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Joe Connolly

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NEWS
October 9, 1994
Re: "The Vigilante of Carthay Square" (Sept. 25) Hooray for Joe Connolly. Local police no longer serve as a preventive deterrent to the criminal element but often are a reactive after-thought, i.e., the crime has been perpetrated, you are now a victim, and the police arrive 30 minutes later to take a report. It is quite evident that the Thin Blue Line cannot effectively police our communities. Living here during the L.A. riots has revealed the impotence of law enforcement. The sense of frustration and feeling of dissatisfaction (with police)
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 11 candidates competing for the 5th District seat on the Los Angeles City Council reported Friday they have spent $1.4 million in total, shattering the record for a council race since the Ethics Commission began tracking campaign finances. The previous spending mark for a council race, according to Ethics Commission records going back to 1989, was also in the 5th District, when a field of four candidates spent $1.1 million in the 1995 primary.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1996 | AL MARTINEZ
To sit across from Joe Connolly is to face a hurricane in full force and try to figure out what it's saying. His words come at you like debris flying in the wind and you only get snatches of meaning as they go hurtling on by. They all say something about how much Connolly hates graffiti and how he's the only one in America who can solve the problem of graffiti and how . . . well, I missed that one, it went by too fast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 11 candidates competing for the 5th District seat on the Los Angeles City Council reported Friday that they have spent $1.4 million so far, shattering the record for a council seat since the Los Angeles Ethics Commission began tracking campaign finances. The previous spending mark for a council race, according to Ethics Commission records going back to 1989, was also in the 5th District, when a field of four candidates spent $1.1 million in the 1995 primary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five candidates for Los Angeles' 5th City Council District called Friday for Police Chief Bernard C. Parks to be replaced as part of an effort to restore the credibility of the department. Other candidates, including former state Sen. Tom Hayden and former federal prosecutor Jack Weiss, also criticized the chief but did not call for his replacement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2000 | AL MARTINEZ
I admit that when Joe Connolly announced he was going to make a run for the L.A. City Council, I could hardly wait to talk to him. There was an off-the-wall column waiting. Joe is one of the town's great characters, a fearless graffiti-fighting vigilante who jumps into the face of gangbangers and tells them to straighten out or move on. At 45, he radiates the kind of energy that gets him up at 5 a.m.
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | CAROL CHASTANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the harsh sunlight of a late summer afternoon Joe Connolly slowly drove through an alley near Pico Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue. He spotted two men breaking into the trunk of a car. One ran away, but his partner angrily marched toward Connolly. "You leave me alone, you crazy fool," the man screamed, jabbing his finger in Connolly's face. "You're harassing me." Connolly smiled, unperturbed. "The best way for me to leave you alone is for you to leave the neighborhood," Connolly said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As home to many of Los Angeles' most affluent neighborhoods and vibrant cultural institutions, the 5th Council District has lived up to its reputation for political activism by producing the largest field of candidates running for any council seat in the April 10 election. Voters in the district, which extends from Westwood through Bel-Air to Van Nuys, will pick from among 11 candidates--twice the average for other council seats--including former state Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five candidates for Los Angeles City Council on Friday called for LAPD Chief Bernard Parks to be replaced, but two top candidates seeking the 5th District seat disagreed. At a forum, Ken Gerston, Jill Barad, Robyn Ritter Simon, Laura Lake and Joe Connolly said removing Parks is essential to restoring the credibility of the Los Angeles Police Department in the wake of the Rampart Division corruption scandal and plummeting officer morale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 11 candidates competing for the 5th District seat on the Los Angeles City Council reported Friday they have spent $1.4 million in total, shattering the record for a council race since the Ethics Commission began tracking campaign finances. The previous spending mark for a council race, according to Ethics Commission records going back to 1989, was also in the 5th District, when a field of four candidates spent $1.1 million in the 1995 primary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five candidates for Los Angeles City Council on Friday called for LAPD Chief Bernard Parks to be replaced, but two top candidates seeking the 5th District seat disagreed. At a forum, Ken Gerston, Jill Barad, Robyn Ritter Simon, Laura Lake and Joe Connolly said removing Parks is essential to restoring the credibility of the Los Angeles Police Department in the wake of the Rampart Division corruption scandal and plummeting officer morale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five candidates for Los Angeles' 5th City Council District called Friday for Police Chief Bernard C. Parks to be replaced as part of an effort to restore the credibility of the department. Other candidates, including former state Sen. Tom Hayden and former federal prosecutor Jack Weiss, also criticized the chief but did not call for his replacement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As home to many of Los Angeles' most affluent neighborhoods and vibrant cultural institutions, the 5th Council District has lived up to its reputation for political activism by producing the largest field of candidates running for any council seat in the April 10 election. Voters in the district, which extends from Westwood through Bel-Air to Van Nuys, will pick from among 11 candidates--twice the average for other council seats--including former state Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2000 | AL MARTINEZ
I admit that when Joe Connolly announced he was going to make a run for the L.A. City Council, I could hardly wait to talk to him. There was an off-the-wall column waiting. Joe is one of the town's great characters, a fearless graffiti-fighting vigilante who jumps into the face of gangbangers and tells them to straighten out or move on. At 45, he radiates the kind of energy that gets him up at 5 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1996 | AL MARTINEZ
To sit across from Joe Connolly is to face a hurricane in full force and try to figure out what it's saying. His words come at you like debris flying in the wind and you only get snatches of meaning as they go hurtling on by. They all say something about how much Connolly hates graffiti and how he's the only one in America who can solve the problem of graffiti and how . . . well, I missed that one, it went by too fast.
NEWS
October 9, 1994
Re: "The Vigilante of Carthay Square" (Sept. 25) Hooray for Joe Connolly. Local police no longer serve as a preventive deterrent to the criminal element but often are a reactive after-thought, i.e., the crime has been perpetrated, you are now a victim, and the police arrive 30 minutes later to take a report. It is quite evident that the Thin Blue Line cannot effectively police our communities. Living here during the L.A. riots has revealed the impotence of law enforcement. The sense of frustration and feeling of dissatisfaction (with police)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 11 candidates competing for the 5th District seat on the Los Angeles City Council reported Friday that they have spent $1.4 million so far, shattering the record for a council seat since the Los Angeles Ethics Commission began tracking campaign finances. The previous spending mark for a council race, according to Ethics Commission records going back to 1989, was also in the 5th District, when a field of four candidates spent $1.1 million in the 1995 primary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1994 | Joe Connolly was interviewed by free-lance writer Trin Yarborough. and
Respect. It's all about respect. I've made progress fighting graffiti and crime in our neighborhood without any weapon. Of 56 homes on our block where I'm the Neighborhood Watch captain, mine is one of only a handful that doesn't have guns, although I've had guns pulled on me many times. Instead, I confront people with respect. And it works. Taggers and gangs put up their signs in graffiti to mark territory.
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | CAROL CHASTANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the harsh sunlight of a late summer afternoon Joe Connolly slowly drove through an alley near Pico Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue. He spotted two men breaking into the trunk of a car. One ran away, but his partner angrily marched toward Connolly. "You leave me alone, you crazy fool," the man screamed, jabbing his finger in Connolly's face. "You're harassing me." Connolly smiled, unperturbed. "The best way for me to leave you alone is for you to leave the neighborhood," Connolly said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1994 | Joe Connolly was interviewed by free-lance writer Trin Yarborough. and
Respect. It's all about respect. I've made progress fighting graffiti and crime in our neighborhood without any weapon. Of 56 homes on our block where I'm the Neighborhood Watch captain, mine is one of only a handful that doesn't have guns, although I've had guns pulled on me many times. Instead, I confront people with respect. And it works. Taggers and gangs put up their signs in graffiti to mark territory.
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