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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1987
Jody Powell, I'm gonna miss you. When you worked for the Carter Administration I was a little skeptical of you and your talents. But after reading your column regularly in The Times, I feel that I came to know you as a man of common sense, intelligence and, not least, a terrific sense of puckish humor. You may not have thought your role was to answer questions, write about speeches or analyze decisions, but you did an excellent job of it and your going is our loss. Good luck in your new endeavor with a public relations firm.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2009 | Associated Press
Jody Powell, who was White House press secretary and among the closest and most trusted advisors to President Carter, died Monday of a heart attack. He was 65. Powell, a member of the so-called Georgia Mafia that descended on Washington after Carter was elected president, was stricken at his home near Cambridge on Maryland's eastern shore, said Jack Nelson, a retired Los Angeles Times reporter and close friend of Powell. Nelson said Powell had been working with firewood with a helper who briefly stepped away.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2009 | Associated Press
Jody Powell, who was White House press secretary and among the closest and most trusted advisors to President Carter, died Monday of a heart attack. He was 65. Powell, a member of the so-called Georgia Mafia that descended on Washington after Carter was elected president, was stricken at his home near Cambridge on Maryland's eastern shore, said Jack Nelson, a retired Los Angeles Times reporter and close friend of Powell. Nelson said Powell had been working with firewood with a helper who briefly stepped away.
OPINION
January 26, 1992 | David Gergen, David R. Gergen, editor-at-large for U.S. News and World Report, served as communications director for the Reagan White House from 1981 to 1983
Hamilton Jordan (pronounced Jer'-den), now 47, and Jody Powell, 48, were the "gold-dust twins" at the heart of the last Democratic campaign that captured the White House. In the past 25 years, only their Southern strategy guided the Democrats to victory. And, like Bill Clinton--the governor of Arkansas the press had seemed to be electing before any votes has been cast--their candidate was a Southern centrist governor who came out of nowhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1986 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
Jody Powell, former press secretary to President Jimmy Carter, said Tuesday in Orange County that President Reagan was justified in bombing Libya, but that the wisdom of the military action remains to be seen. Powell, who is now a syndicated newspaper columnist, said in an interview at Chapman College: "I don't have any questions in my mind that we were justified in hitting Libya, particularly since . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1986 | Bill Billiter \f7
Jody Powell, former press secretary to President Jimmy Carter, will be among the featured speakers at Chapman College's "Media and Politics" forum April 22 to 24. Powell, now a syndicated columnist, will speak at 7:30 p.m. April 22 in the college's Memorial Hall Auditorium. His talk, as all events during the three-day forum, is free and open to the public. At 9 a.m. April 23, Powell will take part in a panel discussion of "Television and the U.S. Presidency" in the Griset dining room.
OPINION
January 26, 1992 | David Gergen, David R. Gergen, editor-at-large for U.S. News and World Report, served as communications director for the Reagan White House from 1981 to 1983
Hamilton Jordan (pronounced Jer'-den), now 47, and Jody Powell, 48, were the "gold-dust twins" at the heart of the last Democratic campaign that captured the White House. In the past 25 years, only their Southern strategy guided the Democrats to victory. And, like Bill Clinton--the governor of Arkansas the press had seemed to be electing before any votes has been cast--their candidate was a Southern centrist governor who came out of nowhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1986
I really get miffed by the verbal sword-rattling of petty people like columnist Jody Powell (Editorial Pages, Jan. 8). It surely must require great courage to sit in a secure office in Washington and write scurrilous articles about the timidity of President Reagan in not mounting an attack on Libya and Kadafi. If he would put his brain where his money-grubbing pen is, Powell would realize the enormity of what he is suggesting. The entire Arab community has gone on record that it would, in concert, support Libya against any such attack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1985
I believe that Jody Powell is wrong in his belief that a military draft would be a fairer system for minorities and the poor than the voluntary enlistment program. I refer to his column (Editorial Pages, May 6), "Back to the Draft: It's More Economical, and It's Right." I do agree that the volunteer military is not fair to minorities; because of economic conditions many minorities have few choices other than to join the military. But a draft has never been fair either, and does not provide a solution to the problem.
NEWS
January 23, 1985 | JENNINGS PARROTT
At the tender age of 10 weeks, Amanda Smidt is the product of a broken home. Her parents split up to keep their jobs. "We're paying a lot of money for baby sitters," Jeffrey Smidt said from his rented home in Oconomowoc in Waukesha County, Wis., 20 miles west of Milwaukee, where his wife, Cheryl, a licensed practical nurse, is sharing an apartment with a friend. Jeffrey Smidt, 28, is a deputy with the Waukesha County Sheriff's Department, and his job requires him to live in the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1987
Jody Powell, I'm gonna miss you. When you worked for the Carter Administration I was a little skeptical of you and your talents. But after reading your column regularly in The Times, I feel that I came to know you as a man of common sense, intelligence and, not least, a terrific sense of puckish humor. You may not have thought your role was to answer questions, write about speeches or analyze decisions, but you did an excellent job of it and your going is our loss. Good luck in your new endeavor with a public relations firm.
NEWS
May 4, 1986 | ELEANOR CLIFT, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, who is normally low-key in his public pronouncements and says he favors "quiet diplomacy," has been unusually outspoken during President Reagan's Asia trip. In Bali, Indonesia, he expressed outrage at Philippine Vice President Salvador Laurel's suggestion that there were "cobwebs of doubt" among the Philippine people about how solidly Reagan backs the government of President Corazon Aquino.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1986 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
Jody Powell, former press secretary to President Jimmy Carter, said Tuesday in Orange County that President Reagan was justified in bombing Libya, but that the wisdom of the military action remains to be seen. Powell, who is now a syndicated newspaper columnist, said in an interview at Chapman College: "I don't have any questions in my mind that we were justified in hitting Libya, particularly since . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1986 | Bill Billiter \f7
Jody Powell, former press secretary to President Jimmy Carter, will be among the featured speakers at Chapman College's "Media and Politics" forum April 22 to 24. Powell, now a syndicated columnist, will speak at 7:30 p.m. April 22 in the college's Memorial Hall Auditorium. His talk, as all events during the three-day forum, is free and open to the public. At 9 a.m. April 23, Powell will take part in a panel discussion of "Television and the U.S. Presidency" in the Griset dining room.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1986
I really get miffed by the verbal sword-rattling of petty people like columnist Jody Powell (Editorial Pages, Jan. 8). It surely must require great courage to sit in a secure office in Washington and write scurrilous articles about the timidity of President Reagan in not mounting an attack on Libya and Kadafi. If he would put his brain where his money-grubbing pen is, Powell would realize the enormity of what he is suggesting. The entire Arab community has gone on record that it would, in concert, support Libya against any such attack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1985
I believe that Jody Powell is wrong in his belief that a military draft would be a fairer system for minorities and the poor than the voluntary enlistment program. I refer to his column (Editorial Pages, May 6), "Back to the Draft: It's More Economical, and It's Right." I do agree that the volunteer military is not fair to minorities; because of economic conditions many minorities have few choices other than to join the military. But a draft has never been fair either, and does not provide a solution to the problem.
NEWS
May 4, 1986 | ELEANOR CLIFT, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, who is normally low-key in his public pronouncements and says he favors "quiet diplomacy," has been unusually outspoken during President Reagan's Asia trip. In Bali, Indonesia, he expressed outrage at Philippine Vice President Salvador Laurel's suggestion that there were "cobwebs of doubt" among the Philippine people about how solidly Reagan backs the government of President Corazon Aquino.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1993 | ROBERT STRAUSS, Robert Strauss is the television critic for the Asbury Park Press in New Jersey
Looking down from the wall to the right as Ken Burns sits at his desk in his converted-barn office is a fine, slightly sepia photo portrait of Jackie Robinson, the first black man to play major league baseball this century. Robinson sits in his Brooklyn Dodgers uniform with a bat on his shoulder, appearing at once serene and unflappable and, conversely, intense and passionate.
NEWS
January 23, 1985 | JENNINGS PARROTT
At the tender age of 10 weeks, Amanda Smidt is the product of a broken home. Her parents split up to keep their jobs. "We're paying a lot of money for baby sitters," Jeffrey Smidt said from his rented home in Oconomowoc in Waukesha County, Wis., 20 miles west of Milwaukee, where his wife, Cheryl, a licensed practical nurse, is sharing an apartment with a friend. Jeffrey Smidt, 28, is a deputy with the Waukesha County Sheriff's Department, and his job requires him to live in the county.
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