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Joe Frazier

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December 8, 1996 | J. R. Moehringer, J. R. Moehringer is an Orange County staff writer
My grandmother gave it all she had, but she just couldn't beat Muhammad Ali. She got him on the ropes in the middle rounds, but he wore her down--gradually, pitilessly--and in the 12th he knocked her sideways. Ali probably thought he was fighting Joe Frazier at the time. But, in fact, Frazier was channeling my grandmother, the fiercest of Ali's apron-clad enemies.
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SPORTS
September 12, 2013 | By Barry Stavro
About 150,000 spectators squeezed into Soldier Field in Chicago that night in September, 1927, and many left convinced they'd witnessed the fight of the century. The drama's high point came in Round 7 when former champion Jack Dempsey stung Gene Tunney with a savage left hook to the jaw, part of a six-punch flurry that dumped the heavyweight champ on the canvas. Tunney, his arm grabbing a ring rope, seemed glassy-eyed as he sat for 14 seconds while the referee delayed starting a count till Dempsey moved to a neutral corner.
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NATIONAL
June 11, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
To some, it's just the In & Out furniture outlet, but to those who remember, the unremarkable building on Philadelphia's north side is where a legend trained - and where great stories were born. It was a gym back then, and word spread fast in the neighborhood when Muhammad Ali banged his fists on the windows. "Let's go, coward," Ali taunted, staring through the plate glass toward the center of the boxing ring. Joe Frazier stared back. Ali was picking a fight with Smokin' Joe Frazier?
NATIONAL
June 11, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
To some, it's just the In & Out furniture outlet, but to those who remember, the unremarkable building on Philadelphia's north side is where a legend trained - and where great stories were born. It was a gym back then, and word spread fast in the neighborhood when Muhammad Ali banged his fists on the windows. "Let's go, coward," Ali taunted, staring through the plate glass toward the center of the boxing ring. Joe Frazier stared back. Ali was picking a fight with Smokin' Joe Frazier?
SPORTS
January 16, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
Muhammad Ali turns 70 on Tuesday, and for many of those 70 years, he has had us all on the ropes. To say he is merely a famous boxer is to say the sky is always blue. There are so many sides to him his nickname should be Octagon. Now, he is revered. Passage of time softens and endears. He is ill, and has been since 1984, when he first received a diagnosis of Parkinson's. That was just three years after his final fight, when he made one last, mostly pathetic, effort to convince the world he was still "the Greatest.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2009 | Reed Johnson
Smokin' Joe is on the phone and upside my head, joking, singing and jawing once again about the fight of the decade, of the century, some would say of all time: the so-called "Thrilla in Manila." Justifiable or not, hyperbole was the order of the day on Oct.
SPORTS
August 31, 1989
Former boxing champion Joe Frazier was released from a Philadelphia hospital, six days after being admitted for observation after a minor traffic accident.
SPORTS
June 22, 1997
* Joe Frazier--married at age 15 * Michael Jordan--cut from high school varsity, age 15 * Mary Decker--first world record, age 15 * Margaret Court--60 trophies, age 15 * Pele--first pro soccer contract, age 15-x x-Earned $75 per month Source: World Features Syndicate
SPORTS
June 4, 1986 | Associated Press
Marvis Frazier, son of former heavyweight champion Joe Frazier, will be the next opponent for undefeated Mike Tyson, on July 26 at a site to be determined, according to report in the New York Daily News. "We've got this fight already made," Joe Frazier said. "I think this is a great opportunity for Marvis, and I have no doubt he can take Tyson because of his greater experience."
NATIONAL
June 6, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
From battlefields to bridges, historic sites across the country are facing demolition, neglect and encroaching developments. The National Trust for Historic Preservation has added 11 more places to the list of the country's most endangered, including a Revolutionary War battlefield, Malcolm X's home in Boston and the Philadelphia gym where Joe Frazier once trained. The trust is a Washington-based nonprofit that seeks to preserve sites of historic significance. Every year, the group identifies a list of buildings and places that it considers most endangered.
SPORTS
January 16, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
Muhammad Ali turns 70 on Tuesday, and for many of those 70 years, he has had us all on the ropes. To say he is merely a famous boxer is to say the sky is always blue. There are so many sides to him his nickname should be Octagon. Now, he is revered. Passage of time softens and endears. He is ill, and has been since 1984, when he first received a diagnosis of Parkinson's. That was just three years after his final fight, when he made one last, mostly pathetic, effort to convince the world he was still "the Greatest.
SPORTS
November 8, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
In a sad touch of irony, Joe Frazier left the world the same week the final chapter will play out in what could be boxing's next great trilogy. Manny Pacquiao and his rival, Mexico's Juan Manuel Marquez, clash for a third time Saturday in Las Vegas with both intent to settle thequestion of who is the better man. "There are personal feelings here," Pacquiao said recently after 15 rounds of sparring at a Hollywood gym. "I'm not saying I'm...
SPORTS
November 8, 2011 | By Dylan Hernandez
Three great fights between the same boxers is a rarity in the modern era. Here's a look at some of best trilogies in recent decades. Muhammad Ali vs. Joe Frazier Frazier won the heavyweight title that was stripped from Ali because of his refusal to serve in the Vietnam War. Frazier's title was looked upon with a degree of suspicion because Ali was still undefeated. Ali returned from a three-year exile in 1970, setting up a long-awaited bout with Frazier a year later at Madison Square Garden.
SPORTS
November 8, 2011 | Bill Dwyre
You wonder if, in those last moments before he died, Joe Frazier felt one last sting of defeat, knowing Muhammad Ali would outlive him. Their trilogy of heavyweight boxing matches ended 36 years ago, but they never left Frazier's frontal lobe. As writer Erik Brady of USA Today put it so nicely in a 2009 story, Frazier and Ali are forever "joined at the arthritic hip. " In death, Smokin' Joe may finally receive a measure of the positive attention he always felt was stolen from him by Ali, a man he lost to twice in three matches and always claimed, "I whupped him three times.
NEWS
November 8, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Former undisputed heavyweight boxing champion Joe Frazier, who died Monday at the age of 67 after a brief bout with liver cancer, also had diabetes -- a major risk factor associated with the disease. Diabetes has been associated with the highest percentage (34%) of cases of the most common type of liver cancer, according to research by the National Cancer Institute. (The next highest was alcohol-related disorders, with 24%). Men and older adults are at higher risk of the cancer as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2011
Dave Duerson NFL player on Super Bowl-winning teams Dave Duerson, 50, a four-time Pro Bowl safety who played on Super Bowl winners with the Chicago Bears and New York Giants, was found dead Thursday at his home in Sunny Isles Beach, Fla. Investigators have not determined the cause of death. The Bears released a statement Friday saying they were "stunned and saddened" by the news and called Duerson "a great contributor to our team and the Chicago community. " Born Nov. 28, 1960, in Muncie, Ind., Duerson was a four-year starter at Notre Dame, where he also earned a bachelor's degree in economics.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2009 | Reed Johnson
Smokin' Joe is on the phone and upside my head, joking, singing and jawing once again about the fight of the decade, of the century, some would say of all time: the so-called "Thrilla in Manila." Justifiable or not, hyperbole was the order of the day on Oct.
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