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Joe Graydon

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Graydon, the former FBI agent who became a debonair big band crooner, television host, personal manager and, finally, producer of road shows for the sedentary circuit, has died. He was 82. Graydon died Saturday at his home in Glendale, said his longtime friend Chuck Benedict. Since 1978, the suave singer had packaged shows featuring artists, bands and the music he used to perform in the 1940s.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Graydon, the former FBI agent who became a debonair big band crooner, television host, personal manager and, finally, producer of road shows for the sedentary circuit, has died. He was 82. Graydon died Saturday at his home in Glendale, said his longtime friend Chuck Benedict. Since 1978, the suave singer had packaged shows featuring artists, bands and the music he used to perform in the 1940s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1991 | JACK HAWN, Jack Hawn retired Friday as a Times copy editor.
Talk about a name-dropper. Joe Graydon seems to know them all. "Here's some of the people I've used," he said of a hastily scribbled list. Included were Kay Starr, Martha Tilton, Tony Martin, Frankie Laine, Margaret Whiting, Herb Jeffries, Maxene Andrews, Harry Babbitt, Connie Haines . . . and more than 20 other singers, a few vocal groups, a couple of dancers, six specialty musicians and 10 big bands.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1997 | LEO SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Graydon doesn't think he's being nostalgic when he hums Glenn Miller's "In the Mood," gives a soft rendition of "Slow Boat to China" or whistles some other hit tune from the big-band era of the 1930s and 1940s. As far as Graydon is concerned, he's very much in the present. "To me, it's like big band never left. It's very current to me," said the Glendale resident and concert producer. "I feel like I know every note of every arrangement that was a hit in those days."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1997 | LEO SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Graydon doesn't think he's being nostalgic when he hums Glenn Miller's "In the Mood," gives a soft rendition of "Slow Boat to China" or whistles some other hit tune from the big-band era of the 1930s and 1940s. As far as Graydon is concerned, he's very much in the present. "To me, it's like big band never left. It's very current to me," said the Glendale resident and concert producer. "I feel like I know every note of every arrangement that was a hit in those days."
NEWS
July 13, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Helen Forrest, a big band singer who recorded more than 500 songs including "All the Things You Are" with Artie Shaw and "The Man I Love" with Benny Goodman, has died. She was 82. Forrest died Sunday at the Motion Picture and Television Country Home and Hospital in Woodland Hills of congestive heart failure, said her publicist, Alan Eichler. She had been hospitalized since April 13 because of pneumonia. Born Helen Fogel in Atlantic City, N.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1989 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
It's an experiment, said Phil Quinn, vice president and general manager of the San Diego Sports Arena: putting the Harry James Orchestra, which hasn't had a hit since the late 1940s, into a venue that normally features the most contemporary pop stars. The orchestra, directed by trumpeter Fred Radke since James died in 1983, will be appearing at the arena on Sunday, along with singers Connie Haines, Dick Castle, and Art Lund.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1987 | JACK HAWN
Johnnie Ray is shedding no tears about hitting "the Big Six-O" a few weeks ago (Jan. 10), but he admits his eyes still well up now and then when he croons two of his biggest hits of yesteryear, "Cry" and "The Little White Cloud That Cried," which he wrote. "It depends on my attitude," he said the other day. "You can only go so far with an audience and then they become embarrassed." Once dubbed "Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2000
In a demonstration of how tight spaces can foster a sense of openness, the 2,300-square-foot Richard and Dion Neutra VDL Research House II will be open to the public Sunday, offering a rare opportunity for viewing the Modernist residence. Given landmark status by Los Angeles' Cultural Heritage Commission in 1997, the home features an arresting mix of reflecting pools, mirrors, glass and steel that will be the backdrop for an evening focusing on the restoration of the cultural landmark.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1990 | GERALD FARIS
The music at two Christmas concerts today will be the familiar words and melodies of the season. Backed by the recorded sounds of the London Symphony Orchestra, 36 crystalline boy soprano voices of The All-American Boys Chorus will fill the Norris Theatre for the Performing Arts with festive Christmas music, along with a song celebrating Hanukkah.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1991 | JACK HAWN, Jack Hawn retired Friday as a Times copy editor.
Talk about a name-dropper. Joe Graydon seems to know them all. "Here's some of the people I've used," he said of a hastily scribbled list. Included were Kay Starr, Martha Tilton, Tony Martin, Frankie Laine, Margaret Whiting, Herb Jeffries, Maxene Andrews, Harry Babbitt, Connie Haines . . . and more than 20 other singers, a few vocal groups, a couple of dancers, six specialty musicians and 10 big bands.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1991 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Big Band leader Jimmy Dorsey died in 1957, but his legacy survives through the many incarnations of his band. The 1991 version plays San Diego this Sunday night at the San Diego Sports Arena as part of a coast-to-coast tour called the Big Band Jamboree. Special guests include Terry Gibbs on vibes, singer Fran Jeffries and the vocal group String of Pearls. For sax and clarinet man Henry Cuesta, who conducts the band and re-creates Jimmy Dorsey's solos, this tour is a dream come true.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1997 | LEO SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Graydon doesn't think he's being nostalgic when he hums Glenn Miller's "In the Mood," gives a soft rendition of "Slow Boat to China," or whistles some other hit tune from the big-band era of the 1930s and 1940s. As far as Graydon is concerned, he's very much in the present. "To me, it's like big band never left. It's very current to me," said the Glendale resident and concert producer. "I feel like I know every note of every arrangement that was a hit in those days."
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