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Joe Hicks

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1997
When Joe Hicks wrote, "Integration as a strategy to end white supremacy in the economic, political and social life of the nation is no longer critical" (Opinion, "The Changing Face of America" July 20), I had to figure out if this man had lost touch with reality, was attempting to enhance his fund-raising profile, seeking brownie points from white folks or had joined the ranks of the "Eurocentric Negroes," or all of the above. I am not a supporter of integration, at least not in the sense that all people of color must assimilate as white wannabes.
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OPINION
January 6, 2004
Re "Identity Politics Encroach on Civil Rights," Commentary, Jan. 2: Joe Hicks and David Lehrer target the wrong groups. Identity politics have always been a part of the fabric of white America. They have never worked for communities of color precisely because race and ethnicity remain major factors in accessing economic and political power. Hicks should understand this. America's institutionalized identity politics (personified by George W. Bush), rather than "teacher unions" and "orthodox civil rights groups," etc., remain this nation's foremost domestic problem.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1999
Joe Hicks, executive director of the Los Angeles Human Relations Commission, was appointed Thursday to the State Bar Board of Governors. Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa made the appointment to the 22-member board charged with overseeing the State Bar and administering discipline and licensing of California lawyers. "Joe Hicks is a man of extraordinary integrity," said Villaraigosa. "It is critical to the work of the bar that the board include individuals like Mr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1999
Joe Hicks, executive director of the Los Angeles Human Relations Commission, was appointed Thursday to the State Bar Board of Governors. Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa made the appointment to the 22-member board charged with overseeing the State Bar and administering discipline and licensing of California lawyers. "Joe Hicks is a man of extraordinary integrity," said Villaraigosa. "It is critical to the work of the bar that the board include individuals like Mr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1996 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cal State Northridge student leaders agreed Thursday to pay a Los Angeles civil rights activist the same $4,000 speaker's fee promised to former Klan Grand Wizard David Duke for a Sept. 25 campus debate on affirmative action. Joe Hicks, head of the Los Angeles-based Multicultural Collaborative, had agreed to accept $1,000 for the debate--$3,000 less than the amount promised to Duke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1996 | SANDY BANKS and BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The final batch of tickets for today's affirmative action debate at Cal State Northridge was snapped up Tuesday, as a last ditch legal challenge by Proposition 209 proponents failed to block the debate. More than 100 students were lined up outside the CSUN Student Union when the ticket office opened at 9:30 a.m. By noon, all 430 tickets for a closed-circuit television viewing of the debate--which pits ex-Klansman David Duke against civil rights activist Joe Hicks--were gone.
NEWS
April 23, 1999 | DARRYL FEARS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why can't Los Angeles be more like Joe R. Hicks? Hicks himself is wondering. The 57-year-old executive director of the Los Angeles Human Relations Commission has transformed himself over the years from a gun-toting black nationalist living in Watts to an advocate of multiculturalism, married to a Jewish woman and raising two girls in the Hollywood Hills. "My shift was from a place where race defined all, a very simplistic view," he said. "I reject race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1997 | FRANK B. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two students in favor of affirmative action lost their right to protest when they threw chunks of concrete at police and attacked a mounted officer during a raucous demonstration at Cal State Northridge last year, prosecutors told jurors Monday. The two students, 23-year-old Sergio Gutierrez and 21-year-old Edward Vasquez, face up to a year in jail if convicted of assault with a deadly weapon in the trial that began Monday in Van Nuys Municipal Court. Each defendant has denied the allegations.
SPORTS
January 5, 1989
Joe Hicks, former coach at Long Beach City College, was inducted into the Hall of Fame of the American Baseball Coaches Assn. He is the only California junior college coach ever inducted.
SPORTS
June 5, 1994
Cal State Northridge senior Joe Hicks finished 13th in a field of 17 shotputters Saturday night at the NCAA Division I track and field championships at Boise State. Hicks, competing for the first time in a national meet, had a best distance of 58 feet 1 inch--more than two feet under his personal best of 60 feet 6 3/4 inches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1999
Re "Rejecting Race as an Identity," April 23: God bless Joe Hicks. I have lived in L.A. for a year and my favorite thing about this town is its diversity. I look out my window onto Ocean Front Walk and see a sea of people from every corner of the Earth, speaking a hundred languages at once. I order breakfast from an African Japanese waiter, grab a Coke from the Korean place down the street, say hello to my Jewish apartment manager while I come home to send an e-mail to my Mexican Scottish niece and her Italian husband about how much I enjoy living at the cutting edge of a future where ethnic origin is irrelevant.
NEWS
April 23, 1999 | DARRYL FEARS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why can't Los Angeles be more like Joe R. Hicks? Hicks himself is wondering. The 57-year-old executive director of the Los Angeles Human Relations Commission has transformed himself over the years from a gun-toting black nationalist living in Watts to an advocate of multiculturalism, married to a Jewish woman and raising two girls in the Hollywood Hills. "My shift was from a place where race defined all, a very simplistic view," he said. "I reject race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1999 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Human Relations Commission, the city agency taking the lead in trying to defuse tensions at a San Fernando Valley elementary school, is also the subject of a new report concluding that the agency lacks focus and has done little more than produce a calendar and an essay contest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1997
Mayor Richard Riordan on Monday named Joe Hicks, a well-known local civil rights leader, as director of the city's Human Relations Commission. Hicks, a former leader of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, now runs the Los Angeles Multicultural Collaborative, a nonprofit consortium of community and civil rights organizations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1997 | FRANK B. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two students in favor of affirmative action lost their right to protest when they threw chunks of concrete at police and attacked a mounted officer during a raucous demonstration at Cal State Northridge last year, prosecutors told jurors Monday. The two students, 23-year-old Sergio Gutierrez and 21-year-old Edward Vasquez, face up to a year in jail if convicted of assault with a deadly weapon in the trial that began Monday in Van Nuys Municipal Court. Each defendant has denied the allegations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1997 | JASON TERADA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than 300 students, faculty and staff members at Cal Lutheran University--rattled by a recent rash of racist and homophobic graffiti and neo-Nazi literature appearing around the campus--gathered in the school's gymnasium Tuesday to hear how the incidents are being handled.
OPINION
January 6, 2004
Re "Identity Politics Encroach on Civil Rights," Commentary, Jan. 2: Joe Hicks and David Lehrer target the wrong groups. Identity politics have always been a part of the fabric of white America. They have never worked for communities of color precisely because race and ethnicity remain major factors in accessing economic and political power. Hicks should understand this. America's institutionalized identity politics (personified by George W. Bush), rather than "teacher unions" and "orthodox civil rights groups," etc., remain this nation's foremost domestic problem.
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