehow making them seem, as the story unfolds, worth getting to know (while never excusing their nascent thuggery)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2006 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Three years ago, Peter O'Toole expressed dismay at receiving an honorary Oscar, saying he was "still in the game." The transporting performance he gives in "Venus" proves that he was not kidding. Told with wit, genuine poignancy and all kinds of humor, "Venus" (opening Thursday) charts the unlikely relationship between a man in his 70s and a young woman more than half a century his junior.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2006 | Chuck Culpepper, Times Staff Writer
WHERE many a 24-year-old film debutante might turn gelatinous alongside P-P-P-Peter O'Toole, say hello to Jodie Whittaker, who plunged herself into Roger Michell's "Venus," emerged to wows from co-actors and critics, and wound up saying of the globally esteemed O'Toole, "He's got really good banter." A hint to how she navigated such rare air with such aplomb: She's got really good banter too.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
It has been a long time since the Cold War crumbled to dust, making a small mockery of decades of mutually assured paranoia. Those nuclear arsenals, those drop drills, those bad dreams - what were they all for? Kids these days have no idea. Frankly, it's hard to remember myself. One corollary benefit of that time is a great lore and literature of espionage, fictional and factual, a cornerstone of pop culture and childhood play over the last half of the 20th century - and with a change of players, into this one. (Hello, "Homeland.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Beginning with "Mystic River" four years ago, Clint Eastwood has been on a critical roll. That 2003 film earned Academy Awards for stars Sean Penn and Tim Robbins, then Eastwood became the oldest filmmaker -- he was 74 at the time -- to win the best director Oscar for 2004's "Million Dollar Baby."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2010 | By Gary Goldstein, Special to the Los Angeles Times
You've seen it all before in movies by Guy Ritchie and Quentin Tarantino and every imitator in between. And yet, taken on its own merits, the dark Irish crime comedy "Perrier's Bounty," directed by Ian FitzGibbon, proves a fast-paced and enjoyable if violent diversion that revels in its quirky characters, committed performances and involving twists. Anchored by an energetic turn by the versatile Cillian Murphy ("Red Eye," "28 Days Later") as Michael, a "perpetual waster" with a ticking clock on his debt to scary gangster Darren Perrier ( Brendan Gleeson)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2006 | Chuck Culpepper, Times Staff Writer
WHERE many a 24-year-old film debutante might turn gelatinous alongside P-P-P-Peter O'Toole, say hello to Jodie Whittaker, who plunged herself into Roger Michell's "Venus," emerged to wows from co-actors and critics, and wound up saying of the globally esteemed O'Toole, "He's got really good banter." A hint to how she navigated such rare air with such aplomb: She's got really good banter too.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2006 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Three years ago, Peter O'Toole expressed dismay at receiving an honorary Oscar, saying he was "still in the game." The transporting performance he gives in "Venus" proves that he was not kidding. Told with wit, genuine poignancy and all kinds of humor, "Venus" (opening Thursday) charts the unlikely relationship between a man in his 70s and a young woman more than half a century his junior.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2006 | Susan King
JODIE WHITTAKER was such a novice in front of the camera that on her first day on the set of "Venus" she had no idea movies were shot out of sequence. "I said, 'Why are we not filming the first scene?' " Whittaker won the pivotal role of Jessie in Roger Michell's romantic drama "Venus" with a professional resume that listed just eight days of work on a TV movie. Jessie is a surly teenager who comes to live with her staid great-uncle, an aging actor (Leslie Phillips).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2006 | Patrick Goldstein, Times Staff Writer
Peter O'Toole and I were supposed to have lunch Saturday, but the crown prince of British theater and film became ill at the last minute and, under doctor's orders, was forced to stay in London. In his stead, he sent along Roger Michell, who directed him in "Venus," a delightful romantic comedy due out in December that has already made a splash at the Toronto Film Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
It's tough to beat a good crime drama for many reasons, only some of which have to do with guns, car chases and wise but weary men saying things like "I'm too old for this. " Crime punctures the delicate scrim of daily life: The perfect family, the orderly office, the quiet town. Its investigation goes even further, yanking the coverlet from the unmade bed of human nature, exposing the stains, the cigarette burns, the secrets. That's why murder mysteries remain the most popular stories on television - through them we can safely examine the tenuous nature of civilization.
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