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Joe I Tompkins

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1990
The list of 1989 Academy Award nominees in Thursday's Calendar included the names of the movies but not the individuals nominated in some production categories.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1993 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actors, when they're in their tour-de-force mode, sometimes glom onto aggressively silly or sentimental roles for dear life. "Wrestling Ernest Hemingway" (selected theaters) has not one but two of these roles. Robert Duvall plays Walter, a retired Cuban barber in south Florida, and Richard Harris is Frank, an Irish ex-sea captain. The movie is supposed to be about how these two disparate gents become friends, but it's really about scenery eating.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like last month's "Mom and Dad Save the World," "Stay Tuned" (citywide) is another elaborate misfired comedy fantasy from Warners dedicated to the proposition that there's nothing like high adventure to recharge a stale suburban marriage. While Helen Knable (Pam Dawber) scales the heights of Seattle's advertising world, her husband, Roy (John Ritter), a struggling plumbing-supplies salesman, increasingly seeks escape in TV.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | BETTY GOODWIN
The movie: "Harlem Nights" The look: Gangster polish, circa 1938. Without relying on costume cliches, tough guys Eddie Murphy, Richard Pryor, Redd Foxx et al. move in a decadent world without appearing boorish. The costume designer: Joe I. Tompkins, two-time Emmy award winner for "Eleanor and Franklin" and "Eleanor and Franklin: The White House Years." Other credits include "Swing Shift," "Betrayed," "Nuts," "The River," "Missing" and "True Confessions."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1989 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
"Harlem Nights" (citywide) opens with something shocking for an Eddie Murphy movie: unintentional humor. In glamorous script, the credits announce that this is a Paramount presentation, in association with Eddie Murphy Productions . . . of an Eddie Murphy film, starring . . . Eddie Murphy. The old Murphy--the devilish kid who once disrupted a TV awards show by stealing Lionel Richie's Grammy--might have quashed this crushed-silk canonization with a raucous, honking laugh.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1986 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Two-thirds through "Violets Are Blue" (selected theaters), Sissy Spacek exclaims enthusiastically to Kevin Kline, "God, it would be a week in the Mideast and Central America!" You'd think she were talking about a Club Med vacation. Ensuing unintended laughter makes the film, heretofore engaging, burst like a soap bubble. And like Humpty Dumpty after his fall, there's no putting it together again.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Earl Pilcher Jr. is not Mr. Excitement. The gruff owner of a tractor dealership in a small Arkansas town, Earl considers a trip to nearby Shreveport a big deal. Yet this prickly, hardscrabble man in his 60s, carefully played by Robert Duvall, is about to embark on the greatest adventure life has to offer: He's going to find out exactly who he is.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1993 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Fire in the Sky," a UFO movie, doesn't fly. It claims to be based on an actual case of alien abduction but the movie is as phony as a $3 bill. The opening, at least, is peppy. A clearing in a nighttime forest slowly brightens as the credits roll. Then the scene shifts abruptly to a pick-up truck charging wildly along the dirt roads before screeching to a halt in front of the local saloon. Its occupants--four loggers--straggle zombie-like inside.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1998 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
At one of the many moments of precious insight in Randa Haines' "Dance With Me," Rafael, a handsome young Cuban cleaning mirrors in a Houston studio asks Ruby, the professional dancer he admires, how she can practice her steps without music. It's a routine, honed through repetition, she explains. "But dance comes from the music; it tells you what to do," Rafael protests, adding impertinently, "That's probably why you look so stiff."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1986 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
What's a man to do when he's got triplets who've been accepted to Yale, but he can't afford to send them and no scholarships are in sight? If he's Alan Arkin, in the deliciously funny "Big Trouble" (at the Metro, Westwood), he's going to listen very carefully to what Beverly D'Angelo has to say. Knocking back straight vodka and wearing little under a filmy peignoir, D'Angelo bewails the imminent loss of her husband--"His heart is surrounded by fat!"
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