Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJoe Hill
IN THE NEWS

Joe Hill

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2010
Horns A Novel Joe Hill William Morrow: 370 pp., $25.99
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
“Horns,” starring Daniel Radcliffe and directed by Alexandre Aja, has been picked up for distribution by Dimension and Radius-TWC, with plans for a 2014 theatrical release. The supernatural thriller premiered last month at the Toronto International Film Festival, where Radcliffe also appeared in the romantic comedy “The F Word” and as the young poet Allen Ginsberg in “Kill Your Darlings.” The 24-year-old actor seems to be in the midst of fully launching himself into the next phase of his career after his run in the “Harry Potter” franchise.
Advertisement
OPINION
November 20, 2011 | By William M. Adler
On the morning after the killings, Salt Lake City awoke to sensational headlines. "Father and Son Slain by Masked Murderers," the Herald-Republican bannered across its front page. The father, a 47-year-old grocer named John G. Morrison, and his son Arling, 17, had been shot to death on the night of Jan. 10, 1914. Within hours, the police had detained a prime suspect for the father's death: Frank Z. Wilson, an alias of one Magnus Olson, an ex-convict who had done time in the Utah state penitentiary.
NATIONAL
December 19, 2012 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - "Hum!" Jana Ballard bellowed at a group of men old enough to be her father. " HUM!" she said again, a bit more loudly. "Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm," the men replied obediently, their faces flushed from holding the note. It was the fifth time that evening the New York City Labor Chorus had gone through "The Ballad of Joe Hill," a six-verse paean to the ill-fated unionist ("The copper bosses killed you, Joe"), and signs of weariness were showing among the singers. A soprano rolled her eyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1990 | JANICE ARKATOV
Before any of the modern-day labor organizers, there were the International Workers of the World--and Joe Hill. "He was a central figure in 20th-Century radicalism," explained Thomas Babe, whose "Salt Lake City Skyline" opens this weekend at the Odyssey. "Joe Hill was one of the chief spokespersons of the I.W.W. (a.k.a. 'Wobblies'), a popular organizer--and he also wrote songs. So he was kind of the bard of the movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2007 | Jerry Harkavy, Associated Press
Joe Hill knew it was only a matter of time before one of the publishing industry's hottest little secrets became common knowledge. He just wished he could have kept it under wraps a bit longer. But when Hill's fantasy-tinged thriller, "Heart-Shaped Box," came out last month, it was inevitable that his thoroughbred bloodlines as a writer of horror and the supernatural would be out there for all to see.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1990 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Hill must have been more stageworthy than he seems in Thomas Babe's "Salt Lake City Skyline," at the Odyssey. The legendary labor organizer and songwriter was executed by a Utah firing squad in 1915, convicted of the murder of a Salt Lake City grocer and his son. The evidence was flimsy--primarily consisting of an unexplained gunshot wound to Hill on the same night as the murder. Hill refused to say what happened to him that night.
NEWS
November 20, 1988 | United Press International
A vial containing ashes of Joe Hill, the legendary union organizer and martyr shot by a Utah firing squad 73 years ago after a questionable murder conviction, were released to his union Friday by the government. National Archives officials handed over a white porcelain cylinder--containing a small quantity of Hill's ashes--to Frederic Lee, chairman of the General Executive Board of the Industrial Workers of the World--the IWW, more commonly known as the "Wobblies."
BOOKS
February 22, 2004 | Michael Kazin, Michael Kazin, a history professor at Georgetown University, is the author of "The Populist Persuasion" and coauthor of "America Divided: The Civil War of the 1960s."
It's a hard time to be a revolutionary in America. The Communist Party lives on mostly in the curses of the right, new left utopianism has largely shriveled into paeans to diversity and a fondness for Ralph Nader, and the only visible anarchists dress up in black bandannas to fight police and trash the local Starbucks. In postmodern culture, "radicalism" has become little more than a fashion statement of prosperous avant-gardists who disdain political rhetoric.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | ROBERT MIMS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As the 75th anniversary of his execution nears, Joe Hill lives on in the efforts of unionists, in the animus of the grandson of the man he was convicted of killing--and in dreams. "I dreamed I saw Joe Hill last night, alive as you and me," goes the union organizers' song, and it is the labor movement that is most eager to memorialize the man it claims as a martyr.
OPINION
November 20, 2011 | By William M. Adler
On the morning after the killings, Salt Lake City awoke to sensational headlines. "Father and Son Slain by Masked Murderers," the Herald-Republican bannered across its front page. The father, a 47-year-old grocer named John G. Morrison, and his son Arling, 17, had been shot to death on the night of Jan. 10, 1914. Within hours, the police had detained a prime suspect for the father's death: Frank Z. Wilson, an alias of one Magnus Olson, an ex-convict who had done time in the Utah state penitentiary.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2010
Horns A Novel Joe Hill William Morrow: 370 pp., $25.99
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2007 | Jerry Harkavy, Associated Press
Joe Hill knew it was only a matter of time before one of the publishing industry's hottest little secrets became common knowledge. He just wished he could have kept it under wraps a bit longer. But when Hill's fantasy-tinged thriller, "Heart-Shaped Box," came out last month, it was inevitable that his thoroughbred bloodlines as a writer of horror and the supernatural would be out there for all to see.
BOOKS
March 11, 2007 | Dale Bailey, Dale Bailey is the author of several books, including the novels "House of Bones" and "The Fallen."
LIKE most ghost stories, Joe Hill's debut novel, "Heart-Shaped Box" (William Morrow: 376 pp., $24.95), is a meditation on the past -- its dangers, its temptations, its penchant for warping the present into a mirror of long-ago traumas. The novel's hero, a washed-up rock star born Justin Cowzynski, strives above all to let "the past be past."
BOOKS
February 22, 2004 | Michael Kazin, Michael Kazin, a history professor at Georgetown University, is the author of "The Populist Persuasion" and coauthor of "America Divided: The Civil War of the 1960s."
It's a hard time to be a revolutionary in America. The Communist Party lives on mostly in the curses of the right, new left utopianism has largely shriveled into paeans to diversity and a fondness for Ralph Nader, and the only visible anarchists dress up in black bandannas to fight police and trash the local Starbucks. In postmodern culture, "radicalism" has become little more than a fashion statement of prosperous avant-gardists who disdain political rhetoric.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bobby Joe Hill, 59, the leading scorer for the Texas Western team that won the 1966 national championship and changed the landscape of college basketball, died Sunday in El Paso of an apparent heart attack. Coach Don Haskins started Hill and four other black players in that NCAA championship game against top-ranked Kentucky. Texas Western College, now known as the University of Texas at El Paso, beat Kentucky, which started five white players, 72-65.
BOOKS
September 8, 2002 | STANLEY ARONOWITZ, Stanley Aronowitz is author of the forthcoming "How Class Works," which will be published by Yale University Press in spring. He is the Green Party candidate for governor of New York.
In the face of the Bush administration's threats to impose sanctions against West Coast dockworkers under Taft-Hartley and the Patriot Act provision, the International Longshore and Warehouse Union is prepared to mount a coast-wide strike against stevedoring companies that are demanding steep concessions from workers. The union will most likely defy the president and close the ports, an action profoundly reminiscent of the strike by the United Mineworkers, under the leadership of John L.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|