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Joe Higgs

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December 20, 1999 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Higgs, a reggae singer best known for fostering the career of Bob Marley, died Saturday night in Los Angeles after a long struggle with cancer. He was 59. It was in Higgs' yard in the Trench Town ghetto in Kingston, Jamaica, that the young Marley received years of private tutoring in vocal technique and stagecraft from Higgs, years before Marley began recording with his group the Wailers. Marley later credited Higgs with his international success.
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NEWS
December 20, 1999 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Higgs, a reggae singer best known for fostering the career of Bob Marley, died Saturday night in Los Angeles after a long struggle with cancer. He was 59. It was in Higgs' yard in the Trench Town ghetto in Kingston, Jamaica, that the young Marley received years of private tutoring in vocal technique and stagecraft from Higgs, years before Marley began recording with his group the Wailers. Marley later credited Higgs with his international success.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
There is too much affirmation, warmth and spirituality in Joe Higgs' reggae music to warrant mentioning him in the same sentence as Ebenezer Scrooge. However, the Jamaican singer and the Dickensian grinch do have one problem in common: a hard time shaking free from Marley's ghost. In "A Christmas Carol," Jacob Marley's baleful spirit returns to help teach Scrooge the error of his coldhearted ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
There is too much affirmation, warmth and spirituality in Joe Higgs' reggae music to warrant mentioning him in the same sentence as Ebenezer Scrooge. However, the Jamaican singer and the Dickensian grinch do have one problem in common: a hard time shaking free from Marley's ghost. In "A Christmas Carol," Jacob Marley's baleful spirit returns to help teach Scrooge the error of his coldhearted ways.
NEWS
November 11, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A hot rod careened out of control during a drag race and flew into the grandstand, killing Vickie Lynn Foster, 36, who used her body as a shield to protect her 5-year-old son. The boy was hospitalized in critical condition, and six other people were hurt as they tried to flee. The accident at a National Hot Rod Assn. event at Sumerduck Racetrack in northern Virginia occurred during a street car division race, with speeds up to 100 mph.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1991 | DON SNOWDEN
"Talkin' Blues" is a collection of unreleased tracks from the early days of the Wailers' international career, but rather than an album of bottom-of-the-vaults filler it's a valuable addition to the legacy of a group that revolutionized the pop world.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1995 | DON SNOWDEN
Shaggy's brand of reggae may never win awards for originality or depth, but he's got two huge pop hits in "Oh, Carolina" and "Boombastic" under his belt. The Jamaican-born, New York-based dancehall deejay's 90-minute set at the Palace on Thursday was a canny synthesis of reggae's past glories. Shaggy's deep voice blended Shabba Ranks with the comic flair of Eek-a-Mouse, and he intuitively knew how far to play the dancehall deejay sex stud without becoming offensively macho.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1991 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Many radio and television stations around the world will broadcast part or all of a version of John Lennon's anti-war ode "Give Peace a Chance" with new lyrics by his 15-year-old son, Sean, at 7 this morning, and MTV will air the video in its entirety at 8 p.m., 9 p.m. and 10 p.m. The 7 a.m. broadcast will be simultaneous with a transmission to the stations by satellite. In protest against imminent war in the Persian Gulf region as tonight's U.N.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN
Ever get a craving for some new, unfamiliar music, only to wind up staring at a bin full of records without the slightest clue as to which album to pick? There's no way around the shot-in-the-dark method until you start finding performers, labels and styles you like--or until you run into a godsend like Ronnie Graham's book, "The Da Capo Guide to Contemporary African Music" (Da Capo Press, 315 pages).
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite the inclusion of a few well-known outsiders and styles ranging from bop to reggae, the opening day of the Jazz at Drew festival had a definite West Coast flavor. Los Angeles-based performers, many with international reputations, predominated in the fifth annual fund-raiser for the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science held Saturday on the grounds of the King-Drew Medical Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1986 | DON SNOWDEN
The upcoming Wailers album "Together Again" isn't just your average reunion record. Besides Bunny Wailer, Peter Tosh, Junior Braitwaithe and Constantine Walker, the lineup will feature the group's other original member: Bob Marley, the charismatic reggae singer who died in 1981. One disc of the double album will feature a compilation of songs the Wailers recorded in the mid-'60s for small Jamaican labels.
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