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NEWS
March 19, 1989 | DAVE JOHNSON
--Joe Clark, the bat-carrying principal portrayed in the film "Lean on Me," said through personal manager Vincent Fusco that he will take a leave of absence when the school year ends and has had discussions with drug control director William J. Bennett about a possible post in President Bush's Administration. " . . . I doubt I'll ever come back. My soul is tired and fatigued from fighting an educational system that is rotten to the core," he said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2012
Joe Clarke Youth basketball icon in Los Angeles Joe Clarke, 75 , a youth basketball icon in Los Angeles for nearly 40 years who founded the Watts Magicians travel team and helped dozens of boys and girls try to reach their basketball dreams on and off the court, died Thursday at Lakewood Regional Medical Center after an illness, according to family friend Ronald Scipio. Born in Panama on Jan. 11, 1936, Clarke teamed with Willie Naulls to create the South-Central L.A. Athletic Club, which evolved into the Watts Magicians travel team.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
While students and teachers watched in shock, a troupe of Latin dancers ended a performance at Eastside High School in Paterson, N.J., by stripping down to their G-strings. Now, two weeks later, the school board must decide whether to punish the school's controversial principal, Joe Clark.
NEWS
June 26, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Joe Clark, a former prime minister who led the nation for a fleeting nine months nearly two decades ago, returned to politics, announcing his candidacy to lead the limping Progressive Conservative Party, which once governed the country. If he wins the leadership of the Conservatives, the 59-year-old Clark faces a herculean task in rebuilding the depleted party.
NEWS
May 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
Joe Clark, the high school principal who gained national fame by roaming hallways with a bat and bullhorn, will undergo surgery today to remove bacteria infecting his heart valve, a cardiologist said. Clark, 52, was admitted Wednesday to Beth Israel Hospital with a high fever, Dr. Sharlene Watts said.
NEWS
June 26, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Joe Clark, a former prime minister who led the nation for a fleeting nine months nearly two decades ago, returned to politics, announcing his candidacy to lead the limping Progressive Conservative Party, which once governed the country. If he wins the leadership of the Conservatives, the 59-year-old Clark faces a herculean task in rebuilding the depleted party.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1989 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Round Two in the Joe Clark story: The controversial high school principal whose efforts to bring pride to an inner-city New Jersey high school, are chronicled in the new film "Lean on Me," is throwing punches at heavyweight champion Mike Tyson. Clark, is angry that Tyson has gotten $150,000 from Warner Bros. for a "Lean on Me" commercial, while, Clark said, he has been promoting the film for free and was paid only $15,000 for his story and "a small percentage" of the film's profits.
NEWS
January 10, 1988
Joe Clark, the embattled Paterson, N.J., school principal, can always have a job at the White House if his school board "is foolish enough" to fire him. Gary Bauer, head of President Reagan's Domestic Policy Council, said he called Clark and told him: "I'd be happy to have you on my staff advising me on children's education and values." But he also urged Clark "to hang in there," and said: "Joe Clark embodies what President Reagan and Education Secretary William J.
NEWS
February 12, 1988 | JAMES MARNELL
It took a helicopter and mountain climbers to rescue Pepper and Sam from 500-foot-high sandstone ledges near Moab, Utah, but the key ingredient of the story was a drugged meatball. Pepper, 2, and Sam, 1, are heeler-labrador mixes who wandered away from their home in Moab about three weeks ago and were not seen until hikers spotted them 5 miles from town. By the time climbers Kirk DeFond and G.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Joe Clark, the controversial educator who a week ago announced his impending resignation as principal of Eastside High School in Paterson, N.J., is coming to Hollywood to guest star on an episode of "227," NBC's half-hour sitcom about family life in a black neighborhood in Washington. On the episode, to be taped April 11 for possible airing the following week, Clark will play himself and encourage a high school drop-out to resume his education.
NEWS
February 24, 1998
Manuel Dewey Clark Jr., 75, a country music star known as Old Joe Clark. Famous for his hillbilly humor and spirited banjo playing, Clark performed for many years with the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville. He also played with Bill Monroe's Blue Grass Boys and for 50 years at the Renfro Valley Barn Dance. On Friday in Richmond, Ky., of complications after abdominal surgery.
NEWS
September 28, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joe Clark, the tough-love principal who inspired the movie "Lean on Me," is under fire in his new post as director of a Newark, N.J., youth detention center for putting teenagers in handcuffs and leg irons. "They were not abused, they were not beaten, they were simply handled in a manner commensurate with their unacceptable behavior," Clark said. The 12 boys, ages 17 and 18, were shackled for two days last week after several violent episodes in which they hurled excrement at guards, he said.
SPORTS
September 23, 1992 | JAY HOVDEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joe Clark's job is tough enough. He doesn't need unnecessary risks. As one of the assistant starters on Jay Slender's gate crew at Fairplex Park, Clark finds himself cheek to cheek with nasty, ill-behaved animals all day. So what was Clark doing out there in the middle of the track Monday afternoon, waving a rake at an oncoming field of thoroughbreds? Saving lives.
NEWS
February 18, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suppose for a moment that you're the leader of a peaceable middle-sized power, and your approval rating is in the basement. Suppose you're facing the hideously real possibility that one of your largest, most important provinces will soon break away. And suppose your credibility is in such a shambles that you can do next to nothing about anything. That is the bind in which Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney has found himself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1991 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A renovated slum on Skid Row reopened as new housing for mentally ill homeless people Thursday, and Joe Clark, its new manager, hurried to make everything "picture perfect," with last-minute cleaning, setting out chairs and blowing up balloons. For Clark, LAMP Lodge was a new beginning, a world away from the time he wandered the streets of Skid Row, confused and disoriented. "I don't know how to feel," the quiet 35-year-old said when asked how he felt about his new post.
SPORTS
May 20, 1990 | MIKE DOWNEY
Joetta Clark never suspected how famous her father could become just by carrying a baseball bat. It startled her when, one day, she picked up a copy of Time magazine and found her father's face on the cover. Then, when they made a movie of his life and hired one of America's most distinguished actors to portray him, it really boggled Joetta's mind. "That man with the baseball bat," she said, "that man was somebody I didn't know."
NEWS
May 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
Joe Clark, the high school principal who gained national fame by roaming hallways with a bat and bullhorn, will undergo surgery today to remove bacteria infecting his heart valve, a cardiologist said. Clark, 52, was admitted Wednesday to Beth Israel Hospital with a high fever, Dr. Sharlene Watts said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Joe Clark, the controversial educator who a week ago announced his impending resignation as principal of Eastside High School in Paterson, N.J., is coming to Hollywood to guest star on an episode of "227," NBC's half-hour sitcom about family life in a black neighborhood in Washington. On the episode, to be taped April 11 for possible airing the following week, Clark will play himself and encourage a high school drop-out to resume his education.
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