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Joe Bauman

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joe Bauman, 83, whose 72 minor-league home runs in 1954 stood as a professional baseball record until Barry Bonds hit 73 in 2001, died Tuesday in Roswell, N.M., where he played for the Roswell Rockets of the Longhorn League during the 1950s. He succumbed to pneumonia, a complication from an Aug. 11 fall during a ceremony to rename the old Fair Park as Joe Bauman Stadium. He broke his pelvis in the fall and remained hospitalized until his death.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joe Bauman, 83, whose 72 minor-league home runs in 1954 stood as a professional baseball record until Barry Bonds hit 73 in 2001, died Tuesday in Roswell, N.M., where he played for the Roswell Rockets of the Longhorn League during the 1950s. He succumbed to pneumonia, a complication from an Aug. 11 fall during a ceremony to rename the old Fair Park as Joe Bauman Stadium. He broke his pelvis in the fall and remained hospitalized until his death.
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SPORTS
September 4, 1998 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wind was blowing out that Sunday afternoon in 1954, and the pitcher was Jose Gallardo, a Cuban who threw a fastball on a 1-and-2 count. It was met by a 35-inch, 34-ounce Vern Stephens-model bat, swung left-handed and with an uppercut. The stick moved a little faster through the strike zone since Joe Bauman had seen the doctor back in Roswell, N.M., a few days before and gotten some help in dealing with the dog days of August and early September.
SPORTS
September 4, 1998 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wind was blowing out that Sunday afternoon in 1954, and the pitcher was Jose Gallardo, a Cuban who threw a fastball on a 1-and-2 count. It was met by a 35-inch, 34-ounce Vern Stephens-model bat, swung left-handed and with an uppercut. The stick moved a little faster through the strike zone since Joe Bauman had seen the doctor back in Roswell, N.M., a few days before and gotten some help in dealing with the dog days of August and early September.
SPORTS
November 9, 1995 | MAL FLORENCE
Roger Maris hit 61 home runs in 1961, still a major league record. But it isn't the single-season professional record. Joe Bauman established that in 1954 while playing for the Roswell, N.M., Rockets in the Class-C Longhorn League. He hit 72 home runs. Bauman, 73, said that he supplemented his minor league salary with what he called "fence" money. After each homer, fans would rush the backstop and stick $1 and $5 bills through the fence for the hitter to collect.
SPORTS
September 6, 1989
Coaching by committee: Portland State, desperately trying to generate fan interest, let its crowd make some crucial decisions in Saturday's 35-21 victory over Cameron of Lawton, Okla. Portland State Coach Pokey Allen allowed the fans at Civic Stadium to engineer a two-play, 20-yard scoring drive. Those seated behind the Portland bench were given cards with the word run in red on one side and pass in green on the other.
SPORTS
September 13, 1998 | RONALD BLUM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Almost unnoticed in the home run chase was baseball's announcement that minority employment rose 3 percent from 1995 to 1997. Of 5,008 employees in major league baseball's central offices and the 30 teams at the end of last year, 1,141 (23 percent) were minorities, up from 20 percent in the previous survey, which took place after the 1994-95 strike. The percentage of women rose from 21 to 23 percent.
SPORTS
August 11, 2001 | Earl Gustkey
Can sportswriters really be trusted with voting for football and baseball hall of fame candidates? Sportswriter Norman Chad doesn't think so. Writing for AOL, he pointed out recently that in 1936, for the first baseball Hall of Fame induction class, 11 of 226 voters didn't vote for Babe Ruth. Four of the 226 didn't vote for Ty Cobb. He found 20 of 302 voters in 1966 left a blank next to Ted Williams' name. And in 1979, 23 of 432 didn't vote for Willie Mays.
NEWS
December 12, 1996 | From Christian Science Monitor
Growing up in New Jersey, Jerry Cohen was a big baseball fan, only not in the usual way. What fascinated him were uniform designs, not statistics or even the players who compiled them. "My baseball card collection isn't worth anything because I only cared about the uniform photographs," Cohen says. "I didn't care about whether it was Mickey Mantle or some third-rate player." Cohen's eccentricities as a fan have paid off.
SPORTS
October 5, 1997 | JIM MURRAY
You can't help but feel a grudging admiration for Seattle slugger Ken Griffey Jr. for benching himself in the last days of the divisional race to conserve his energies for the playoffs, sacrificing in the process all chance to catch up to the Babe Ruth-Roger Maris 60-61 homer totals. On the other hand, it doesn't appear to have done him or his team much good. Besides, he was trifling with the single most glamorous sports record of all. Only a 57 by a golfer in a U.S. Open could match it.
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