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Joe Bosco

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1998 | BILL BOYARSKY
Trouble follows Joe Bosco around like an old hunting dog. I've never known anyone with troubles quite like those that have afflicted Bosco, an author I met when we were both covering the O.J. Simpson trial. There were the physical afflictions--a dislocated shoulder suffered in an after-hours bar fight over the Simpson case and the broken neck he suffered when he dove into the shallow end of a swimming pool during a Fourth of July party. Added to these were Bosco's legal troubles.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1998 | BILL BOYARSKY
Trouble follows Joe Bosco around like an old hunting dog. I've never known anyone with troubles quite like those that have afflicted Bosco, an author I met when we were both covering the O.J. Simpson trial. There were the physical afflictions--a dislocated shoulder suffered in an after-hours bar fight over the Simpson case and the broken neck he suffered when he dove into the shallow end of a swimming pool during a Fourth of July party. Added to these were Bosco's legal troubles.
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NEWS
August 1, 1995 | BILL BOYARSKY
The O.J. Simpson trial hasn't been easy for author Joe Bosco, who is writing a book on the case. First Bosco dislocated his shoulder in an after-hours bar fight with a man who disagreed with his view of the investigation and trial. Recently, he broke his neck diving into the shallow end of a swimming pool. On Monday, his head and neck immobilized by a brace and pain shooting up and down his arm, Bosco was hit by more trouble. Defense attorney Robert L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2010 | Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
Joseph Bosco, a freelance crime writer who secured one of the few permanent seats at the O.J. Simpson criminal trial and turned his observations into a nonfiction book about the murder case, has died. He was 61. Bosco died of natural causes July 8 in Beijing, where he had been living and working for the last several years, according to his son, Joe Bosco. He had been in poor health, his son said. "A Problem of Evidence: How the Prosecution Freed O.J. Simpson" (William Morrow) was Bosco's account of the 1995 trial of the former football star accused of murdering his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend, Ron Goldman.
SPORTS
April 4, 2004 | From Associated Press
Left-hander Al Leiter of the New York Mets was hit in the head by a line drive Saturday and might have to skip his first start of the season. Leiter grabbed the side of his face after getting hit by Alex Gonzalez's liner in the second inning of the Mets' 21-13 exhibition victory over the Florida Marlins in Jupiter, Fla. He fell on the mound, but never lost consciousness. After being treated by trainers, he stood up on his own and walked to a nearby golf cart that took him to the clubhouse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL
First it was a former Miss USA. Now another woman is telling tales of alleged sexual high jinks by members of Brunei's royal family. The latest stories center on Princess Jefridah Mohn Luis. The tale-teller is her former bodyguard, Lorrie L. McCready, who is alleging sexual harassment and wrongful termination in a lawsuit in Santa Monica Superior Court.
NEWS
April 22, 1995 | BILL BOYARSKY
Let history judge when the "trial of the century" went wrong. Maybe it was even before the trial began--perhaps at the moment last June when Los Angeles Police Cmdr. David Gascon went on national television to announce that the cops had managed to lose the era's most famous murder suspect, O.J. Simpson. Maybe it was when Judge Lance A. Ito tiptoed around prospective jurors during voir dire, treating them with such deference that they evolved into a jury of spoiled brats.
NEWS
August 10, 1995 | BILL BOYARSKY
"I was as scared as I've ever been in my life," author Joe Bosco told the E! television network's Kathleen Sullivan. Then in his Southern way Bosco added a heartfelt, "Yes, ma'am!" Bosco's relief was understandable. He had narrowly avoided the threat of being locked up in the inhospitable confines of the Los Angeles County Jail. Judge Lance A. Ito spared both Bosco and KNBC-TV's Tracie Savage that miserable fate when he ruled that they didn't have to reveal their sources for a story on the O.J.
NEWS
May 6, 1995 | BILL BOYARSKY
There's not a bad seat in Judge Lance A. Ito's little theater of criminal justice. But when the judge shifted reporters' seating around Friday, you'd think some of them had been consigned to the last row of the Forum. It was the first time the judge had rearranged press seating since the O.J. Simpson murder trial began three months ago. Some journalists moved forward, and others toward the rear of a courtroom that has only four rows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1998 | ANN W. O'NEILL
Round 2 for Alec Baldwin . . . A tragic test case . . . Name dropping . . . Ex Files update. Are you ready to rumble? In one corner we have actor Alec Baldwin, star of various action films. In the other, paparazzo Alan Zanger, nemesis of various stars. The two will soon return to a courtroom in Van Nuys to duke it out again, this time at a trial of civil lawsuits they've filed against each other. Jury selection begins June 29, according to Baldwin's lawyer, Philip D. Weiss.
NEWS
August 2, 1995 | BILL BOYARSKY
Rooting out the source of an unauthorized leak is a frustrating business, as O.J. Simpson defense attorney Peter Neufeld learned Tuesday. In an effort to find out the source of leaks of confidential blood test results, Neufeld put Michele Kestler, head of the Los Angeles Police Department crime lab, on the witness stand. Neufeld bored in on Kestler, a calm, composed woman with the look of a strong boss who knows everything going on in her laboratory.
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