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Joe Berlinger

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1993 | KRISTINE MCKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"People come to our film expecting some kind of true crime story but that's not what we were attempting to do," said 30-year-old filmmaker Joe Berlinger of the award-winning documentary "Brother's Keeper."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic, This post has been updated. See note below.
There's a story former U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry "Hank" Paulson tells in Joe Berlinger's unsettling new documentary, "Hank: 5 Years From the Brink," about "Goodnight Moon. " His wife, Wendy, suggested that instead of the insistent monotone we grew accustomed to in 2008 as he explained the trillion-dollar Wall Street bailout to Congress, he should read the bedtime story to his children with more emotion in his voice. When he did, they burst into tears - demanding that he read like Daddy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic, This post has been updated. See note below.
There's a story former U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry "Hank" Paulson tells in Joe Berlinger's unsettling new documentary, "Hank: 5 Years From the Brink," about "Goodnight Moon. " His wife, Wendy, suggested that instead of the insistent monotone we grew accustomed to in 2008 as he explained the trillion-dollar Wall Street bailout to Congress, he should read the bedtime story to his children with more emotion in his voice. When he did, they burst into tears - demanding that he read like Daddy.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
It was after a late screening and the group of several hundred was aggrieved, its moral hackles raised. "How could they treat him so badly?" one audience member asked. "An injustice," said another. "What can people do with their frustrations?" asked a third. The setting was neither a courtroom nor an activist meeting. It was at the Sundance Film Festival, and the assembled had just watched "The Internet's Own Boy," Brian Knappenberger's quietly evocative look at wunderkind hacker Aaron Swartz, whom the film suggests was driven to suicide in 2013 by a zealous federal prosecutor in Massachusetts.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
It was after a late screening and the group of several hundred was aggrieved, its moral hackles raised. "How could they treat him so badly?" one audience member asked. "An injustice," said another. "What can people do with their frustrations?" asked a third. The setting was neither a courtroom nor an activist meeting. It was at the Sundance Film Festival, and the assembled had just watched "The Internet's Own Boy," Brian Knappenberger's quietly evocative look at wunderkind hacker Aaron Swartz, whom the film suggests was driven to suicide in 2013 by a zealous federal prosecutor in Massachusetts.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling and Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
A new requirement that documentary films must be reviewed by the Los Angeles Times or New York Times in order to be eligible for Oscar consideration is being touted by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences as a way to pare down a recent glut in the number of feature films submitted — including many that air on television but may only play in one theater for one week. But the change, which would come into effect for the 2013 Oscars, is raising concerns among some filmmakers, including members of the academy's own documentary branch, that the new rule will favor wealthier documentary makers who have professional publicists over the vast majority of colleagues who typically struggle to finance their films, let alone publicize them.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2010 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
In one of Hollywood's most gripping legal thrillers, Chevron Corp. is trying to obtain 600 hours of outtakes from a documentary film focused on oil industry environmental practices in Ecuador, sparking a court battle that has attracted the attention of 1st Amendment lawyers, top filmmakers, show business unions and a corporation that says it was defamed in another nonfiction film. For 17 years, the San Ramon, Calif.-based energy giant has fought a class-action lawsuit in Ecuador that could cost it up to $27 billion in damages and cleanup costs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2009 | Gary Goldstein
For director Joe Berlinger, the painstaking road to making the powerful documentary "Crude," all started with what he dubs his "toxi-tour" of a contaminated swath of Ecuador's Amazonian rain forest. After massive oil exploration that began in the mid-1960s by Texaco (in a consortium formed with Gulf), the area -- approximately the size of Rhode Island -- is now home to some of the world's most heinous environmental destruction. Four years ago, Berlinger traveled to Ecuador to view the destruction at the urging of acquaintance Steven Donziger, a Manhattan-based attorney and consultant to the legal team representing 30,000 native Ecuadorians embroiled, since 1993, in a protracted class-action lawsuit against Texaco and, later, Chevron, which acquired Texaco in 2001.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2010 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
A federal appeals panel has ruled quickly that though Joe Berlinger does not have to surrender all 600 hours of outtakes from his film "Crude" to Chevron Corp., the documentary filmmaker must immediately hand over several categories of unused film footage. In an order issued Thursday, a day after the closely watched 1st Amendment case was argued in New York, the three-judge panel said that Berlinger must turn over outtakes related to three issues covered in his 2009 film about environmental litigation in Ecuador.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2009
Before seeing the late fall blockbusters, spare some time for an excellent documentary that has surfaced for a return engagement. "Crude" sounds like the standard "This is an outrage" environmental degradation epic, but it is something more interesting as well. The news behind the news about a lawsuit pitting 30,000 Ecuadoreans against Chevron, "Crude" shows in candid detail how campaigns are waged, tactics decided on and strategies prioritized. For both sides realize that lawsuits like this one are not won or lost in the courtroom alone but in the critical realm of perception and public opinion.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling and Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
A new requirement that documentary films must be reviewed by the Los Angeles Times or New York Times in order to be eligible for Oscar consideration is being touted by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences as a way to pare down a recent glut in the number of feature films submitted — including many that air on television but may only play in one theater for one week. But the change, which would come into effect for the 2013 Oscars, is raising concerns among some filmmakers, including members of the academy's own documentary branch, that the new rule will favor wealthier documentary makers who have professional publicists over the vast majority of colleagues who typically struggle to finance their films, let alone publicize them.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2010 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
A federal appeals panel has ruled quickly that though Joe Berlinger does not have to surrender all 600 hours of outtakes from his film "Crude" to Chevron Corp., the documentary filmmaker must immediately hand over several categories of unused film footage. In an order issued Thursday, a day after the closely watched 1st Amendment case was argued in New York, the three-judge panel said that Berlinger must turn over outtakes related to three issues covered in his 2009 film about environmental litigation in Ecuador.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2010 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
In one of Hollywood's most gripping legal thrillers, Chevron Corp. is trying to obtain 600 hours of outtakes from a documentary film focused on oil industry environmental practices in Ecuador, sparking a court battle that has attracted the attention of 1st Amendment lawyers, top filmmakers, show business unions and a corporation that says it was defamed in another nonfiction film. For 17 years, the San Ramon, Calif.-based energy giant has fought a class-action lawsuit in Ecuador that could cost it up to $27 billion in damages and cleanup costs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2009 | Gary Goldstein
For director Joe Berlinger, the painstaking road to making the powerful documentary "Crude," all started with what he dubs his "toxi-tour" of a contaminated swath of Ecuador's Amazonian rain forest. After massive oil exploration that began in the mid-1960s by Texaco (in a consortium formed with Gulf), the area -- approximately the size of Rhode Island -- is now home to some of the world's most heinous environmental destruction. Four years ago, Berlinger traveled to Ecuador to view the destruction at the urging of acquaintance Steven Donziger, a Manhattan-based attorney and consultant to the legal team representing 30,000 native Ecuadorians embroiled, since 1993, in a protracted class-action lawsuit against Texaco and, later, Chevron, which acquired Texaco in 2001.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1993 | KRISTINE MCKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"People come to our film expecting some kind of true crime story but that's not what we were attempting to do," said 30-year-old filmmaker Joe Berlinger of the award-winning documentary "Brother's Keeper."
NEWS
January 26, 1997 | Peter Rainer
On June 6, 1990, Bill Ward, an ailing dairy farmer from the central New York hamlet of Munnsville, was found dead in the bed he shared with his 59-year-old younger brother Delbert. What at first seemed like a case of death from natural causes soon became complicated. A confession by Delbert to the state police that he had suffocated Bill was later denied by him and his other sibling Lyman (pictured); he claimed police coerced him.
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