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Joe D Price

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Relationships between collectors and museums tend to be delicate affairs that shift with the sands of time. Long after the courtship is over and the marriage is consummated, disputes and misunderstandings can shatter the peace. A current case in point concerns Japanese art collectors Joe D. Price and his wife Etsuko and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.
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NEWS
August 2, 1992
Edo paintings like those in the Shin'enkan collection, broadly considered the most outstanding assemblage of the period outside Japan, were not always treasured. Produced from 1615 to 1868, they are delicate and lovely paintings on large paneled screens and silken scrolls, some of them depicting brightly colored animals and others subdued pastel flowers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1988 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Times Staff Writer
When architect Bruce Goff died in 1982, his grand and highly unusual plan to house patron Joe D. Price's art collection was still in its design phase. It was Goff's longtime colleague and former associate Bart Prince who translated Goff's designs into the $13-million, 32,100-square-foot Pavilion for Japanese Art opening Sunday at the County Museum of Art.
NEWS
August 2, 1992 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a guy with a $50-million art collection, Joe Price sure has some bare walls in his home. Of course, with a crib like this, who needs art? Filled with secret staircases and hidden doors and walls of voluptuously swirling wood, his oceanfront masterpiece contains what might be called the fur room, a child's bedroom with a slide to the playroom and a kitchen to rival the Jetsons'.
NEWS
August 2, 1992
Edo paintings like those in the Shin'enkan collection, broadly considered the most outstanding assemblage of the period outside Japan, were not always treasured. Produced from 1615 to 1868, they are delicate and lovely paintings on large paneled screens and silken scrolls, some of them depicting brightly colored animals and others subdued pastel flowers.
NEWS
August 2, 1992 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a guy with a $50-million art collection, Joe Price sure has some bare walls in his home. Of course, with a crib like this, who needs art? Filled with secret staircases and hidden doors and walls of voluptuously swirling wood, his oceanfront masterpiece contains what might be called the fur room, a child's bedroom with a slide to the playroom and a kitchen to rival the Jetsons'.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2000 | IRVINE
Japanese art fans can attend a lecture and video next week on masterpieces created during the Edo period. The lecture by renowned collector Joe D. Price will take place at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Central Library, 7111 Talbert Ave. The presentation will include images of beautiful works never before seen in the United States. The show is sponsored by the Sister City Assn. of Huntington Beach and the Japan American Society. Admission is $15. Students will be admitted free.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1987
Toshio Nagamura, chairman of the California First Bank, and art collector Joe D. Price have joined the board of trustees at the County Museum of Art. Nagamura is president of the Japanese Chamber of Commerce of Southern California and a member of the museum's fund-raising committee for the Pavilion for Japanese Art currently under construction. He has chaired California First Bank since 1984, supervising 135 offices across the state and five overseas facilities.
NEWS
March 16, 1986
Highlights from the Shin'enkan Collection, which scholars consider the most outstanding assemblage of Japanese paintings from the Edo period (1615-1868) in the Western world, are at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 5905 Wilshire Blvd. The show, which runs through May 18, includes 75 screens and scrolls, including the best works of about 30 master artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2003 | Louise Roug
The top spender on art in the world, Sheik Saud al Thani of Qatar, shelled out several hundred million dollars during the last few years, according to ARTnews. The magazine's annual list of top art collectors is in its summer issue, which will be on newsstands Friday. A few Angelenos made the list, including (in alphabetical order) Edythe and Eli Broad, David Geffen, Audrey Irmas, Peter Norton, Michael Ovitz (who's new), Etsuko and Joe D. Price, Beth Swofford and Dean Valentine.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Relationships between collectors and museums tend to be delicate affairs that shift with the sands of time. Long after the courtship is over and the marriage is consummated, disputes and misunderstandings can shatter the peace. A current case in point concerns Japanese art collectors Joe D. Price and his wife Etsuko and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1988 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Times Staff Writer
When architect Bruce Goff died in 1982, his grand and highly unusual plan to house patron Joe D. Price's art collection was still in its design phase. It was Goff's longtime colleague and former associate Bart Prince who translated Goff's designs into the $13-million, 32,100-square-foot Pavilion for Japanese Art opening Sunday at the County Museum of Art.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1986 | WILLIAM WILSON, Times Art Critic
The County Museum of Art announced plans Wednesday to erect a 22-story building across the street from its Wilshire Boulevard facility to help solve some of its most nagging problems: parking, expansion and income. To be called Museum Center, the structure envisioned at Spaulding Avenue and Wilshire Boulevard will sit on a two-acre site purchased in June, 1985, for $8 million by the Museum Associates, a nonprofit private support group.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1988 | ZAN DUBIN
To the thunderous beat of huge, barrel-shaped taiko drums, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art opened its Pavilion for Japanese Art on Sunday, finally allowing the public a good look at the provocative edifice that's been under construction beside the La Brea tar pits for two years. "The drums are an important part of Shinto festivals," Robert T. Singer, the museum's Japanese art curator, said above the roar. "They're used to summon the gods and the gods' blessings."
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