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Joe Cicippio

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NEWS
June 28, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes, late at night, it all comes back to Joe Cicippio. The horror of Russian Roulette. The time his guards threatened to castrate him. The trauma of 1,908 days in captivity. Six months after he was freed by his Lebanese kidnapers, Cicippio still has trouble sleeping and often gets up at 3 a.m. to pace the floor. Those are the good nights. Sometimes, he wakes up screaming. "I hear him shouting 'No! No!' and wake him up," says his wife, Elham.
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NEWS
June 28, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN
Imagine a world of darkened rooms and masked guards. For most of five years, you're chained to a wall and deprived of any outside news. Going to the bathroom requires an appointment, and rifles are pointed at you much of the time. That sums up Joe Cicippio's daily routine during the 1,908 days he was held hostage in Beirut. His experience was similar to that of other American captives, but there were key differences that left a lasting impact. For example, hostages like David P.
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NEWS
June 28, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN
Imagine a world of darkened rooms and masked guards. For most of five years, you're chained to a wall and deprived of any outside news. Going to the bathroom requires an appointment, and rifles are pointed at you much of the time. That sums up Joe Cicippio's daily routine during the 1,908 days he was held hostage in Beirut. His experience was similar to that of other American captives, but there were key differences that left a lasting impact. For example, hostages like David P.
NEWS
June 28, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes, late at night, it all comes back to Joe Cicippio. The horror of Russian Roulette. The time his guards threatened to castrate him. The trauma of 1,908 days in captivity. Six months after he was freed by his Lebanese kidnapers, Cicippio still has trouble sleeping and often gets up at 3 a.m. to pace the floor. Those are the good nights. Sometimes, he wakes up screaming. "I hear him shouting 'No! No!' and wake him up," says his wife, Elham.
NEWS
November 7, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Former hostage David Jacobsen returned home "to the land of the living" today for a warm welcome from President Reagan and urged reporters "in the name of God . . . back off" from their questions lest they endanger the lives of other hostages.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Joseph J. Cicippio was ambushed and kidnaped by gunmen at the American University of Beirut five years ago, the only traces left behind were bloodstains from a pistol-whipping and a pair of broken eyeglasses. Both were evidence, friends said, that the strong-willed Pennsylvanian had put up a good fight. And they were not surprised. "Joe Cicippio was not the sort of guy to go quietly," a colleague then told reporters in Beirut.
NEWS
November 8, 1986 | ELEANOR CLIFT, Times Staff Writer
Former hostage David P. Jacobsen, welcomed by President Reagan at the White House, expressed his "eternal gratitude" Friday to the President but pleaded with the press to "be responsible" and refrain from writing about any possible deals between the Administration and Iran to win the freedom of five hostages still held in Lebanon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1986 | United Press International
Following is the text of the statement by released American hostage David Jacobsen of Huntington Beach, Calif., upon his arrival at Andrews Air Force Base, Md.: I hope that you have plenty of film. I love America. I'm just so thrilled today that I'm here to be back with everyone and with my family. I have prayed for this day for 17 months. I was one voice in a chorus of millions of believers all over the world who share my faith in God.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1989 | JEAN DAVIDSON, Times Staff Writer
Former hostage David Jacobsen reacted angrily Monday to reports that Marine Lt. Col. William Higgins has been hanged in retaliation for Israel's kidnaping of a Muslem cleric, and charged that the military operation may have scuttled the anticipated release of another American captive in Lebanon.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former hostages David P. Jacobsen and Joseph J. Cicippio said they filed a lawsuit Wednesday seeking $600 million of Iran's frozen assets on the grounds its government sponsored "commercial terrorism." "Our lawsuit is significant because it's a matter of principle more than money," said Jacobsen of Huntington Beach. "It's not just Joe Cicippio and I on this. If there are any judgments, we hope to share that with the other ex-hostages." The civil suit was filed in U.S.
NEWS
September 13, 1986 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
An American banker working for the American University of Beirut was kidnaped Friday from the university's guarded campus in West Beirut. The victim was Joseph J. Cicippio, 55, and his abduction was the second involving a U.S. citizen in the Lebanese capital this week. Five Americans are now believed to be in captivity in Lebanon. The latest kidnapings, after months of relative quiet, appeared to be a challenge to Syrian authority in the Muslim sector of Beirut.
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