Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJody Williams
IN THE NEWS

Jody Williams

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1997
What an inspiration to see the Nobel Peace Prize awarded to Jody Williams and her International Campaign to Ban Landmines (Oct. 11). The humanity of this cause and the lack of ego and pretense with which Williams lives her purpose gave me pause. I agree with her assessment of President Clinton as "neither a leader nor a statesman" and applaud her shifting the media spotlight away from herself and onto obstacles and solutions. Her fearlessness in the face of government, stating her position with single-minded clarity and simplicity, speaks well for the victims she speaks for. Like Mother Teresa, also a Peace Prize recipient, she has served what each has called "the poorest of the poor."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Jody Williams, joint winner of the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize, said she will keep her $500,000 share of the prize money but that she plans to step down as head of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, the organization with which she shared the prize. Williams, 47, said she will use the money to fund her continued work with the organization and to write a book about the success of the campaign.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Jody Williams, joint winner of the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize, said she will keep her $500,000 share of the prize money but that she plans to step down as head of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, the organization with which she shared the prize. Williams, 47, said she will use the money to fund her continued work with the organization and to write a book about the success of the campaign.
NEWS
February 6, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's hard to imagine how the Nobel Peace Prize could bring so much grief. Nearly four months after winning the 1997 prize, the global campaign to rid the world of land mines is still reeling from the impact, torn by ego clashes and disagreements, including a fight over control of the award money.
NEWS
October 11, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded Friday to American activist Jody Williams and the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, which she guided through a six-year effort that has produced an agreement by more than half the world's nations--but not the United States--to outlaw the insidious explosives. Awakened at 5 a.m. by a Norwegian television station that told her the news, Williams said that she hoped the prize would change President Clinton's decision to withhold U.S.
NEWS
October 11, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For once, Jody Williams was not already out of bed and working at her computer when the phone rang shortly before 5 a.m. Friday. On a normal day, she would have been at work for at least an hour, sending appeals via computer to government offices from Mozambique to Moscow or e-mail instructions to allies in her international coalition to ban land mines. The call from a Norwegian journalist was how she learned that she and the anti-land mine group she heads had won the Nobel Peace Prize.
NEWS
February 6, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's hard to imagine how the Nobel Peace Prize could bring so much grief. Nearly four months after winning the 1997 prize, the global campaign to rid the world of land mines is still reeling from the impact, torn by ego clashes and disagreements, including a fight over control of the award money.
NEWS
October 16, 1997 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a long, exhilarating weekend: turning 47 years old, riding her horse Frank, keeping track of the beaver's construction on the pond and winning the Nobel Peace Prize. Exhaustion was taking its toll. "I'm Jody," she announced, "and I'm not getting up." But moments later, the first American to win the peace prize since Elie Wiesel in 1986 did arise from the cozy love seat where she had all but collapsed beneath a rose-colored blanket.
NEWS
March 27, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two Nobel Peace Prize winners and Vietnam War activist Daniel Ellsberg were among 65 people arrested near the White House in antiwar protests. The protesters climbed over police barricades closing off Lafayette Park, across Pennsylvania Avenue from the White House, and sang and prayed until they were taken into custody.
NEWS
December 11, 1997 | Associated Press
American Jody Williams accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on Wednesday for her worldwide campaign to ban land mines, saying the signing of an international land mine treaty last week in Ottawa has been her "real prize." Williams, of Putney, Vt.--who shared the honor and $1-million prize with the International Campaign to Ban Landmines--was instrumental in bringing about the pact outlawing land mines, which has been signed by 125 countries. (The United States refused to sign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1997
What an inspiration to see the Nobel Peace Prize awarded to Jody Williams and her International Campaign to Ban Landmines (Oct. 11). The humanity of this cause and the lack of ego and pretense with which Williams lives her purpose gave me pause. I agree with her assessment of President Clinton as "neither a leader nor a statesman" and applaud her shifting the media spotlight away from herself and onto obstacles and solutions. Her fearlessness in the face of government, stating her position with single-minded clarity and simplicity, speaks well for the victims she speaks for. Like Mother Teresa, also a Peace Prize recipient, she has served what each has called "the poorest of the poor."
NEWS
October 16, 1997 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a long, exhilarating weekend: turning 47 years old, riding her horse Frank, keeping track of the beaver's construction on the pond and winning the Nobel Peace Prize. Exhaustion was taking its toll. "I'm Jody," she announced, "and I'm not getting up." But moments later, the first American to win the peace prize since Elie Wiesel in 1986 did arise from the cozy love seat where she had all but collapsed beneath a rose-colored blanket.
NEWS
October 11, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded Friday to American activist Jody Williams and the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, which she guided through a six-year effort that has produced an agreement by more than half the world's nations--but not the United States--to outlaw the insidious explosives. Awakened at 5 a.m. by a Norwegian television station that told her the news, Williams said that she hoped the prize would change President Clinton's decision to withhold U.S.
NEWS
October 11, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For once, Jody Williams was not already out of bed and working at her computer when the phone rang shortly before 5 a.m. Friday. On a normal day, she would have been at work for at least an hour, sending appeals via computer to government offices from Mozambique to Moscow or e-mail instructions to allies in her international coalition to ban land mines. The call from a Norwegian journalist was how she learned that she and the anti-land mine group she heads had won the Nobel Peace Prize.
NEWS
October 28, 1997
Jody Williams is honest and speaks her mind ("A Nobel Cause," Oct. 16). She is right about President Clinton being a coward for not signing the treaty to ban land mines. It is not true that American-used land mines do not kill or maim. What about the ones left in Vietnam and Laos? As a world leader and a country that is supposed to care about peace and human rights, the United States should be leading this ban. Instead, we have allied ourselves with China, a nation often criticized by our national leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1989
I'd like to comment on a statement that was attributed to Jody Williams in the Times on Aug. 11. If she was quoted correctly, the statement we take exception to is, "There's asparagus wasting on the Irvine Ranch." This is simply not true. Treasure Farms, the Irvine Co.'s lessee on the land, achieved its largest per-acre yield of asparagus in the company's history this past season (January to May). What she might be referring to regarding the asparagus is the current condition of the fern growth.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|