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Joe Goode

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January 28, 1997 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
In the catalog to the exhibition "Joe Goode," which opened Sunday at the Orange County Museum of Art, there's a photograph of the artist at work in his studio. A big rectangular piece of white paper festooned with bold black markings is laid out flat on a table before him--evidently, one of the extensive series of sumi ink drawings he made in 1991 and 1992.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2009 | Victoria Looseleaf
It seemed like an ordinary shopping expedition: two gay men wandering the aisles of a San Francisco Baby Gap in search of a neo-preppy look for their tousle-haired tyke. An adorable attention-grabber, the little fella with the thin neck and long arms didn't prove the easiest of fits, however. That's because this wide-eyed boy with asymmetrical features happened to be . . . well, a puppet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1995 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 43, choreographer Joe Goode wants to settle down, to have a home with a little garden, a big tree and friendly neighbors all around. But from his vantage point on the Infobahn, that won't be any too easy. "The days when people grew up and died in the same house with the same oak tree in their back yard are gone," Goode said. "We now live in a totally mobile network, the superhighway of interchangeable reality, where as long as you have a computer modem in front of you, you're connected.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2008 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
It was any artist's nightmare. Painter Joe Goode and his wife, Hiromi Katayama, were sleeping in their Mar Vista home when their wolf-sized dog, Pollock, appeared at the foot of the bed, barking loudly. Pollock wouldn't stop until they stumbled out of bed, and followed him, half-asleep, into the small yard leading to Goode's painting studio. What Goode recalls seeing that morning seemed unimaginable, unthinkable, impossible. Smoke poured from his studio. Flames licked through the skylights.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1993 | CHRIS PASLES
Joe Goode was getting tired of being typecast. "I was constantly taking my shirt off to be the noble, wronged whatever," the dancer said during a recent phone interview from his family home in Hampton, Va. "But that just wasn't contemporary with my life, who I was. . . . "I didn't feel noble. I felt other, complex kinds of things. Hopefully, I'm now bringing those issues, those feelings, to my work."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1997 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ride off into the sunset, cowboy. Joe Goode says it's time for a new maverick. "There are these other, really unsung people," Goode said. "They routinely encounter a reality most of us spend our lives shying away from, and they are the real mavericks. I thought I'd like to make a piece about them." He's talking about AIDS caregivers, and the piece is "Maverick Strain," which Goode's Performance Group will present tonight at the Irvine Barclay Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1989 | WILLIAM WILSON
The universe of art is awash in words. It has become a sphere that communicates in the accents of advertising. Except Ed Moses. At every turn one encounters art that is: (a) all words, like the crawling light signs of Jenny Holzer (b) words-and-pictures like Barbara Kruger's agitprop posters or (c) signs and images such as those of Matt Mullican. Words, words, words. Even the prevailing critical method grows from the analysis of words. Everybody is into verbal. Except Joe Goode.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1991 | FRANKIE WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With a Romanticism so high it levitates, Joe Goode looks at death through the dark waters of doubt in his latest performance piece, "Remembering the Pool at the Best Western." He wonders at first "where it is exactly" that his dead friends go, and by the end of this 70-minute dance-theater creation, when the operatic impulses stirring at its center have quietly rippled away into hypnotic reverie, Goode has found his answer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1997 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What can you do on days when staying in bed seems the best alternative? Because you're sick of seeing suffering, because you're tired of being marginalized and just because uphill was not the direction you thought you'd always have to go? If you're Joe Goode Performance Group, you explore the mythical cowboy past and play with images of stoic men who were tall in the saddle but short on empathy, and the women who admired them but wished to heck that a man didn't have to do what a man had to do.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1991 | FRANKIE WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Life can pose its big questions in unexpected ways and unlikely places. For Joe Goode, mastermind and heart of the San Francisco-based Joe Goode Performance Group, there's humor in that--and inspiration. "So there I am in the pool at the Burbank Best Western having a transcendental cathartic experience . . ." he said during a phone interview from Santa Fe, N. M., where he was performing and teaching last week. His unfinished sentence brimmed with "of-all-places" irony.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2003 | Jennifer Fisher, Special to The Times
In the land of Joe Goode, the gentle giant of dance-theater from San Francisco, there are always small squares of light, in which interesting characters speak or sing little home truths. Things like, "love is doomed" and "it's just so hard to keep performing a version of yourself."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2000 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
The relationship between hero worship and the formation of personal identity shaped two multidisciplinary one-act pieces by the Bay Area-based Joe Goode Performance Group on Saturday at the Carpenter Center in Long Beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2000
8pm Theater In "Ancestral Voices," A.R. Gurney's autobiographical comedy directed by Gordon Hunt, a young man reflects on his family life in Buffalo, N.Y., in the 1940s--especially the shocking moment when his grandmother ran off with another man. Fred Savage, Robert Foxworthy, Rene Auberjonois, Katherine Helmond and Mariette Hartley star. * "Ancestral Voices," Falcon Theatre, 4252 Riverside Drive, Burbank. Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 3:30 p.m. Ends Nov. 26. $25 to $35. (818) 955-8101.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2000 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For 40 years, Joe Goode has made very good work, consistently turning out paintings that provide considerable, if restrained, pleasures. While it has never been difficult to like the artist's abstract images, loving them has been another matter. Rarely have they triggered wild excitement, causing viewers to throw caution to the wind and risk making fools of themselves. All this changes in a series of gorgeous new paintings at L.A. Louver Gallery.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2000 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
The trouble with category-busting performance art is that it requires a breed of category-busting performance artist currently in very short supply. Case in point: Joe Goode's deeply flawed "Deeply There (stories of a neighborhood)," given its local premiere by Goode's Bay Area-based company in the Freud Playhouse at UCLA on Friday.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1999 | VERENA DOBNIK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The ice-cream truck rolls around the corner, bells clanging as the driver yanks a tattered rope. A dog sits bolt upright on a stoop. The boxer's canine treat is here--a cup of vanilla from Joe Villardi's Good Humor truck. The silver-haired man everyone calls Joe is working his route, stopping by homes, gas stations, factories where he knows his clients by their first name.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2008 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
It was any artist's nightmare. Painter Joe Goode and his wife, Hiromi Katayama, were sleeping in their Mar Vista home when their wolf-sized dog, Pollock, appeared at the foot of the bed, barking loudly. Pollock wouldn't stop until they stumbled out of bed, and followed him, half-asleep, into the small yard leading to Goode's painting studio. What Goode recalls seeing that morning seemed unimaginable, unthinkable, impossible. Smoke poured from his studio. Flames licked through the skylights.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I'm the guinea pig," said artist Joe Goode, whose work opened the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's new "Laboratory" series Thursday. Designed by Howard N. Fox, the museum's curator of contemporary art, the series is intended to allow artists to create works of unusual scope in the museum galleries.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1997 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Small-scale versions of Joe Goode's recent nature-based abstract paintings are the main event at Peter Blake Gallery through March 30. These moodily gaseous color studies and shotgun-blasted pieces will look familiar to those who have seen the Goode exhibition at the Orange County Museum of Art in Newport Beach (through April 13).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1997 | JENNIFER FISHER
What can you do on days when staying in bed seems the best alternative? Because you're sick of seeing suffering, because you're tired of being marginalized and just because uphill was not the direction you thought you'd always have to go? If you're Joe Goode Performance Group, you explore the mythical cowboy past and play with images of stoic men who were tall in the saddle but short on empathy, and the women who admired them but wished to heck that a man didn't have to do what a man had to do.
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