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Jody Watley

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1987 | DENNIS HUNT
Most dance albums are the dregs. All they have to offer is a good beat, without much imagination, creativity or continuity. One or two good cuts is normally the quality quota for a dance album. There are exceptions. Madonna's albums, invariably loaded with dance tunes, are first-rate. Janet Jackson set a new standard for dance music with "Control," the best dance album since Donna Summer's "Bad Girls" in 1979.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1996 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the name Jody Watley arises, the words "dance diva" often precede it. It's not hard to figure why. Watley got her start as a dancer on TV's "Soul Train" in the mid-'70s. In 1977, she began a seven-year stint as a singer in the commercially potent dance band Shalamar. By 1987, the vocalist was drawing Janet Jackson comparisons when her debut album spawned three Top 10 hits, all designed to inspire dance-floor fever.
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MAGAZINE
December 13, 1987 | STU BLACK, Stu Black is a Los Angeles writer.
SINGER JODY WATLEY is playing to her smallest assemblage in recent memory, a gang of three. She is speaking of wondrous ideas she has planned for larger audiences. "I want this next video to have a gritty, street feel," she says, looking around the office at MCA Records in Universal City. The wall is lined with gold and platinum plaques, symbols of the company's successes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1994 | CONNIE JOHNSON
** Jody Watley, "Intimacy," MCA. Watley's shortcomings as a singer don't generally detract from the appeal of her music. When she does some post-disco, punched-up jam, it's easy to appreciate her efforts on a Janet Jackson-esque, less-is-more level. While her songwriting is as sharp as ever and her songs have never sounded more personal, her singing has never sounded more bland.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1989 | CONNIE JOHNSON
When it comes to pretty packaging, Watley's got it all wrapped up. With her young-girl-in-love vocals given a protective, multilayered aural coating by producer Andre Cymone, the high-fashion singer holds her own with more exciting singers like Karyn White, Whitney Houston and Sheena Easton. Like other minimally gifted vocalists such as Pebbles and Janet Jackson, Watley excels in the area of sheer attitude and style. The smartest ploy on the album is the use of rappers Eric B. & Rakim, who add harsh, rugged heft to "Friends."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1994 | CONNIE JOHNSON
** Jody Watley, "Intimacy," MCA. Watley's shortcomings as a singer don't generally detract from the appeal of her music. When she does some post-disco, punched-up jam, it's easy to appreciate her efforts on a Janet Jackson-esque, less-is-more level. While her songwriting is as sharp as ever and her songs have never sounded more personal, her singing has never sounded more bland.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1992 | CONNIE JOHNSON
JODY WATLEY "Affairs of the Heart" MCA * * 1/2 Jody Watley is an old-school romantic who, for all her cutting-edge hipness, still believes in love of the "always and forever" variety. It's a recurring theme in most of her albums, including this one. She frequently sings from the stance of one doing all the committing in a relationship, and while that may be a relevant point to express, its appeal as subject matter is starting to wear thin. Watley sounds best when she begs a little less.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1987 | CONNIE JOHNSON
* * * "JODY WATLEY." Jody Watley. MCA. * * * "IN LOVE." Bunny DeBarge. Motown. As a founding member of Shalamar, Jody Watley played an integral role in the group's dance-oriented visuals and sunny, California black-pop sound. As a solo artist, Watley is still most comfortable with a straight-on, assertive groove, and this album's first single, "Looking For a New Love," expresses it best.
NEWS
November 16, 1990 | JEANNINE STEIN
The Scene: Party Wednesday night at the Four Seasons hotel to celebrate the release of Chrysalis Records' "Red, Hot and Blue," a double album of Cole Porter songs featuring U2, k.d. lang, Jody Watley, The Jungle Brothers, Sinead O'Connor, Neneh Cherry and many others. Next month, ABC will air a 90-minute special, including the stars performing their videos. This is more than an ambitious multimedia extravaganza: Proceeds from sales will benefit international AIDS research and relief programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1996 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the name Jody Watley arises, the words "dance diva" often precede it. It's not hard to figure why. Watley got her start as a dancer on TV's "Soul Train" in the mid-'70s. In 1977, she began a seven-year stint as a singer in the commercially potent dance band Shalamar. By 1987, the vocalist was drawing Janet Jackson comparisons when her debut album spawned three Top 10 hits, all designed to inspire dance-floor fever.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1992 | CONNIE JOHNSON
JODY WATLEY "Affairs of the Heart" MCA * * 1/2 Jody Watley is an old-school romantic who, for all her cutting-edge hipness, still believes in love of the "always and forever" variety. It's a recurring theme in most of her albums, including this one. She frequently sings from the stance of one doing all the committing in a relationship, and while that may be a relevant point to express, its appeal as subject matter is starting to wear thin. Watley sounds best when she begs a little less.
NEWS
November 16, 1990 | JEANNINE STEIN
The Scene: Party Wednesday night at the Four Seasons hotel to celebrate the release of Chrysalis Records' "Red, Hot and Blue," a double album of Cole Porter songs featuring U2, k.d. lang, Jody Watley, The Jungle Brothers, Sinead O'Connor, Neneh Cherry and many others. Next month, ABC will air a 90-minute special, including the stars performing their videos. This is more than an ambitious multimedia extravaganza: Proceeds from sales will benefit international AIDS research and relief programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT
Dance mix collections like this top-notch pair are a treat for hard-core fans after no-holds-barred dance music boasting drumbeats that resemble thunderclaps. On these greatest-dance-hits packages, mixmasters rework songs with the dance-music fan rather than the radio listener in mind, relying on a barrage of special effects, like scratching, to elevate the tracks to a new level.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1989 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Mostly through the avenue of music video, Jody Watley has already proven herself one of the most watchable women in pop--thanks not only to her model-like physique, cheekbones that won't quit and those lips/those eyes, but also to real singing and, especially, dancing talents. In her local headlining debut Saturday at the Wiltern Theatre, Watley showed that it's not just camera angles and editing techniques propping up her popularity: She's been as blessedly created for the concert stage as she was made-for-MTV.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1989 | CONNIE JOHNSON
When it comes to pretty packaging, Watley's got it all wrapped up. With her young-girl-in-love vocals given a protective, multilayered aural coating by producer Andre Cymone, the high-fashion singer holds her own with more exciting singers like Karyn White, Whitney Houston and Sheena Easton. Like other minimally gifted vocalists such as Pebbles and Janet Jackson, Watley excels in the area of sheer attitude and style. The smartest ploy on the album is the use of rappers Eric B. & Rakim, who add harsh, rugged heft to "Friends."
MAGAZINE
December 13, 1987 | STU BLACK, Stu Black is a Los Angeles writer.
SINGER JODY WATLEY is playing to her smallest assemblage in recent memory, a gang of three. She is speaking of wondrous ideas she has planned for larger audiences. "I want this next video to have a gritty, street feel," she says, looking around the office at MCA Records in Universal City. The wall is lined with gold and platinum plaques, symbols of the company's successes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1989 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Mostly through the avenue of music video, Jody Watley has already proven herself one of the most watchable women in pop--thanks not only to her model-like physique, cheekbones that won't quit and those lips/those eyes, but also to real singing and, especially, dancing talents. In her local headlining debut Saturday at the Wiltern Theatre, Watley showed that it's not just camera angles and editing techniques propping up her popularity: She's been as blessedly created for the concert stage as she was made-for-MTV.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT
Dance mix collections like this top-notch pair are a treat for hard-core fans after no-holds-barred dance music boasting drumbeats that resemble thunderclaps. On these greatest-dance-hits packages, mixmasters rework songs with the dance-music fan rather than the radio listener in mind, relying on a barrage of special effects, like scratching, to elevate the tracks to a new level.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1987 | DENNIS HUNT
Most dance albums are the dregs. All they have to offer is a good beat, without much imagination, creativity or continuity. One or two good cuts is normally the quality quota for a dance album. There are exceptions. Madonna's albums, invariably loaded with dance tunes, are first-rate. Janet Jackson set a new standard for dance music with "Control," the best dance album since Donna Summer's "Bad Girls" in 1979.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1987 | CONNIE JOHNSON
* * * "JODY WATLEY." Jody Watley. MCA. * * * "IN LOVE." Bunny DeBarge. Motown. As a founding member of Shalamar, Jody Watley played an integral role in the group's dance-oriented visuals and sunny, California black-pop sound. As a solo artist, Watley is still most comfortable with a straight-on, assertive groove, and this album's first single, "Looking For a New Love," expresses it best.
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