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Joe Henderson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Henderson, a tenor saxophonist known for his inventive improvisation and lyrical contemporary jazz style who was late to achieve the widespread fame he had long deserved, has died at the age of 64. Henderson earned four Grammys, three of them for best album in the early 1990s when he was in his mid-50s. He died Saturday of heart failure in San Francisco where he had lived for more than 25 years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013
A powerhouse on baritone saxophone, the New York-based Gary Smulyan was a fixture in a number of bands fronted by jazz royalty, including Joe Henderson, Freddie Hubbard and Lionel Hampton. Here he performs in support of his 2012 album "Smul's Paradise" backed by Darek Oles and Joe La Barbera. The Blue Whale, 123 Astronaut E S Onizuka St., Suite 301. Fri. 9 p.m. $15. http://www.bluewhalemusic.com
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There are those who would claim that he's been there for 30 years. But today, there's no disputing that Joe Henderson sits at the top of the tenor sax heap.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman writes frequently about jazz for The Times
Joe Henderson's death on June 30 at age 64 did not come as a surprise. For months, even years, his reportedly fragile health had been a topic of concern to many in the jazz community. Conversations with friends in San Francisco, where he lived, inevitably included the question, "Have you seen Joe? How's he doing?" and almost equally inevitably elicited the response, "I'm not sure, but he didn't look good the last time I saw him."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1995 | DON HECKMAN
Always expect a surprise from Joe Henderson. Aside from the ever-appealing qualities of his playing, a good part of the pleasure of hearing the San Francisco-based tenor saxophonist lies in the fact that he never quite does what one anticipates. With a new album about to be released in which he features the songs of Antonio Carlos Jobim, one might have envisioned a few sambas and bossa novas during his opening set at Catalina Bar & Grill on Wednesday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1987 | DON HECKMAN
Tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson is a prime example of that too common phenomenon--the jazzman whose music never seems to get the attention it deserves. One of the few legitimate tenor saxophone successors to John Coltrane and Sonny Rollins, he has been a continuously creative, productive player for three decades, without ever actually breaking through to the top level of jazz visibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
Put this one on your jazz calendar with a big star: Joe Henderson, Billy Childs, Tony Dumas and Roy Haynes at Catalina Bar and Grill in Hollywood--through Sunday night. When such performers as tenor saxophonist Henderson arrive in town for an impromptu gig with a local rhythm section, the results can be erratic, at best. But Tuesday's opening-night combination clicked into gear with the smooth acceleration of a Ferrari moving into the fast lane.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As many times as you may have heard the old Billy Strayhorn tune "Take the 'A' Train," you've probably never it heard quite the way tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson played it Sunday, the second and closing day of the Orange County Register Jazz & Blues Festival on the UC Irvine campus. In Henderson's hands, the old war horse, played at a breakneck speed, became a magical vehicle of expression, filled with revealing passages and strong statements of personal identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1992 | GENE SEYMOUR, NEWSDAY
The late Dexter Gordon was fond of telling audiences that playing "Body and Soul" was a moment of truth for every tenor saxophonist. And in the 53 years since Coleman Hawkins turned that sad Johnny Green dirge into his own concerto, tenors have felt challenged to take hold of the tune and project--if not define--the full measure of their personalities. Joe Henderson is no different. Some tenors can bowl you over with just their big sound.
NEWS
January 20, 1994 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the past several years, the jazz marketing machinery has placed a premium on youth, sometimes promoting undercooked players with more time than talent on their side. And, then, there is the story of Joe Henderson, straight out of the better-late-than-never file. The warm and witty tenor saxophonist, now 56, has been a powerful figure and cult favorite among musicians and aficionados since he began making solo albums for the Blue Note label in the mid-1960s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Henderson, a tenor saxophonist known for his inventive improvisation and lyrical contemporary jazz style who was late to achieve the widespread fame he had long deserved, has died at the age of 64. Henderson earned four Grammys, three of them for best album in the early 1990s when he was in his mid-50s. He died Saturday of heart failure in San Francisco where he had lived for more than 25 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1998 | Don Heckman
Concept albums--projects centered on a specific point of view or a related collection of materials--have done well in jazz in recent years. Joe Henderson has benefited from recordings based on the music of Billy Strayhorn and Antonio Carlos Jobim. And Terence Blanchard has done well with, among others, an album devoted to songs associated with Billie Holiday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson opened a six-night run at Catalina Bar & Grill on Tuesday with a typically hard-swinging sextet. No special news there, since Henderson, whether performing with a trio, a quartet, a big band or whatever, always manages to produce music rich in rhythm and overflowing with imagination. What was news was the presence of vibist Stefon Harris.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joe Henderson and George Gershwin would have made an interesting combination. Gershwin was a lover of jazz and a compositional innovator. Henderson, fond of Gershwin's music from his earliest playing days, is a similarly probing seeker after new musical horizons. A duet between them, with Gershwin's ever-busy piano style countering Henderson's warm, probing tenor saxophone playing, might have produced some entrancing music. That's never going to happen, of course.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson's opening night at the Jazz Bakery on Tuesday had the very thing that his recent and much celebrated recording of songs from George Gershwin's "Porgy and Bess" lacked: a strong presence from Joe Henderson.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1996 | DON HECKMAN
Tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson was his familiar, adventurous self Tuesday night in the opening set of his six-night run at Catalina Bar & Grill. Slender, with a trim, professorial-looking white beard, completely focused on his instrument, he played superbly in a program devoted mostly to works by Antonio Carlos Jobim.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013
A powerhouse on baritone saxophone, the New York-based Gary Smulyan was a fixture in a number of bands fronted by jazz royalty, including Joe Henderson, Freddie Hubbard and Lionel Hampton. Here he performs in support of his 2012 album "Smul's Paradise" backed by Darek Oles and Joe La Barbera. The Blue Whale, 123 Astronaut E S Onizuka St., Suite 301. Fri. 9 p.m. $15. http://www.bluewhalemusic.com
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They're no regular Joes. One, awarded three Grammys for his last two recordings, is arguably the jazz world's leading instrumentalist. The other has been its top blues and ballad singer for 40 years, ever since he joined the Count Basie Orchestra. When Joe Henderson and Joe Williams share the stage Friday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center, it will be much like a boxing card that features two heavyweight champions. It's no surprise that the two admire each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1995 | DON HECKMAN
Always expect a surprise from Joe Henderson. Aside from the ever-appealing qualities of his playing, a good part of the pleasure of hearing the San Francisco-based tenor saxophonist lies in the fact that he never quite does what one anticipates. With a new album about to be released in which he features the songs of Antonio Carlos Jobim, one might have envisioned a few sambas and bossa novas during his opening set at Catalina Bar & Grill on Wednesday night.
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