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Joe Feshbach

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BUSINESS
October 14, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One quick glance around the Palo Alto offices of Feshbach Bros. suffices to show that this is no typical bullish investment firm. First, there are the bears: stuffed Teddy bears, bronze bears, ceramic bears, crystal bears, paintings of bears. Then there is the bust of the late L. Ron Hubbard, self-styled management guru and founder of the controversial Church of Scientology, which has waged fierce battle with the Internal Revenue Service over its tax-exempt status.
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BUSINESS
October 14, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One quick glance around the Palo Alto offices of Feshbach Bros. suffices to show that this is no typical bullish investment firm. First, there are the bears: stuffed Teddy bears, bronze bears, ceramic bears, crystal bears, paintings of bears. Then there is the bust of the late L. Ron Hubbard, self-styled management guru and founder of the controversial Church of Scientology, which has waged fierce battle with the Internal Revenue Service over its tax-exempt status.
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BUSINESS
March 11, 1990 | BRIAN ROONEY, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
In April, 1987, when federal regulators were investigating suspicious dealings at American Continental Corp., three brothers in Palo Alto were laying a bet that the regulators would find trouble. The Feshbach Bros.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO
Las Vegas oddsmakers wouldn't have placed very good numbers on this matchup in Newport Beach this week: With the Dow Jones average near record highs, three stock market bears go before 130-some pension fund managers to plead their case. It didn't go well at all. But if you put any credence in the idea that the majority view of the market is often dead wrong, the poor reception for the bears could be a flashing red light.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1989 | JAMES F. PELTZ, Times Staff Writer
Short sellers are having a tough time in the stock market this year, and Kathryn Staley, an investment adviser in Atlanta, has a pithy if surreal explanation why: "Trash is levitating," she says. The market's strong rally this year--up 25% so far, as measured by Standard & Poor's 500 index--is lifting stocks of both sound companies as well as mediocre ones whose prices might otherwise be tumbling into oblivion.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO
Some of the sharpest people on Wall Street were buying bank stocks late last year, when nobody else wanted them. Now, with many of the stocks up 40% or more in five months, the industry's fans are multiplying faster than empty office buildings in downtown Los Angeles. It makes you wonder: Is it smarter to bail from the banks at this point, or join the crowd? Most Wells Fargo & Co. shareholders probably don't want to leave the party. Their stock hit an all-time high of $95.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1990 | TOM PETRUNO
Oil and gold stocks have led the market since the Mideast crisis began. But some investors have also rushed into so-called defensive stocks: food, drug, beverage and tobacco issues. The conventional wisdom is that those companies' businesses are recession-resistant and, therefore, the stocks should perform well no matter what happens. Defensiveness, however, only goes so far.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1992 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wall Street's bad news bears, the short sellers, are starting to growl again. Short sellers, who try to profit from stocks dropping in price, were pummeled last year because the market went up instead. As a result, several of the so-called "shorts" vanished from the market, and some prominent remaining short sellers saw their assets evaporate by 50% or more. But the bears aren't all in hibernation.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To its true believers, Ventura-based Benton Oil & Gas Co. is the seed of a $500-million energy company of the 1990s. To its detractors, Benton Oil is an outrageously hyped little oil exploration firm whose market value is inflated and whose financial situation is tenuous at best. The bulls and bears have been battling over Benton Oil for more than a year, in which time the company's stock mushroomed from $2 a share to more than $18 before backing off to $10.50 now.
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