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Joe Carter

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January 31, 1988 | Associated Press
When Brett Butler left Cleveland to sign a free-agent deal with San Francisco, Indians' Manager Doc Edwards wasted no time deciding on his replacement. "I wanted to get Joe Carter in one set position anyway, and I wanted to get him out of the infield because he has tremendous speed," Edwards said. Edwards briefly considered moving Cory Snyder from right field to center, but Carter's range was the deciding factor.
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SPORTS
April 6, 2009 | Mike Penner
The greatest home run in the history of Canadian baseball doesn't get the attention it deserves, says the man who hit it, Joe Carter. Carter won the 1993 World Series for the Toronto Blue Jays with a three-run home run against Philadelphia Phillies closer Mitch Williams in the bottom of the ninth inning, but when discussion turns to the greatest World Series home runs of them all, Carter's is always listed below Kirk Gibson's in 1988, Carlton Fisk's in 1975 and Bill Mazeroski's in 1960.
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SPORTS
December 6, 1989 | Associated Press
Joe Carter reached agreement with San Diego on a three-year contract today, clearing the way for the Padres to complete a multiplayer trade that will send Sandy Alomar Jr. to the Cleveland Indians, the Associated Press learned. Sources said the deal was to be announced this afternoon at baseball's winter meetings. Cleveland and the Padres reached agreement late Monday night on Carter, one of baseball's biggest sluggers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joe Carter, 78, a member of the famous Carter family of country music, died Wednesday of cancer in Maces Springs, Va. Carter was a cornerstone of the preservation of old-time mountain music and helped build the Carter Family Fold in Hiltons, Va., which presents country and bluegrass music shows every weekend. Joe Carter was 5 months old when he traveled with his parents, A.P. and Sara Carter, from Maces Springs to Bristol, Va.
SPORTS
April 24, 1990 | From Associated Press
The San Diego Padres expected solid run production from Joe Carter when they acquired him in a three-for-one trade with the Cleveland Indians last December. Carter, however, began the season with only one home run and six runs batted in in his first 47 at-bats with the Padres. But Monday night at San Diego, he broke out of his slump in a big way, driving in a career-high seven runs with a grand slam, double and single as the Padres routed the Giants, 13-3, in a game delayed twice by rain.
SPORTS
June 26, 1994 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has driven in so many runs, delivered so many clutch hits, that he simply visualizes it happening again when the situation arises, sees himself responding. But although he clearly is baseball's leading run producer of the last decade, with totals for the last eight years virtually unmatched in any era, it is as if the Toronto Blue Jay right fielder is taken for granted.
SPORTS
December 3, 1989 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Padre Manager Jack McKeon's eyelids were at half-mast. His throat was sore. His hair was mussed. It is the eve of the annual baseball winter meetings, and although trade talks won't begin in earnest until today, McKeon admitted that he's exhausted. "I was up all night Friday," McKeon said. "I just couldn't sleep. I laid in bed all night just thinking of everything that we're trying to do."
SPORTS
December 5, 1989 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Padres acquired the rights to center fielder Joe Carter from the Cleveland Indians on Monday night, sources said, in exchange for catcher Sandy Alomar, left fielder Chris James and minor-league third baseman Carlos Baerga. The deal was consummated at about 10 p.m. PST Monday, according to sources close to the negotiations, but will not be finalized or announced until the Padres sign Carter to a contract extension.
SPORTS
April 9, 1990 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The telephone calls rouse him in the morning. They awaken him at night. They come at all hours of the day. The only consistent pattern is that they usually occur at the beginning of the month. When you have 10 brothers and sisters and 38 nephews and nieces, telephone calls from your kin are expected. When you've just signed a three-year, $9.2-million contract with the Padres, including a $2-million signing bonus, you can usually guess what they want.
NEWS
April 9, 1990 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's no boasting. No signs of arrogance. Not even a hint of cockiness. Unlike a year ago, when the Padres appeared to be more worried about their allotment of World Series tickets than opening day, these Padres enter the 1990 season exuding a quiet, comfortable confidence. They watched all spring how they clobbered opponents with ease. They saw how easily the runs kept coming across the plate. They were reminded how baseball can be fun again.
SPORTS
October 23, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From any angle, it was a great story. When Joe Carter was told in 1990 that he'd been traded to Toronto, he cried. But on this night six years ago, Toronto had gone from the worst place to be to a baseball paradise in Carter's mind. Of course, this was moments after he'd given the Blue Jays a World Series championship with a ninth-inning, three-run homer against Philadelphia at Toronto's SkyDome.
SPORTS
August 30, 1998 | From Associated Press
Days like these might tempt Joe Carter to think again about retiring after this season. "No, that's in stone," Carter said after going three for five with a double and home run to help the San Francisco Giants beat the Philadelphia Phillies, 10-3, Saturday. "I never said I was going to retire because I couldn't do the job anymore," Carter said. "I've won two championships, and I want one more, but I want to go home and see my kids."
SPORTS
June 13, 1998 | From Associated Press
Joe Carter made a triumphant return to Toronto by driving in three runs, helping Mike Mussina record his first win since returning from the disabled list and leading the Baltimore Orioles to a 9-5 victory over the Blue Jays. Carter received a standing ovation from the crowd at SkyDome, returning to the city where he spent most of the past decade. He was a member of the Blue Jays for the previous seven seasons before signing a free-agent deal with the Orioles during the off-season.
SPORTS
April 2, 1998 | KEN ROSENTHAL, BALTIMORE SUN
No team has ever had two players hit their 400th home runs in the same season, and the Orioles probably won't be the first. Still, Joe Carter is only 22 homers short, Cal Ripken 29. One way or another, the Stone Age Orioles should be good for a few milestones. Ripken hit career homer No. 371 Wednesday night, driving a grand slam into the left-field seats in the first inning of the Orioles' 10-1 victory over Kansas City.
SPORTS
July 21, 1997 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This season has been disappointing enough for the Toronto Blue Jays, who with the addition of Roger Clemens were expected to be much improved from their fourth-place finish last season. On Sunday afternoon, that disappointment turned to bitterness for the Blue Jays, who were literally run out of Anaheim Stadium during their 9-5 loss to Angels. In the third inning, Toronto Manager Cito Gaston was tossed by first base umpire Mike Everitt for arguing a close play.
SPORTS
July 28, 1996 | From Associated Press
With Mark McGwire resting his aching back, Joe Carter took over the home run spotlight at SkyDome. Carter became the third player to homer to the stadium's fifth deck, hitting a three-run drive Saturday to lead the Toronto Blue Jays to a 6-4 victory over the Oakland Athletics. Carter's homer off John Wasdin (6-3) traveled an estimated 483 feet.
SPORTS
April 6, 2009 | Mike Penner
The greatest home run in the history of Canadian baseball doesn't get the attention it deserves, says the man who hit it, Joe Carter. Carter won the 1993 World Series for the Toronto Blue Jays with a three-run home run against Philadelphia Phillies closer Mitch Williams in the bottom of the ninth inning, but when discussion turns to the greatest World Series home runs of them all, Carter's is always listed below Kirk Gibson's in 1988, Carlton Fisk's in 1975 and Bill Mazeroski's in 1960.
SPORTS
October 16, 1992 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Gaston will probably announce today how he will reconfigure his lineup without a designated hitter in the first two games. Dave Winfield hit .300 in the playoffs and .290 with 26 home runs and 108 runs batted in during the season, and Gaston might put him in right field and move Joe Carter to first, benching John Olerud. The drawbacks: Winfield played only 26 games in right field this season, and Carter played first only four times.
SPORTS
June 17, 1996 | MIKE TERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not Joe Carter's fault the Toronto Blue Jays managed only one victory against the Angels in the weekend four-game series. The 12-year veteran, who has raked Angel pitching at a .364 clip this season, was a one-man wrecking crew. Of his five hits, three were home runs--three-run shots Friday and Saturday, and a two-run blast Sunday, his 16th--that sent Toronto on its way to a 6-4 victory. That's eight runs batted in in his last three games, 60 this season.
SPORTS
June 26, 1994 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has driven in so many runs, delivered so many clutch hits, that he simply visualizes it happening again when the situation arises, sees himself responding. But although he clearly is baseball's leading run producer of the last decade, with totals for the last eight years virtually unmatched in any era, it is as if the Toronto Blue Jay right fielder is taken for granted.
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