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Joe Camel

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HEALTH
June 1, 1998 | MARTIN MILLER
How many miles would you walk for a Camel? Well, how about how many pages would you read? If you've got the appetite, you can check out more than 2,000 pages of once-secret internal documents from the brains behind Joe Camel--R.J. Reynolds. Before a landmark lawsuit forced the company to do otherwise, the tobacco giant used Joe Camel to attract youths to smoking. Anyone can now view the marketing documents on the World Wide Web. UC San Francisco has posted them at http://www.library.ucsf.
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OPINION
October 24, 2013
Re "Blow out the Camels," Opinion, Oct. 20 The centennial of Camel cigarettes in this country is no cause for celebration. Tobacco's grim toll on its consumers' health remains predictably costly, as professor Robert N. Proctor poignantly relates in his Op-Ed article. Yet the cigarette-selling business model remains viable, as the stock of the company that makes Camels has trended upward over the last few years. That's because the tobacco industry externalizes the long-term costs of its products' use. Most of the expenses caused by the deterioration of smokers' health are borne by society and not by the tobacco companies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1998 | SHAWN HUBLER
So you're in your car, listening to the radio, which is tuned to the Dodger station because you're a big baseball fan. And your little kid is with you, blissing out on the whole, G-rated, parent-kid-baseball-radio-experience, when all of a sudden, the announcer turns PG-13: Hey, kids! Here's your chance to win some cool new gear and tickets to a Dodger game! Just tell us in 30 words or less why smoking SUCKS!! Well, um, good message, but--did they have to say it quite that way?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
After the coffee. Before becoming way overexposed.  The Skinny: I'm on a standup comedy kick right now, with Maria Bamford's new album playing on Spotify as I write this. Friday's headlines include box offices previews and the return of cigarette commercials to the airwaves. Just kidding, they're eCigs. Joe is back next week, folks.  Daily Dose: ESPN, Twitter and Verizon wireless are teaming up to bring even more college football to social media by embedding highlight videos into tweets from the sports broadcasters' college football accounts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1997 | CARLOS V. LOZANO
As part of a larger legal campaign against the tobacco industry, Ventura County supervisors agreed this week to join other counties in a lawsuit against the R.J. Reynolds firm over its Joe Camel advertisements. The supervisors voted Tuesday to join a lawsuit brought by San Francisco resident Janet C. Mangini against the cigarette maker, alleging that the Joe Camel cartoon character featured in its ads is used to encourage minors to illegally purchase cigarettes.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1994 | Associated Press
Across the country, Joe Camel is apparently bursting through billboards advertising his biggest rival, the Marlboro Man. Joe Camel peers over an image of a cowboy on horseback and holds out a pack of Camel Lights. The tag line reads: "Genuine Taste, Never Boring." R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. thought the time was right to go after Marlboro smokers, said Peggy Carter, a spokeswoman. At the end of the fiscal second quarter, Marlboro had 28.8% of the estimated $48-billion U.S. cigarette market.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1998 | From Reuters
Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission said Monday they would seek to dismiss the government's case against R.J. Reynolds Tobacco over its Joe Camel advertising campaign, after tobacco companies reached a landmark $206-billion settlement with 46 states.
NEWS
May 1, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY
Newt Gingrich has had a lot to say lately. (They don't call him speaker for nothing.) And the president of the United States didn't really care to respond to most of it Thursday at his first formal news conference of 1998, at one point saying, "I'm not responsible for the speaker's behavior." However. . . . "I will tell you this," Bill Clinton added.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1997
If the Federal Trade Commission has its way, Joe Camel will soon be as extinct as the dinosaur and the dodo. And future generations will be grateful. Reversing a decision it made in 1994, the FTC now charges that R.J. Reynolds, the maker of Camel cigarettes, has used the Joe Camel character in advertising that deliberately targets children.
NEWS
October 9, 1998 | From Associated Press
The number of American youths taking up smoking as a daily habit jumped 73% between Joe Camel's debut in 1988 and 1996, the federal government said Thursday. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said tobacco ads that rely heavily on giveaways and kid-friendly cartoons are partly to blame. More than 1.2 million Americans younger than 18 started smoking daily in 1996, up from 708,000 in 1988, the CDC estimated. The rate at which teens started smoking also increased, climbing 50%.
NEWS
November 7, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
A federal judge has put a temporary block on new graphic warning labels for cigarette packages as a case concerning the constitutionality of requiring the labels proceeds. The new labels, which would cover the top half of a cigarette box and include the number to a smoking-cessation hotline, marked the first dramatic anti-smoking move made since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration was given new powers to regulate tobacco products, as health writer Melissa Healy has explained . Among other graphic images, the labels show a man blowing smoke out of a tracheotomy hole in his neck, a pair of diseased lungs and a dead man with autopsy staples in his chest.
HEALTH
March 20, 2010
If you think teenagers today are less susceptible to smoking advertisements than those of yesterday — remember all those Virginia Slims "You've come a long way, baby" ads? — you'd be sadly mistaken. A study published March 15 in the journal Pediatrics shows that the 2007 R.J. Reynolds' cigarette campaign for Camel No. 9 had a significant effect on teen girls. Researchers at UC San Diego and the American Legacy Foundation enrolled more than 1,000 children, ages 10 to 13, in a study in 2003 and followed them through 2008, asking them about their favorite cigarette advertisement.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2005 | From Reuters
A top R.J. Reynolds Tobacco executive Thursday defended the company's advertising policies, testifying during the U.S. racketeering trial against cigarette makers that R.J. Reynolds did not aim its popular Camel brand products at children or teenagers. Lynn Beasley, president and chief operating officer for the main unit of Reynolds American Inc., helped launch Joe Camel, the cartoon figure known for his cool persona and dark sunglasses that later drew the ire of regulators.
HEALTH
December 7, 1998
In response to Kathy Smith's column of Nov. 23 ("Unhealthy Choices Are Better Than No Choice"): The underlying goal of Proposition 10 was to increase the tax on cigarettes to discourage teens from initiating smoking. Research has indicated that young smokers are at an increased risk for chronic smoking, but that increasing the cost of cigarettes decreases the rate at which teens smoke. Healthy choices are not simply a matter of education but, as most research indicates, are the result of complex interactions among personal, social and environmental factors.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1998 | From Reuters
Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission said Monday they would seek to dismiss the government's case against R.J. Reynolds Tobacco over its Joe Camel advertising campaign, after tobacco companies reached a landmark $206-billion settlement with 46 states.
NEWS
October 9, 1998 | From Associated Press
The number of American youths taking up smoking as a daily habit jumped 73% between Joe Camel's debut in 1988 and 1996, the federal government said Thursday. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said tobacco ads that rely heavily on giveaways and kid-friendly cartoons are partly to blame. More than 1.2 million Americans younger than 18 started smoking daily in 1996, up from 708,000 in 1988, the CDC estimated. The rate at which teens started smoking also increased, climbing 50%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1994
William F. Reilly, chairman of the company that publishes the Weekly Reader, a current-events newspaper for schoolchildren, says each of his publications has total editorial independence. Weekly Reader Editor Sandra Maccarone says corporate ownership played no role in her decision to run this week's cover story for fifth graders--10-year-olds--entitled "Do Cigarettes Have a Future?" Reilly and Maccarone may be entirely sincere.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1998
"Outlook for Tobacco Makes RJR a Bargain Hunter's Dream" [Street View, June 23] is a perfect example of something that makes sense from a purely business standpoint but is totally amoral. It's a look at tobacco stocks as a way of making money. Tobacco kills hundreds of thousands each year; it has been and still is shamelessly peddled to adolescents by corrupt companies who know very well its addictive and disease-causing properties. The diagram even uses the Joe Camel picture, one of the most cynical publicity icons ever devised.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1998 | SHAWN HUBLER
So you're in your car, listening to the radio, which is tuned to the Dodger station because you're a big baseball fan. And your little kid is with you, blissing out on the whole, G-rated, parent-kid-baseball-radio-experience, when all of a sudden, the announcer turns PG-13: Hey, kids! Here's your chance to win some cool new gear and tickets to a Dodger game! Just tell us in 30 words or less why smoking SUCKS!! Well, um, good message, but--did they have to say it quite that way?
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