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Jody David Armour

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NEWS
February 27, 2000 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You don't have to be an expert. Just alert. And if so, you probably made a mental note when 25-year-old Atlanta Braves relief pitcher John Rocker blithely ticked off his now-infamous . . .er. . . reservations to a Sports Illustrated reporter about why he would never want to pitch for a New York team. You probably filed it under Marge Schott, Fuzzy Zoeller, Reggie White, Jimmy "The Greek" Snyder or Al Campanis. It's happened before. No doubt, it'll happen again.
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NEWS
February 27, 2000 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You don't have to be an expert. Just alert. And if so, you probably made a mental note when 25-year-old Atlanta Braves relief pitcher John Rocker blithely ticked off his now-infamous . . .er. . . reservations to a Sports Illustrated reporter about why he would never want to pitch for a New York team. You probably filed it under Marge Schott, Fuzzy Zoeller, Reggie White, Jimmy "The Greek" Snyder or Al Campanis. It's happened before. No doubt, it'll happen again.
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BOOKS
August 10, 1997 | RANDALL KENNEDY, Randall Kennedy is the author of "Race, Crime, and the Law" and a professor at Harvard Law School
Both of these books are largely concerned with the negative image of African Americans in the public mind and the baleful effects of that imagery on private conduct and public policies. Both contend that African Americans continue to suffer a peculiar and unfair stigmatization created by the widespread association of blackness with dangerous criminality. Both maintain, in Jody David Armour's words, that "the most disturbing source of dread in modern America [is] Black violence."
BOOKS
August 10, 1997 | RANDALL KENNEDY, Randall Kennedy is the author of "Race, Crime, and the Law" and a professor at Harvard Law School
Both of these books are largely concerned with the negative image of African Americans in the public mind and the baleful effects of that imagery on private conduct and public policies. Both contend that African Americans continue to suffer a peculiar and unfair stigmatization created by the widespread association of blackness with dangerous criminality. Both maintain, in Jody David Armour's words, that "the most disturbing source of dread in modern America [is] Black violence."
OPINION
May 9, 1999 | ANGELA E. OH, Angela E. Oh served as a member of the advisory board to President Clinton's initiative on race and is currently a visiting scholar and lecturer at UCLA
Once again, Los Angeles demonstrates that it is a community on the cutting edge of political, social and cultural change. The April 13 elections provided us with a chance to consider how race relations is evolving through the prism of politics. Race and ethnicity played a role in the campaigns for the school board, City Council and community college board. They will continue to play a role, but in a much different way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1999 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even though Caltrans may have contributed to a deadly freeway accident in Anaheim in July, the victim's family faces an uphill battle if it sues the state, lawyers say. The reason: state law and some fine print in the permit Caltrans issued that allowed an oversized truck under a low overpass, causing an accident that killed a Westminster motorist. "There are almost insurmountable [obstacles] to a suit," said David Baer, a San Francisco lawyer who specializes in defending public agencies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2000 | ERIN TEXEIRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Where you going?" the cops asked the teenager lugging his schoolbooks along Vermont Avenue one afternoon last week. "What are you doing?" They pointed to his UC Berkeley cap and clothes, all blue--a color often favored by local gang members. And they said: "You look suspicious." They let him go with a warning, but later that day Wylie Jason Tidwell III, 17, became livid while telling the story to friends. "Suspicious? Me? Why, because I'm black?"
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