Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJoe Black
IN THE NEWS

Joe Black

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2002
Joe Black, the Brooklyn Dodger who became the first black pitcher to win a World Series game, has died. He was 78. (Obituary, and an appreciation by Roger Kahn, in Sports.)
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
May 9, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
We recently asked you to list your choices for the 10 greatest Dodgers of all time, and vote you did, as we received an amazing 12,231 ballots. So many people voted that we have decided to expand the list from the top 10 to the top 20. Each weekday at 11 a.m. PDT, a new person will be listed as we count down all 20. Remember, any Dodger, Brooklyn or L.A., was eligible, including managers, owners, announcers, etc. Points were assigned based on where you listed the person on the ballot.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Adam Sandler's "The Waterboy" played like a pro in its second weekend, easily outrunning two new competitors: the teen thriller "I Still Know What You Did Last Summer" and the Brad Pitt romance "Meet Joe Black." After breaking all non-summer records last weekend, "Waterboy" tenaciously held on, losing only 36% from its first weekend for an estimated $25.2 million on 2,675 screens.
SPORTS
May 25, 2002
Roger Kahn's story about pitcher Joe Black [May 18] was superb. It was centered upon the man and his belief in the quality of being an American, not just an African American. His quotes referring to the proper use of the English language--as opposed to what some regard as the way it is acceptable to speak in order to be thought of as "cool"--hit the center of the strike zone, right down the pike. Those who cherish baseball, who cherish gentlemen, who cherish the quality of character regardless of race or ethnicity, will cherish the memory of Joe Black.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Death takes a holiday in "Meet Joe Black," but does that mean everyone else has to slow down? The fanciful story of what happens when the original Big Chill takes human form and investigates life on Earth, "Meet Joe Black" is more convinced of its worth than we are. Clocking in at a self-important two hours and 59 minutes, this elongated romantic fable is impossible to sustain at a running time better suited to the fall of the Roman empire.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite a hip marketing campaign, director Gus Van Sant's remake of Alfred Hitchcock's classic 1960 thriller, "Psycho," provoked only moderate interest from 1998 audiences. Arriving during the first week of the short pre-Christmas lull, "Psycho" managed only an estimated $10.5 million on 2,477 screens. The film was a runner-up to "A Bug's Life" in this week's box office derby.
SPORTS
May 18, 2002 | ROGER KAHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
We were riding a slow train, somewhere between Mobile and Montgomery, in the old racist South, "the Hookworm Belt," as the great sports editor Stanley Woodward described it. Joe Black was a 28-year-old Dodger rookie, who would have been a big leaguer years before, except for his color. Now he was telling me stories about life in the Negro Leagues, using a kind of "Amos 'n' Andy" drawl. After a while he said, "You're with a big paper. Does the manager tell you if he's gonna keep me?"
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1998 | LAURENCE B. CHOLLET, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In one sense, you could say Brad Pitt landed the role of a lifetime in "Meet Joe Black." He got a chance to play Death. "Listen, when it came to playing Death, it was a little bit of a mystery to me, still is," Pitt said with a sly laugh from the set of the film, which opens Friday. "I mean, how do you 'play' Death? You can't do any research, can you?" Keeping Death real was just one challenge director Martin Brest faced in bringing "Joe Black" to life.
SPORTS
September 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
The 1992 All-Star game will be played at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium, National League President Bill White said Thursday after a meeting of baseball's executive council in Milwaukee. San Diego, which last played host to the All-Star game in 1978, beat out Houston, Montreal and Philadelphia. San Diego business and community leaders made a presentation last June in Kansas City, Mo.
SPORTS
May 18, 2002 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Black, a one-year sensation for the Dodgers who in 1952 became the first black pitcher to win a World Series game, died Friday of prostate cancer. He was 78. Black, whose health had deteriorated the last few months, died at the Life Care Center of Scottsdale, Ariz. "Joe and I played together and we were very close friends," said Tom Lasorda, Dodger senior vice president. "He was a tremendous guy and he loved the Dodgers.
SPORTS
May 18, 2002 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Black, a one-year sensation for the Dodgers who in 1952 became the first black pitcher to win a World Series game, died Friday of prostate cancer. He was 78. Black, whose health had deteriorated the last few months, died at the Life Care Center of Scottsdale, Ariz. "Joe and I played together and we were very close friends," said Tom Lasorda, Dodger senior vice president. "He was a tremendous guy and he loved the Dodgers.
SPORTS
May 18, 2002 | ROGER KAHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
We were riding a slow train, somewhere between Mobile and Montgomery, in the old racist South, "the Hookworm Belt," as the great sports editor Stanley Woodward described it. Joe Black was a 28-year-old Dodger rookie, who would have been a big leaguer years before, except for his color. Now he was telling me stories about life in the Negro Leagues, using a kind of "Amos 'n' Andy" drawl. After a while he said, "You're with a big paper. Does the manager tell you if he's gonna keep me?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2002
Joe Black, the Brooklyn Dodger who became the first black pitcher to win a World Series game, has died. He was 78. (Obituary, and an appreciation by Roger Kahn, in Sports.)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite a hip marketing campaign, director Gus Van Sant's remake of Alfred Hitchcock's classic 1960 thriller, "Psycho," provoked only moderate interest from 1998 audiences. Arriving during the first week of the short pre-Christmas lull, "Psycho" managed only an estimated $10.5 million on 2,477 screens. The film was a runner-up to "A Bug's Life" in this week's box office derby.
MAGAZINE
November 29, 1998
Styled by Michael Eisenhower/Cloutier; makeup: Lisa Storey/Art Department, New York City; fashion assistant: Michael Cioffoletti
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1998
I strongly disagree with Kenneth Turan's review of "Meet Joe Black" ("Dead Man Goes a-Courtin,' " Nov. 13). I am so glad I didn't read the review before I saw the movie because I might have missed a terrific movie experience. I am an avid movie buff and fan and see many movies. I consider this one of the best movies I have seen this year. It far exceeded my expectations. It was humorous, warm, insightful, charming, magical and thoroughly entertaining. PATRICIA G. CONNELLY Bellflower "Meet Joe Black" is about awakening and savoring.
SPORTS
May 9, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
We recently asked you to list your choices for the 10 greatest Dodgers of all time, and vote you did, as we received an amazing 12,231 ballots. So many people voted that we have decided to expand the list from the top 10 to the top 20. Each weekday at 11 a.m. PDT, a new person will be listed as we count down all 20. Remember, any Dodger, Brooklyn or L.A., was eligible, including managers, owners, announcers, etc. Points were assigned based on where you listed the person on the ballot.
SPORTS
May 25, 2002
Roger Kahn's story about pitcher Joe Black [May 18] was superb. It was centered upon the man and his belief in the quality of being an American, not just an African American. His quotes referring to the proper use of the English language--as opposed to what some regard as the way it is acceptable to speak in order to be thought of as "cool"--hit the center of the strike zone, right down the pike. Those who cherish baseball, who cherish gentlemen, who cherish the quality of character regardless of race or ethnicity, will cherish the memory of Joe Black.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1998
Based on its opening weekend, Universal's "Meet Joe Black" will be in the red. Even Brad Pitt's overseas drawing power may not be enough for the $90-million film to turn a profit. The low-cost "I Still Know What You Did Last Summer" has teen appeal and strong video potential, signaling a decent profit for Sony.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Adam Sandler's "The Waterboy" played like a pro in its second weekend, easily outrunning two new competitors: the teen thriller "I Still Know What You Did Last Summer" and the Brad Pitt romance "Meet Joe Black." After breaking all non-summer records last weekend, "Waterboy" tenaciously held on, losing only 36% from its first weekend for an estimated $25.2 million on 2,675 screens.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|